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Glipizide And Metformin Taken Together

Should You Take Diabetes Medications Metformin And Glipizide With Food?

Should You Take Diabetes Medications Metformin And Glipizide With Food?

Dear Pharmacist, I have been taking metformin for years now. I was already told to take it with food, but after taking it for a while I quit eating with it and seem to have no problems. My doctor recently added a medication called glipizide, which also says take with food. Can I eventually quit eating with this medication, too since I’m just not really a breakfast eater? Dear Most Important Part of your Day, This is a great question, as I can see how the two medications can seem like very similar situations. The directions to take these medications with food are for different reasons, and therefore should be followed differently. Metformin is advised to take with food because it can cause nausea when you first start taking it. For many people, however the nausea can subside as your body adjusts to it. With glipizide, the medication actually works to directly lower your blood sugar more than metformin. For this reason, it is important to always and forever eat with your glipizide dose. Unlike metformin, glipizide can cause low blood sugar episodes, especially when you don’t eat with it. If you absolutely never eat breakfast, then you may consider just waiting to take your glipizide with your first meal of the day. Even if that’s at lunch, it would be safer than taking this medication on an empty stomach. If you do experience a low blood sugar episode (clammy, sweaty palms, heat/cold intolerance, mental confusion) the best treatments can involve drinking orange juice or milk, a non-diet soda, or placing a piece of hard candy (that is not sugar free) in your mouth. If the episode is severe, it can also be a good idea to follow up with a bite of peanut butter, or some longer source of protein. Continue reading >>

Why Some Diabetics Gain Weight - And What You Can Do To Drop The Pounds

Why Some Diabetics Gain Weight - And What You Can Do To Drop The Pounds

One of the worst things a diabetic can do is gain weight. Unfortunately, that?s exactly what many of them do - even if they eat right, get plenty of exercise, and take their medications. What they don?t realize is that those medications may be the reason they?re gaining weight. Weight gain is a common side effect from oral anti-diabetic drugs. These include Glucotrol or glipizide. Glipizide triggers the pancreas to secrete insulin and use it efficiently. This lowers your blood sugar levels. The good news is you can avoid this weight gain or melt away those extra pounds by taking enough of a safe supplement. And you can find it in any health food store. The nutrient is chromium. You may be familiar with using chromium to help regulate blood sugar. In fact, you?re probably taking a few hundred micrograms of it already. But this isn?t nearly enough to cancel out this weight gain. You may need to take much more. In a study published in Diabetes Care, researchers followed a few dozen patients with type-2 diabetes. All of them were taking glipizide. They gave half of them 1,000 mcg of chromium picolinate a day for six months. Most multivitamins have only 200 mcg. They gave the control group a placebo along with glipizide. Continued Below... How to beat almost any health problem... by rejuvenating every single cell in your body! This European breakthrough can reverse the effects of aging in your body's cells. Studies show it leads to healthier cholesterol, a sharper memory, a stronger liver and more. At the end of the study, the patients who took glipizide with the placebo gained about five pounds. They also had substantially more abdominal and body fat. Those who took the chromium gained either nothing or up to two pounds, had a significant loss of body fat, and had lower blo Continue reading >>

Synergistic Interaction Between Metformin And Sulfonylureas On Diclofenac-induced Antinociception Measured Using The Formalin Test In Rats

Synergistic Interaction Between Metformin And Sulfonylureas On Diclofenac-induced Antinociception Measured Using The Formalin Test In Rats

