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Ginseng And Diabetes

Ginseng Does Not Improve Blood Sugar Processing

Ginseng Does Not Improve Blood Sugar Processing

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Swallowing ginseng root extract has no effect on blood sugar regulation among people with diabetes or prediabetic symptoms, a new study concludes. Despite prior evidence that the herb might help treat problems processing blood sugar, the researchers were unable to even detect ginseng compounds in the participants’ bloodstream after they took it. They also saw no differences in the subjects’ blood sugar. “We think you don’t absorb enough of it to have an effect,” said Dr. Samuel Klein, a professor at the Washington University School of Medicine and the study’s senior author. He and his colleagues gave 15 people Korean ginseng root extract, or the active chemical in ginseng, called ginsenoside Re, or a fake ginseng pill for 4 weeks. All the people who participated were overweight or obese and had recently received a diagnosis of type II diabetes or had developed a precursor to diabetes called impaired glucose tolerance. Those who ingested the ginseng extract took 3 grams (about a teaspoon) each day for 2 weeks, then 8 grams each day for another 2 weeks. The ginsenoside Re group took 250 mg (roughly the same weight as a vitamin pill) each day for 2 weeks, then 500 mg for the next 2 weeks. Klein said these doses were on the high end of what people would ordinarily take. Before and after the 4-week treatment, the researchers gathered information on how well the participants regulated their blood sugar and how sensitive they were to insulin, the hormone that helps the body use sugar in the blood. None of the measurements were different after taking ginseng root, ginsenoside Re or the placebo for 4 weeks. And when Klein’s team looked for evidence of ginseng in the bloodstream, they couldn’t detect it. “We don’t think we got a bad Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Panax Ginseng Berry Extract And The Identification Of An Effective Component

Antidiabetic Effects Of Panax Ginseng Berry Extract And The Identification Of An Effective Component

We evaluated antihyperglycemic and anti-obese effects of Panax ginseng berry extract and its major constituent, ginsenoside Re, in obese diabetic C57BL/6J ob/ ob mice and their lean littermates. Animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of Panax ginseng berry extract for 12 days. On day 12, 150 mg/kg extract–treated ob/ob mice became normoglycemic (137 ± 6.7 mg/dl) and had significantly improved glucose tolerance. The overall glucose excursion during the 2-h intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test decreased by 46% (P < 0.01) compared with vehicle-treated ob/ob mice. The improvement in blood glucose levels in the extract-treated ob/ ob mice was associated with a significant reduction in serum insulin levels in fed and fasting mice. A hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study revealed a more than twofold increase in the rate of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in treated ob/ ob mice (112 ± 19.1 vs. 52 ± 11.8 μmol · kg−1 · min−1 for the vehicle group, P < 0.01). In addition, the extract-treated ob/ob mice lost a significant amount of weight (from 51.7 ± 1.9 g on day 0 to 45.7 ± 1.2 on day 12, P < 0.01 vs. vehicle-treated ob/ob mice), associated with a significant reduction in food intake (P < 0.05) and a very significant increase in energy expenditure (P < 0.01) and body temperature (P < 0.01). Treatment with the extract also significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels in ob/ob mice. Additional studies demonstrated that ginsenoside Re plays a significant role in antihyperglycemic action. This antidiabetic effect of ginsenoside Re was not associated with body weight changes, suggesting that other constituents in the extract have distinct pharmacological mechanisms on energy metabolism. Diabetes is a major health problem, affecting ∼5% of the tota Continue reading >>

How Ginseng Works - Diabetes

How Ginseng Works - Diabetes

Ginseng has been commonly used in Oriental medicine to treat diabetes-like conditions, and the earliest recorded reference for this purpose is in the Compendium of Materia Medica (Ben Cao Gang Mu) by Dr Li in Ming Dynasty China (1368-1644). This is the most complete and comprehensive pre-modern herbal textbook. It is also recommended and used in North America for this purpose. There is a large body of scientific evidence on the beneficial effect of American ginseng for use in the management of diabetes and enhanced energy metabolism in the body in non-diabetic people. Much of this is from randomized placebo-controlled trials in people. There are numerous published scientific studies on American ginseng's mode of action in normalizing blood glucose. Although not fully understood, it appears to act in two ways. Firstly by improving sensitivity to insulin due to a sulfonylurea-like activity. This helps move glucose from the blood stream into the cells of the body where it is needed. Secondly, American ginseng has been found to increase the production of insulin by pancreatic B cells, and also reduce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in these cells. Research in the USA demonstrates that American ginseng root powder significantly (p < 0.05) reduces post-prandial glucose in people with Type-2 diabetes, and also improves glucose tolerance in non-diabetic people. The dose generally used was 1 to 3 grams, and increasing this dose did not appear to confer addition benefit. A 2003 review published in the US journal Diabetes Care examined all available clinical studies on herbal, vitamin and mineral supplements claimed to influence glycaemic control (that were published in English).108 trials were examined, and the quality of randomised placebo-controlled trials was assessed using Continue reading >>

