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Global Report On Diabetes 2017

World Health Organisation Issues Global Report On Diabetes, Calls On Governments And Civil Society To Speed Up Action

World Health Organisation Issues Global Report On Diabetes, Calls On Governments And Civil Society To Speed Up Action

Ahead of the 2016 World Health Day (7th of April) which focuses on diabetes for this year edition, the World Health Organisation released today its Global report on diabetes, calling on national governments and civil society to accelerate action to fight against the alarming rise in diabetes cases observed at international level. The report especially highlights that the number of patients affected by diabetes has quadrupled since 1980 to represent 8.5 percent of the world population. It outlines that the disease is a leading factor for contracting cardiovascular disease or having kidney failure, representing an important life-threat for citizens and generating high costs for healthcare systems. WHO Director-General Margaret Chan stressed the need for a stronger response to diabetes including all stakeholders from patients to food producers, and not only governments. She especially reminded WHO Member States commitment to reduce premature mortality from non-communicable diseases such as diabetes by one third by 2030, in light with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Through the report, WHO calls for greater prevention of diseases, by implementing policies that encourage healthier lifestyles including increased physical activity and healthy diets; and that discourage the consumption of sugary, fatty or salty food, including sugary drinks. Building on the experience of Mexico which implemented a tax scheme on sugary drinks, WHO’s recommended policy actions include increasing the price of foods with high amounts of sugar, fat and salt, with the aim of making their consumption decrease. The report also recommend to take action to manage diabetes, especially ensuring equal access to insulin and other essential medicines to patients across countries and to pro Continue reading >>

Who Released Global Report On Diabetes

Who Released Global Report On Diabetes

The World Health Organisation (WHO) on 6 April 2016 released its first Global Report on Diabetes. The report was released to mark the World Health Day 2016 that was celebrated on 7 April with the theme - Beat Diabetes. The report underscored the enormous scale of the diabetes problem across the world and suggested various measures to reverse current trends. • Global Burden: Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980. • Over the past decade, diabetes prevalence has risen faster in low and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. • Diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Higher-than-optimal blood glucose caused an additional 2.2 million deaths, by increasing the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases. • The majority of people with diabetes are affected by type 2 diabetes. This used to occur nearly entirely among adults, but now occurs in children too. • Economic impact: Diabetes and its complications bring about substantial economic loss to people with diabetes and their families and to health systems and national economies through direct medical costs and loss of work and wages. • Preventing diabetes: Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented with current knowledge. • Effective approaches are available to prevent type 2 diabetes and to prevent the complications and premature death that can result from all types of diabetes. • To tackle this enormous problem, there is a need for a whole-of-government and whole of-society approach, in which all sectors systematically consider the health impact of policies in trade, agriculture, finance, transport, education, etc. • National capacity for prevention and control of diabetes: National capacity to prevent and control diabetes as Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

Who Report On Diabetes

Who Report On Diabetes

The first WHO Global report on diabetes demonstrates that the number of adults living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults. This dramatic rise is largely due to the rise in type 2 diabetes and factors driving it include overweight and obesity. In 2012 alone diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths. Its complications can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. Continue reading >>

Global Diabetes Jumped 40% In The Last Two Years, Report Says

Global Diabetes Jumped 40% In The Last Two Years, Report Says

Global diabetes has increased by 40% over the last two years, according to a new report released Monday. Aetna International released “Diabetes: The world’s weightiest health challenge,” that found that diabetes, which is a group of diseases that result in too much sugar in the blood stream, has nearly doubled around the world since 2014-2016 with a 69% increase in North and South America last year alone. However, the Middle East and Africa were among the hardest hit according to the report, having the highest rate of diabetes over the last two years—that were twice the size of Europe and the Americas—and triple of Southeast Asia. Stella George, M.D. and senior medical director at Aetna International, who co-authored the report says the disease has the power destroy “economies” if we don’t try stop it now. “Across the globe, diabetes has the potential to overwhelm healthcare systems and wreck economies. Between 2014 and 2016 our member claims data shows that the total number of members with diabetes increased by an average of 40%, and claims costs related to diabetes treatment increased by an average of 47% – trends that are clearly unsustainable,” George said. According to the World Health Organization’s 2016 Global Report on Diabetes, the direct annual cost of the disease is around $827 billion. Additionally, the WHO says that diabetes is no longer a problem in wealthy countries, but is rapidly increasing in low—and moderate—income countries, accounting for nearly two-thirds of diabetes cases worldwide. In 2014, there were 422 million adults living with diabetes, which is a fourfold increase since 1980. “The disease is largely preventable and controllable. We need to transform the healthcare ecosystem for individuals around the world, bri Continue reading >>