Synergistic interaction between metformin and sulfonylureas on diclofenac-induced antinociception measured using the formalin test in rats 1rea Acadmica de Medicina del Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autnoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca; 2Departamento de Postgrado de la Universidad del Ftbol y Ciencias del Deporte, San Agustn Tlaxiaca, Hidalgo, Mexico 1rea Acadmica de Medicina del Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autnoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca; 2Departamento de Postgrado de la Universidad del Ftbol y Ciencias del Deporte, San Agustn Tlaxiaca, Hidalgo, Mexico Correspondence: Dr Mario I Ortiz, Laboratorio de Farmacologa, rea Acadmica de Medicina del Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autnoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Eliseo Ramrez Ulloa 400, Col. Doctores. Pachuca, Hidalgo 42090, Mexico. Telephone 52-77-1717-2000 ext 2361, fax 52-77-1717-2000 ext 2361, e-mail [email protected]_i_oiram Copyright 2013, Pulsus Group Inc. All rights reserved There is evidence that biguanides and sulfonylureas block diclofenac-induced antinociception (DIA) in rat models. However, little is known about the interaction between these hypoglycemics with respect to DIA. To determine whether metformin-sulfonylurea combinations affect DIA during the formalin test. Rats received the appropriate vehicle or diclofenac before 1% formaldehyde was injected into the paw. Rats were also pretreated with vehicle, glibenclamide, glipizide, metformin or glibenclamide/metformin and glipizide/metformin combinations before the diclofenac and formaldehyde injections, and the effect on antinociception was assessed. Isobolograms of the combinations were constructed to test for a synergistic interaction. Systemic injection of diclofenac resulted in antinociception durin Continue reading >>

Glipizide

Glipizide

Glipizide is used along with diet and exercise, and sometimes with other medications, to treat type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). Glipizide is in a class of medications called sulfonylureas. Glipizide lowers blood sugar by causing the pancreas to produce insulin (a natural substance that is needed to break down sugar in the body) and helping the body use insulin efficiently. This medication will only help lower blood sugar in people whose bodies produce insulin naturally. Glipizide is not used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious condition that may occur if high blood sugar is not treated). Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Taking medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Glipizide comes as tablets and extended-release (long-acting) tablets to take by mouth. The regular tablet is usually taken one or more times a day, 30 minutes before breakfast Continue reading >>

Metaglip, (glipizide-metformin) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Metaglip, (glipizide-metformin) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Discontinue metformin at the time of or before an iodinated contrast imaging procedure in patients with an eGFR between 30-60 mL/minute/1.73 m; in patients with a history of liver disease, alcoholism, or heart failure; or in patients who will be administered intra-arterial iodinate contrast Characterized by elevated blood lactate levels (>5 mmol/L) Rare but serious complication that can occur because of metformin accumulation; increased risk with sepsis, dehydration, excess alcohol intake, hepatic insufficiency, renal impairment, and acute congestive heart failure Subtle onset with nonspecific symptoms (eg, malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, nonspecific abdominal distress) Monitor lab for decreased serum pH, increased anion gap, and elevated blood lactate If suspected, discontinue drug and hospitalize patient immediately Metformin is highly dialyzable (clearance up to 170 mL/min under good hemodynamic conditions); prompt hemodialysis is recommended to correct the acidosis and to remove accumulated metformin Severe renal disease: eGFR <30 ml/min/1.73 m Metabolic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis Rare but serious lactic acidosis can occur due to accumulation of metformin Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dihydrogenase deficiency may be at risk of sulfonylurea induced hemolytic anemia Discontinue metformin at the time of or before an iodinated contrast imaging procedure in patients with an eGFR between 30-60 mL/minute/1.73 m; in patients with a history of liver disease, alcoholism, or heart failure; or in patients who will be administered intra-arterial iodinate contrast Reevaluate eGFR 48 hr after the imaging procedure; restart metformin if renal function is stable Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip Has Been Discontinued In The Us)

Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip Has Been Discontinued In The Us)