Diabetic? Stop Blood Sugar From Spiking With Red Ginseng

Diabetic? Stop Blood Sugar From Spiking With Red Ginseng

Adult-onset (type 2) diabetes is so common that it ultimately impacts a whopping one in four people age 65 and older. In this type of diabetes, blood sugar can go way up—or “spike”—after a meal. You’ll know your blood sugar is spiking because instead of feeling energized and fit after nourishing yourself, you’ll just crash. More than just wanting to take a nap—you won’t be able to do anything but. That’s right. You’ll have to take a rest after eating a meal because you will feel sleepy…exhausted. Your eyes may even blur. If this happens often enough, hardening of the arteries can occur, which, as you know, can lead to a heart attack. But you can prevent this from happening naturally. Red ginseng extract may be just the thing to keep blood sugar on an even keel. Why is it called “red” ginseng? Tonics, extracts and teas of Asian white ginseng (also called Chinese or Korean white panax ginseng) are natural powerhouses of health and vitality made from the raw dried root of the plant. They increase energy and stamina, reduce cholesterol and blood pressure and fight cancer and aging. But steaming the root before drying it starts a fermentation process that supports wellness even more. Once fermented, the ginseng is called red ginseng, and this is the kind that is especially good for people with diabetes and others who have problems with glucose control. Korean researchers have recently confirmed that red ginseng significantly reduces blood glucose levels and increases insulin levels after meals. That makes it especially helpful in preventing dangerous spikes in blood sugar that can happen after diabetics or borderline diabetics have a meal. The researchers recruited 42 healthy men and women between the ages of 20 and 75 for their study. Nineteen of t Continue reading >>

American Ginseng

American Ginseng

Overview The name "ginseng" is used to refer to both American (Panax quinquefolius) and Asian or Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng), which belong to the genus Panax and have a somewhat similar chemical makeup. Both Asian and American ginseng contain ginsenosides, which are the substances thought to give ginseng its medicinal properties. But they contain different types in different amounts. Siberian ginseng, or Eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus), is an entirely different plant with different effects. It is distantly related to ginseng, but it does not contain the same active ingredients. Like Asian ginseng, American ginseng is a light tan, gnarled root that often looks like a human body with stringy shoots for arms and legs. Native Americans used the root as a stimulant and to treat headaches, fever, indigestion, and infertility. Ginseng remains one of the most popular herbs in the United States. Ginseng is sometimes called an "adaptogen," meaning it is an herb that helps the body deal with various kinds of stress, although there is no scientific evidence to prove the benefit of adaptogens. Most ginseng studies have used Panax ginseng (Asian ginseng). There is some evidence that Panax ginseng may: Help boost the immune system Reduce the risk of cancer Improve mental performance and well being Laboratory studies in animals have found that American ginseng is effective in boosting the immune system, and as an antioxidant. Other studies show that American ginseng might have therapeutic potential for inflammatory diseases. Research on American ginseng has focused on a number of conditions, including the following. Diabetes Several human studies show that American ginseng lowered blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. The effect was seen both on fasting blood sug Continue reading >>