Global Report On Diabetes - World Health Organization

Global Report On Diabetes - World Health Organization

Authored by WHO Not yet rated URL (7 MB) Download » In honor of World Health Day, the World Health Organization issued its first global report on diabetes. The report includes the scope of diabetes and its prevalence in the developing world, along with the serious health risks that increase among carriers. Steps and initiatives are mapped out to stop diabetes's spread and give better care to those already affected. To download the report click here: For more information, visit the World Health Day website: Continue reading >>

Prevalence, Perception And Factors Associated With Diabetes Mellitus Among The Adult Population In Central Vietnam: A Population-based, Cross-sectional Seroepidemiological Survey

Prevalence, Perception And Factors Associated With Diabetes Mellitus Among The Adult Population In Central Vietnam: A Population-based, Cross-sectional Seroepidemiological Survey

Go to: Abstract Diabetes Mellitus (DM) has rapidly become a major public health concern in Vietnam. Although the prevalence of DM has been studied in northern and southern Vietnam, little data are available for the central region. Therefore, the aims of this survey were to estimate the prevalence of DM and to identify the perception of and factors associated with DM among the adult population in central Vietnam. We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based survey in Khánh Hòa Province, Vietnam in December 2014 using three-stage cluster sampling and probability proportional to size sampling in line with the World Health Organization STEPwise approach. Four hundred and eighty residents aged 20–70 years were selected from 30 villages in 10 wards/communes. After obtaining informed consent, all residents participated in interviews regarding lifestyle, medical history, and perception of DM and underwent physical measurements and blood examination for fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin. Factors associated with DM were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Results A total of 376 residents were enrolled (response rate: 78.3%; females: 59%; rural residents: 61%). Among the participants, 14.3% and 18.9% of males and females, respectively, were classified as overweight/obese according to body mass index (BMI), 37.7% and 22.1%, respectively, had hypertension, and 36.4% and 11.7% had metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of DM in the entire population was 7.2% (27/376; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.6–9.8). Participants aged 60–70 years were more likely to have DM than those aged 30–39 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 8.7; 95%CI: 1.4–56.0), and participants classified as obese were more likely to have DM than those with normal or low BMI (aOR: 10.2; 95 Continue reading >>

Global Report On Diabetes

Global Report On Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise. No longer a disease of predominantly rich nations, the prevalence of diabetes is steadily increasing everywhere, most markedly in the world’s middle-income countries. Unfortunately, in many settings the lack of effective policies to create supportive environments for healthy lifestyles and the lack of access to quality health care means that the prevention and treatment of diabetes, particularly for people of modest means, are not being pursued. When diabetes is uncontrolled, it has dire consequences for health and well-being. In addition, diabetes and its complications impact harshly on the finances of individuals and their families, and the economies of nations. People with diabetes who depend on life-saving insulin pay the ultimate price when access to affordable insulin is lacking. In an effort to address this growing health challenge, since early this decade world leaders have committed to reducing the burden of diabetes as one of four priority noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). As part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States have set an ambitious target to reduce premature mortality from NCDs – including diabetes – by one third; achieve universal health coverage; and provide access to affordable essential medicines – all by 2030. We have an enormous task at hand, which is why I welcome this first WHO Global report on diabetes. The report makes an important contribution to our understanding of diabetes and its consequences. It advances our understanding of trends in diabetes prevalence, of the contribution of high blood glucose (including diabetes) to premature mortality, and of what action governments are taking to prevent and control diabetes. From the analysis it is clear we need stronger responses not only fr Continue reading >>

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland Correspondence Address: Gojka Roglic Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Avenue Appia 20, 1211 Geneva Switzerland Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None The first WHO Global Report on Diabetes was launched on World Health Day 7 th April 2016 which was dedicated to Diabetes (1). Diabetes has been described in ancient scripts and recognized as a serious illness, but it does not appear to have been frequently encountered by physicians or healers. It is in the past few decades that human health and development is increasingly affected by the rising numbers of people with this condition. Diabetes, together with cardiovascular disease, cancer and chronic respiratory disease has been targeted in the Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) at the Un High-level Political Meeting in 2011. In 2013 WHO member states endorsed a global monitoring framework for noncommunicable diseases, with 9 targets to be reached by 2025. Diabetes and its key risk factors are strongly reflected in the targets and indicators - reduction of exposure to unhealthy diet and physical inactivity, zero rise in the prevalence of diabetes, improved access to treatment and reduction of premature mortality. As part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States have set an ambitious target to reduce premature mortality from NCDs - including diabetes - by one third; achieve universal health coverage; and provide access to affordable essential medicines - all by 2030( Keywords: Diabetes, global report, Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin. In the past three decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself. For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. Continue reading >>