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

How Glipizide Might Help With Your Type 2 Diabetes Management

How Glipizide Might Help With Your Type 2 Diabetes Management

Glipizide is an oral medication that is used to treat Type 2 diabetes. The drug is available in immediate-release tablets and extended-release tablets. Patients who currently take the medication as part of their diabetes treatment state that Glipizide has helped with lowering their blood sugar levels, and it seems that the extended-release tablets are favored over the immediate-release tablets. One of the main benefits from the drug is that it helps to lower your A1C levels by 1-2%. We will discuss the benefits and the downsides of Glipizide in more detail below. What is Glipizide? Glipizide is an oral medication used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is available in brand-name form as well as generic form, with the brand-names being Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL. Glipizide works by helping your pancreas produce more of your body’s natural insulin, which in turn regulates your blood sugar levels. Glipizide is used in conjunction with diet and exercise as part of a diabetes management plan. Glipizide is part of a class of diabetes drugs known as Sulfonylureas, which are designed to help your body’s pancreas to produce more of the body’s natural insulin. Diabetes medication aren’t designed to cure your Type 2 diabetes, but instead they are designed to treat the symptoms of diabetes, including blurry vision, excessive hunger, excessive thirst, frequent urination and sores that won’t heal. Further reading: Usually, the first diabetes medication that your doctor may prescribe is Metformin. However, many times, Glipizide is a popular choice for doctors to prescribe because many patients find that their bodies tolerate Glipizide better than Metformin. What are the Benefits of Glipizide? Glipizide can help lower your A1C levels by an average of 1-2%. Since Glipizid Continue reading >>

Glipizide-metformin

Glipizide-metformin

Uses This diabetes medication is a combination of 2 drugs (glipizide and metformin). It is used along with a diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glipizide is a sulfonylurea and works by stimulating the release of your body's natural insulin and by decreasing the amount of sugar that your liver makes. Metformin is a biguanide and works by decreasing the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Both of these medications work by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. How to use Glipizide-Metformin Read the Patient Information Leaflet available from your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth, usually once or twice a day with meals or as directed by your doctor. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (e.g., chlorpropamide), follow your docto Continue reading >>

Glipizide-metformin Side Effects

Glipizide-metformin Side Effects

Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. You should not use glipizide and metformin if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glipizide and metformin. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Stop taking this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to glipizide or metformin, or if you have: severe kidney disease; or metabolic acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glipizide and metformin. To make sure glipizide and metformin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: kidney disease; congestive heart failure, especially if you take digoxin (Lanoxin) or furosemide (Lasix); a genetic enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency; liver disease; heart disease; or if you are over 80 years old and have not Continue reading >>

Can Januvia And Glipizide Be Taken Together Safely?

Can Januvia And Glipizide Be Taken Together Safely?

Community Answers No, The two drugs are virtually identical. If both of the drugs are taken together may potentiate the risk of hypoglycemia. Yes Januvia can be taken with any other medication for Type 2 diabetes. There are studies in the prescribing information of januvia used in combination with glipizide, metformin, insulin. There are no contraindications to take the two products together, however, it is recommended to closely monitor patients hypoglycemia when januvia is used together with any sulfolyurea like glipizide. I take glipizide, metformin at their max dose and januvia (a newbie med). My diabetes is still out of control. my weight does not change. I eat no refined sugars. In the last 18 months my digestion has changed so dramatically that I can eat nothing but bland foods (mostly cereals). Know more here READ THESE NEXT: Can a new diabetes drug also help my mother lose weight? Essential Info About Type 2 Diabetes Drugs When Blood Sugar High Continue reading >>

Metaglip Patient Information Including Side Effects

Metaglip Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Metaglip Generic Name: glipizide and metformin (Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min) What is the most important information I should know about glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? What is glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion, swelling or rapid weight gain; pain or burning with urination; nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Metaglip Descriptions Glipizide and Metformin combination is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. Normally, after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body store excess sugar for later use. This process occurs during normal digestion of food. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not work properly to store the excess sugar and the sugar remains in your bloodstream. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future. Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes but often medicines are needed to help your body. With two actions, the combination of glipizide and metformin helps your body cope with high blood sugar. Glipizide stimulates the release of insulin from the pancreas, directing your body to store blood sugar. Metformin has three different actions: it slows the absorption of sugar in your small intestine; it also stops your liver from converting stored sugar into blood sugar; and it helps your body use your natural insulin more efficiently. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Copyright © 2018 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

What Is Glipizide / Metformin?

What Is Glipizide / Metformin?