Ginseng On Hyperglycemia: Effects And Mechanisms

Ginseng On Hyperglycemia: Effects And Mechanisms

Go to: Introduction Due to a 3-fold increase in the consumption of herbal remedies in the United States along with a staggering popularity of the ginseng herb as a method of sustaining good health, significant focus have been placed on two widely used types of ginseng, American (Panax quinquefolius L.) (1) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng CA Meyer) (2–4). The usage of ginseng root for medicinal purposes have been recorded for millennia, known as a tonic capable of sustaining longevity as well as maintaining viability (5,6). The two species display different effects, possibly due to the different active chemical makeup of each other. Asian ginseng is said to facilitate blood flow, alleviate fatigue as well as relieve oxidative stress in diabetic conditions through various mechanisms such as the inhibition of lipid peroxidation (7) (Table 1). American ginseng has been reported to have stress-relieving qualities, anti-aging effects and aids in digestion (3). Clinical studies have reported that ginseng improves psychological function, immune function and conditions associated with diabetes (8). Ginseng root has been reported to treat diabetic symptoms in the Compendium of Materia Medica (Ben Cao Gang Mu) by Dr Li (Li, ShiZhen, Ming Dynasty from 1368 to 1644, in China). This is the most complete and comprehensive pre-moderm herbal textbook. The symptom was called Xiao Ke described as over eating, drinking and losing energy, body weight which are typical diabetic symptoms in modern medicine. Common methods of treatment for hyperglycemia (high glucose) include both mono-therapy and combination therapy with insulin, metformin, rosiglitazone and acarbose. These treatments have been shown to help control blood glucose levels but do not solve the problem–no pancreatic β-cell Continue reading >>

Ginseng

Ginseng

An herbal folk remedy for various ailments that is made from several species of plants in the genus Panax. The root of ginseng is dried and used to make capsules, tablets, extracts, teas, and creams. Ginseng has been promoted for improving the health of people recovering from illness, increasing a sense of well-being and stamina, improving mental performance, treating erectile dysfunction, and lowering blood glucose and blood pressure, although there is no definitive scientific evidence to support these claims. To date, only a few large clinical trials have been conducted with ginseng, and most of these have had design flaws. The uses with the greatest scientific support are lowering blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes and improving mental performance. A number of studies suggest that ginseng can modestly improve thinking or learning ability, although some studies have failed to show this effect. Several other studies suggest that ginseng may lower blood glucose levels in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. However, it isn’t clear what the long-term effects are and what doses are safe and effective. Health experts stress that no one should use ginseng in place of proven medicines, such as insulin or oral diabetes pills, prescribed by their diabetes care provider. The most common side effects of ginseng are headaches, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal problems, although ginseng has been known to provoke allergic reactions as well. Because of the blood-glucose-lowering potential of ginseng and the accompanying possibility of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose), people with diabetes must be especially cautious about using it. As always, be sure to let your health-care team know about any dietary supplements you take, including ginseng. Continue reading >>

The Efficacy Of Red Ginseng In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Animals

The Efficacy Of Red Ginseng In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Animals

Copyright © 2013 Bin Na Hong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most modern chronic metabolic diseases in the world. Moreover, DM is one of the major causes of modern neurological diseases. In the present study, the therapeutic actions of Korean red ginseng were evaluated in type 1 and type 2 diabetic mouse models using auditory electrophysiological measurement. The comprehensive results from auditory brainstem response (ABR), auditory middle latency response (AMLR), and transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) demonstrate auditory functional damage caused by type 1 or 2 DM. Korean red ginseng improved the hearing threshold shift, delayed latencies and signal intensity decrease in type 2 diabetic mice. Type 1 diabetic mice showed a partial improvement in decreasing amplitude and signal intensity, not significantly. We suggest that the Korean red ginseng has a more potent efficacy in hearing loss in insulin resistance type 2 diabetes than in type 1 diabetes. 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common modern chronic metabolic diseases in the world. Moreover, DM is a cause of modern chronic neurological disease. Recently, many studies have reported that hearing impairment could be caused by DM [1]. In our previous study, hearing impairment was found in streptozotocin (STZ-) induced diabetic mouse models as caused by type 1 diabetes. STZ-induced DM may impair the auditory pathway from the peripheral auditory nerve to the midbrain in mouse models [2]. Additionally, chronic hyperglycemia and obesity found in type 2 diab Continue reading >>