Global Report On Diabetes 2016

Global Report On Diabetes 2016

HOME / RESOURCES / This report by the World Health Organization (WHO) covers the global burden, complications, economic impact, prevention, and management of diabetes. This first-ever WHO global diabetes report outlines the capacity for prevention and control of diabetes at the country level as well as access to insulin and other essential medicines. The key message of the report is the need to increase prevention and treatment of the disease through measures including expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, such as physical activity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions. Additional resources accompanying the report include an executive summary, an infographic, and country profiles. A WHO fact sheet on diabetes is also available. Source: Global Report on Diabetes 2016. World Health Organization 2016. Continue reading >>

Clinical Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Regulation And Safety Of Cordyceps Cicadae Mycelium

Clinical Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Regulation And Safety Of Cordyceps Cicadae Mycelium

1Department of Food Science, Nutrition, and Nutraceutical Biotechnology, Shin Chien University, Taipei City, Taiwan 2Institute of Food Science and Technology, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan;Department of Bioscience Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan;Insitute of Biotechnology, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua County, Taiwan 3School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan 4Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Chinese Culture University, Taipei City, Taiwan 5Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taiwan 6Grape King Bio Ltd, Taoyuan City 320, Taiwan 7Super Laboratory Co. Ltd., New Taipei City, Taiwan 8Nutrition Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2017, Vol. 5 No. 2, 137-143 Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing Cite this paper: Chin-Chu Chen, Te-Chih Wong, Chen-Ling Huang, Bo-Yi Jhou, Jui-Hsia Hsu, Shu-Hsing Yeh, Yueh-Ting Tsai, Shwu-Huey Yang. Clinical Evaluation of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Cordyceps cicadae Mycelium. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2017; 5(2):137-143. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-5-2-10. Correspondence to: Shwu-Huey Yang, School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Email: [email protected] Abstract Cordyceps cicadae (C. cicadae) is one of the most valued traditional Chinese medicines and have been used for about 1600 years in China. It is edible and is used traditionally for vision improvement, renal protection, cancer treatment and regulation of blood cholesterol and blood glucose. The aim of this Continue reading >>

Global Report On Diabetes

Global Report On Diabetes

The first WHO Global report on diabetes demonstrates that the number of adults living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity. In 2012 alone diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths. Its complications can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. The lack of access to affordable insulin remains a key impediment to successful treatment and results in needless complications and premature deaths. Insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents are reported as generally available in only a minority of low-income countries. Moreover, essential medicines critical to gaining control of diabetes, such as agents to lower blood pressure and lipid levels, are frequently unavailable in low- and middle-income countries. Policy and programme interventions are needed to improve equitable access. The new report calls upon governments to ensure that people are able to make healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose, treat and care for people with diabetes. It encourages us all as individuals to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain. Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Premium Statistics on "Diabetes" Related Studies: Available to Download in PDF or PPTX Format Everything On "Diabetes" in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References. Statista for Your Company: The Research and Analysis Tool Further Content: Statistics, Studies, and Topic Pages Our Business Solutions: Save Time and Money * All products require an annual contract. Prices do not include sales tax (New York residents only). Continue reading >>

The Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

The Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Common health risks, associated symptoms, and impact on healthcare costs Diabetes, a disease affecting blood glucose control, is a growing issue worldwide. From 1980 to 2014, the number of people affected by diabetes almost quadrupled from 108 million to 422 million worldwide, or a growth in diabetes prevalence of 4.7% to 8.5%.1 This growth trend is not estimated to stop or slow in the future, according to the IDF Diabetes Atlas, by 2040 the number of worldwide diabetics are expected to grow to 642 million, representing a potential future healthcare crisis for patients and providers alike.2 The healthcare costs are also expected to balloon. In the years between 2007 and 2012, the total healthcare costs associated with diabetes rose from $174 billion to $245 billion, or 41% in just a 5-year period.3 The majority of diabetes cases occur in developing countries, representing a high proportion of the disease’s economic burden. Prevalence of diabetes in Asian countries is particularly high and expected to increase.4 In fact, 60% of the world’s diabetic population are concentrated in Asian countries, with socio-economic growth, industrialization, and urbanization being three of the most common factors associated with increased prevalence of the disease.4 Diabetes is also growing in potentially epidemic proportions in India where over 62 million people are affected.5,6 Genetic factors, improved living standards, and rising levels of obesity are some of the many reasons associated diabetes is growing in this geographic region.7 Diabetes: health effects The short- and long-term health effects associated with diabetes are many, and each of these health effects worsen with poor glycemic control. Managing diabetes appropriately with prescribed therapies, diet, and lifestyle cha Continue reading >>

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