QUICK LINKS Oral route (Tablet) Lactic acidosis is a rare, but serious, metabolic complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation during treatment with glipiZIDE/metformin hydrochloride; when it occurs, it is fatal in approximately 50% of cases. The risk of lactic acidosis increases with renal impairment, increased age, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, hepatic insufficiency, and other conditions whenever there is significant tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxemia. Treatment with glipiZIDE/metformin hydrochloride should not be initiated in patients 80 years of age or older unless measurement of creatinine clearance demonstrates that renal function is normal. Therapy should temporarily be discontinued prior to any intravascular radiocontrast study or surgical procedure. Avoid excessive alcohol use since alcohol potentiates the effects of metformin on lactate metabolism. Discontinue therapy immediately and institute supportive measures promptly for suspected lactic acidosis . Save up to 75% on Glipizide / Metformin Find big savings at pharmacies near you with GoodRx discount coupons Average Retail Price: $56.08 Lowest GoodRx Price $13.80 View All Prices Glipizide and Metformin combination is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. Normally, after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body store excess sugar for later use. This process occurs during normal digestion of food. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not work properly to store the excess sugar and the sugar remains in your bloodstream. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future. Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes but often medicines are needed Continue reading >>

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

Diabetes can definitely be a challenging condition to manage, especially when it comes to medications. If you are diabetic, there are five key things you need to do to get the most health benefits from your prescriptions. Guest post by: Mike Shelley Fourth Year Pharmacy Student Northeast Ohio Medical University As I approach the start of my career as a pharmacist at a community pharmacy, I look forward to the opportunity to help people understand and use their medications as wisely as possible. If you or someone you love is diabetic, I’d like to offer these tips, guidelines and recommendations for managing this condition. #1 — Keep a list of your medications with you. Keeping track of your medications can be a difficult task. Making a list is a great way to help you remember which medications you are taking and how you take them. Here are some things you should include for each medication on your list: Medication name (brand and/or generic) Medication strength Directions Prescriber For example, you might write down: Metformin (Glucophage) 500 mg, 1 tablet twice a day, Dr. Smith; or Lantus insulin, inject 30 units daily at bedtime, Dr. Wheeler. You may also want to add your emergency contact information, as well as the pharmacies you go to in case of an emergency. Also, make sure you update your list as changes are made to your medications! #2 — Be familiar with the medications you take. There are many medication options available to help lower your blood sugar; your doctor decides which medications are best for you based on your lifestyle, physical condition, how you respond to medications, and insurance coverage. Below are examples of each class of oral anti-diabetes medications and generic and brand names of each. Medication Class Medications Sulfonylureas Chlor Continue reading >>

Comparable Reduction In A1c Levels Vs Combination Glipizide + Metformin

Comparable Reduction In A1c Levels Vs Combination Glipizide + Metformin

Primary end point: Mean reduction in A1C levels were noninferior to combination therapy with glipizide + metformin at 52 weeks1,2,a Values are last observation carried forward and represent adjusted mean change from baseline. aPatients on metformin ≥1500 mg per day were randomized following a 2-week placebo lead-in period to glipizide 5 mg or dapagliflozin 2.5 mg and were up-titrated over 18 weeks to optimal glycemic effect (FPG <110 mg/dL) or to the highest dose level (up to glipizide 20 mg and dapagliflozin 10 mg) as tolerated by patients. At the end of the titration period, 87% of patients treated with dapagliflozin had been titrated to the maximum study dose (10 mg) vs 73% treated with glipizide (20 mg). Dapagliflozin 2.5 mg is not an FDA-approved dose. BL=mean baseline. Values are last observation carried forward and represent adjusted mean change from baseline. bThe discrepancy between the weight change between treatments and the total weight change results from rounding. cP<0.0001. Hypotension: Dapagliflozin causes intravascular volume contraction, and symptomatic hypotension can occur. Assess and correct volume status before initiating XIGDUO XR in patients with impaired renal function, elderly patients, or patients on loop diuretics. Monitor for hypotension. 7 patients taking dapagliflozin + metformin experienced minore hypoglycemia vs 147 patients taking glipizide + metformin over 52 weeks1,2 No patients taking dapagliflozin + metformin experienced majorf hypoglycemia over 52 weeks vs 3 patients taking glipizide + metformin1,2 eMinor episodes of hypoglycemia were defined as either a symptomatic episode with a capillary or plasma glucose measurement <63 mg/dL, regardless of need for external assistance or an asymptomatic capillary or plasma glucose measuremen Continue reading >>

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