Asian Ginseng And American Ginseng

Asian Ginseng And American Ginseng

Ginseng is a root that has been used formedicinal purposes for centuries. There aretwo different forms that have been used fordiabetes: Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A.Meyer) as well as American ginseng (Panaxquinquefolius L). Research presented at the 2003 ADAScientific Sessions in New Orleans, Louisiana,found that the addition of American ginsengto conventional treatment for type 2 diabetessignificantly decreased A1C levels. Both Asian and American ginsengs havebeen used for diabetes and for othermedicinal purposes. Both are also used asan “adaptogen” to help the patient copewith stress and to increase energy. Bothtypes are used in cosmetics and as flavoringingredients in different foods. Asian ginsengis used to enhance thinking and memory andto prevent colds or flu. Asian ginseng is alsoused to treat erectile dysfunction. Advice for Patients Patients should be aware that there aredifferent ginseng varieties, but two maintypes are used for diabetes (Asian andAmerican). The doses vary depending on thetype of ginseng used. Both ginsengs havebeen studied only in relation totype 2 diabetes. One major concern with ginseng is that theremay be problems with the manufacturingprocess: One study found that what is printedon the label may not reflect what is actuallyin the bottle. An evaluation found thatginseng content varied from less (12 percent)to more (137 percent) than was indicated onthe bottle. Ginseng should not be used in children or inpregnant or lactating women. Ginseng is available in capsules, tablets, teasand liquid extracts. Q: What is the differencebetween the different types ofginseng available? A: You may have heard abouttwo different types of ginseng, Asian andAmerican. Asian and American ginsengs have both been used to treat diabetes, but thedoses diffe Continue reading >>

Ginseng For Diabetes Control

Ginseng For Diabetes Control

Ads by Google Ginseng a magical herb trusted for over 5000 years for its ability to promote vigor, nourish the nervous system, enhances hormonal secretion, lower blood sugar & cholesterol, and increases immunity. Ginseng is a slow-growing perennial plant with fleshy roots of the genus Panax family Araliaceae. Ginseng is suitable for cooler climates, found in the Northern Hemisphere, in North America and eastern Asia (Korea, North China, and eastern Siberia). Ginseng is one of the most highly regarded medicinal plants gained the reputation of being able to promote health, general body vigor and prolong life. Ginseng can also be useful to treat diabetes and cholesterol. Ginseng lower sugar level The hypoglycemic activity of ginseng may be due to the enhancement of aerobic glycolysis through stimulation of beta-adrenoceptor and increase of various rate-limiting enzyme activities related to tricarboxylic acid cycle. Initial studies have shown that ginseng increases insulin production and reduces cell death in pancreatic beta cells. Also, ginseng can decrease blood glucose in type II diabetes patients. Ginseng lower heart diseases and strokes risks Ginseng decreases endothelial cell (line the inside of blood vessels) dysfunction; it means disturbance to these cells lead to a heart attack or stroke. Thus, ginseng can provide protection against heart attack or stroke. Ginseng possesses blood-thinning property. Therefore, should use blood-thinning medication under the supervision of your doctor. Ginseng is considering raising blood pressure in the beginning days of treatment. Thus you need to be extra careful when start taking this herb at least for first few days. 20 Medicinal Uses of Ginseng The ginseng root has many benefits as listed below. Lower blood sugar - Ginseng appea Continue reading >>

Ginseng May Help Treat Diabetes

Ginseng May Help Treat Diabetes

June 16, 2003 (New Orleans) -- The herb red ginseng may help normalize blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, two new studies suggest. But before you rush to health-food stores to stock up on the popular herb, be aware that there is no way to know if the product you buy will be as effective as the preparation used in the studies, researchers caution. University of Toronto investigators presented both studies here this weekend at the American Diabetes Association's 63rd Scientific Sessions. Since normalizing blood sugar levels is a critical goal of diabetes treatment, ginseng could someday be an important strategy in managing patients, says Fran Kaufman, MD, president of the American Diabetes Association. In one study, people with type 2 diabetes who consumed ginseng and a highly viscous fiber similar to pectin had a notable reduction in blood sugar levels, reports Alexandra Jenkins, a PhD candidate at the University of Surrey, U.K. The study enrolled 30 people with diabetes in whom medication helped to control -- but did not normalize -- blood sugar levels. The participants received either capsules containing ground, North American-grown ginseng and a highly viscous fiber, or dummy capsules, three times a day for 12 weeks. After a four-week break, the participants switched to the alternate regimen; those who had received the ginseng capsules then took placebo and vice versa. Blood samples taken before and after each 12-week period showed that hemoglobin A1C -- a standard measure of blood sugar levels -- dropped into the normal range when participants were taking the ginseng capsules, but not when they were taking placebo, the study showed. The herbal preparation appeared to be safe, with no adverse effects. Moreover, ginseng appears to have an effect beyond medicat Continue reading >>

Ginseng And Diabetes: The Evidences From In Vitro, Animal And Human Studies

Ginseng And Diabetes: The Evidences From In Vitro, Animal And Human Studies

Go to: INTRODUCTION Despite enormous efforts to search for cure, diabetes mellitus (often simply referred to as diabetes) still remains as a formidable challenge for public health. As of 2000 at least 171 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes or 2.8% of the population [1], and the prevalence of diabetes will rise to 11.4% in 2030 [2,3]. The increased prevalence is likely attributable to rapid economic development, improved living standards, an aging population, and a westernized lifestyle. Epidemiological studies and clinical trials strongly support the notion that hyperglycemia is the principal cause of microvascular and macrovascular complications such as renal failure, neuropathy, retinopathy, coronary and cerebral artery diseases, and amputation. Therefore, effective blood glucose control is the key to preventing or reversing diabetic complications and improving quality of life in diabetic patients [4,5]. Although no cure is yet available for type 2 diabetes, oral hypoglycemic agents have been developed and are widely used. Current medications, however, are not adequately effective in maintaining long-term glycemic control in most patients, even when used in combination, leaving diabetics susceptible to developing life threatening and debilitating complications. Therefore, there is an urgent need for more potent and safe therapeutic agents with noble mechanisms of action [6]. In this context, the practice of diabetes prevention by use of herbal remedy is considered to be an alternative, but more realistic and fundamental strategy for the management of this dread disease. One of the promising medicinal plants with anti-diabetic potential is ginseng [7]. The English word ginseng derives from the Chinese term rénshēn (人蔘), literally ‘man root’ (referr Continue reading >>

Ginseng Reduces Insulin Resistance

Ginseng Reduces Insulin Resistance

Research out of China determines mechanism by which the medicinal herb may help improve glycemic control through activation of PPAR-γ pathway…. Currently diabetes mellitus affects almost 92 million people in China. Traditional Chinese medicine has used herbs medicinally for thousands of years and continues to do so today. Ginseng has been attributed to anti-diabetic properties and is commonly used by this culture in the prevention and treatment of the type 2 diabetes. Previous yet separate studies have found ginseng to significantly reduce insulin resistance and improve glucose control in both diabetic mice and obese mice. Panax ginseng berry extract in both 200mg and 400mg doses has been previously studied in humans leading to reductions in blood glucose. Steroid glycosides, known as ginsenosides, from Panax ginseng are believed to contribute to the anti-diabetic effects of the herb. What remains uncertain is the underlying mechanism by which ginseng reduces insulin resistance. From their research effort, Gao Y et al. now propose ginsenoside Re reduces insulin resistance through activation of PPAR-γ pathway and inhibition of TNF-α production. Researchers cultured murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes in order to determine the potential mechanism of action of the ginsenoside Re at the molecular level. The effect of ginsenoside was examined by measuring the concentrations level of triglycerides in the 3T3-L1 cells. By measuring 3H-2-deoxy-d-glucose levels, researchers were able to determine the amount of glucose uptake by the 3T3-L1 cells when stimulated by insulin in the presence of ginsenoside Re compared to control cells. Real time RT-PCR was used to analyze the effect of ginsenoside Re on the expression of genes for PPAR-γ, ap2, adiponectin, IRS-1 (Insulin receptor substrat Continue reading >>

Clinical Use Of Ginseng In Treatment Of Diabetes

Clinical Use Of Ginseng In Treatment Of Diabetes

Ginseng has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a wide variety of diseases. In this section we will discuss the evidence for use of ginseng in the treatment of diabetes. Background There are different species of ginseng, of which Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng) and Panax ginseng (Chinese ginseng) are the main species. The ginseng species belong to the genus Panax of the ivy family (Araliaceae). Panax ginseng can be classified according to how it is processed: fresh ginseng (less than 4 years old), white ginseng (4-6 years old and dried after peeling), and red ginseng (harvested at 6 years old and dried after peeling) [1] [2]. Evidence clinical use An electronic search on Medline using PubMed (12 May 2013) identified 89 publications [a]; 6 publications were randomised studies amongst patients with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance that compared ginseng to placebo [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]. Three studies reported beneficial effects on the fasting blood glucose [3] [5] [7]. Data on HbA1c were only measured or reported in three studies, but no beneficial effects were observed [3] [6] [8]. The search strategy also revealed a systematic review that had searched for studies investigating the effects of red ginseng. It was concluded that the evidence for the effectiveness of red ginseng in controlling glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus is not convincing [3]. Korean, Japanese and Chinese databases had also been searched by the authors. Only 4 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified, of which only one trial [9] was considered to have a low risk of bias, according to the Cochrane criteria. Red ginseng was compared to placebo in this trial and after 12 weeks of treatment no beneficial effects on the primary outcome, HbA1c, were ob Continue reading >>

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