diabetestalk.net

Gingivitis And Diabetes

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Periodontal (gum) Disease

Diabetes And Periodontal (gum) Disease

Diabetes that is not properly controlled can lead to periodontal (gum) diseases in both young and old people. Periodontal diseases are infections of the gums and bone that hold the teeth in place. Because of blood vessel changes that happen with diabetes, the efficiency of the flow of nutrients and removal of wastes from body tissues may become impaired. This impaired blood flow can weaken the gums and bone. This makes them more susceptible to infection. In addition, if diabetes is poorly controlled, higher glucose levels in the mouth fluids will encourage the growth of bacteria that can cause gum disease. Poor blood sugar control decreases the ability of the immune system to fight infections. On the other hand, uncontrolled periodontal disease may also make it more difficult to control the diabetes. A third factor, smoking, is harmful to oral health even for people without diabetes. However, a person with diabetes who smokes is at a much greater risk for gum disease than a person who does not have diabetes. Paired with poor oral hygiene, diabetes can lead to gingivitis, the first stage of periodontal disease, or to periodontitis, severe gum disease. What are the signs and symptoms of periodontal disease? The following are the most common signs and symptoms of gum disease. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Signs and symptoms may include: Red, swollen, tender gums Bleeding while brushing and/or flossing Receding gums Loose or separating teeth Persistent bad breath Dentures that no longer fit Pus between the teeth and gums A change in bite and jaw alignment The signs and symptoms of gum disease may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Talk with a dentist or other oral health specialist for a diagnosis. What are the different types of Continue reading >>

Does Periodontal Disease Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Does Periodontal Disease Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes has long been a risk factor for periodontal disease; new research may point to reverse causation. Diabetes has long been believed to be a risk factor for periodontal disease. Results of a new study show that the reverse might also be true, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Ryan T. Demmer, PhD, MPH, associate research scientist in the department of epidemiology, said that these findings add a “new twist” to the association, suggesting that periodontal disease may lead to diabetes. “It has been generally accepted that periodontal disease is a consequence of diabetes despite the fact that this association has not been studied with the same methodological rigor applied to coronary and stroke outcomes,” he told Endocrine Today. “We found that over two decades of follow-up, individuals who had periodontal disease were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life when compared to individuals without periodontal disease.” The researchers studied over 9,000 participants without diabetes from a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population, with more than 800 eventually developing diabetes. They then compared the risk of developing diabetes over the next 20 years between people with varying degrees of periodontal disease and found that individuals with elevated levels of periodontal disease were nearly twice as likely to become diabetic in that 20-year timeframe. Demmer said to keep an open mind about the results, however. “They certainly are thought-provoking, biologically plausible and supported by longstanding research regarding periodontal disease and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. While there are no immediate clinical implications that stem from these findings, they do suggest a Continue reading >>

Gum Disease And Diabetes: A Circular Relationship

Gum Disease And Diabetes: A Circular Relationship

You’re probably already aware that diabetes can have a negative impact on the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, nerves and other important systems in the body. But were you aware that it can also cause problems with your dental health? Research has shown a circular relationship between serious gum disease and diabetes. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to gum disease, but serious gum disease may make diabetes worse by affecting blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. How does diabetes affect the mouth? Glucose, the sugar linked to diabetes, is present in your saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, harmful bacteria grow due to high glucose levels in your saliva. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. High glucose levels = increase in plaque What happens if I have plaque? Gingivitis: A less severe form of gum disease, gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused by plaque buildup. If not brushed away, plaque hardens into a barnacle-like material to form calculus, commonly known as tartar. Just like lime deposits on a shower drain, the hardened calculus is difficult to remove. The biofilm, a sticky combination of germs and bacteria, will continue to grow and infect your gums, sometimes causing redness and bleeding you may or may not see. Periodontitis: Gingivitis, if left untreated, will progress to periodontitis. With periodontitis, calculus deposits expand on the surface of your teeth, edging down below your gum line. This condition causes your gums to separate slightly from the teeth and supporting bone, forming periodontal pockets. It creates swelling, bleeding, pain while chewing, teeth misalignment and looseness. Some patients also have sores inside the mouth, chronic bad br Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes And Periodontal Disease

The Connection Between Diabetes And Periodontal Disease

The Connection Between Diabetes and Periodontal Disease The Connection Between Diabetes and Periodontal Disease Dental hygienist with patient.Thinkstock Images/ GettyImages Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is one of the leading causes of tooth loss among adults and can result from poor diabetes control. In gum disease ,your gums, thedeeper supporting tissue, and potentially the bone surrounding teeth become infected and inflamed.It has also been linked to heart disease and strokes. Gum disease starts with a plaque on the teeth, a sticky white substance that coats teeth. It's formed when bacteria in the mouth mixes with saliva and residues from starchy foods and sugar in your diet. If plaque isn't properly removed from teeth by brushing and flossing, it accumulates and hardens underneath the gum line into tartar. Once tartar builds up, it's much more difficult to remove than a plaque and usually requires professional removal by a dentist. Over time, it can lead to inflamed gums or gingivitis There are two major stages of periodontal disease, gingivitis, and periodontitis. People with diabetes tend to develop gum disease more frequently than others. However, if it is diagnosed in the early stage (gingivitis) , it can be treated and reversed. If you don't get treatment for periodontal disease, it might progress to a more serious and advanced stage (periodontitis), which includes bone loss and is irreversible. Factors That Link Diabetes to Periodontal Disease Studies show that people with insufficient blood sugar control seem to develop gum disease more frequently and more severely than people who have good management over their diabetes. Diabetes slows circulation, which can also make the gum tissues more susceptible to infections. Diabetes reduces the body Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Periodontal Disease

Diabetes And Periodontal Disease

If you have diabetes, you know the disease can harm your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Did you know it can also cause problems in your mouth? People with diabetes have a higher than normal risk of periodontal diseases. Periodontal diseases are infections of the gum and bone that hold the teeth in place. In advanced stages, they lead to painful chewing problems and even tooth loss. Like any infection, gum disease can make it hard to keep your blood sugar under control. Diabetic Control. Like other complications of diabetes, gum disease is linked to diabetic control. People with poor blood sugar control get gum disease more often and more severely, and they lose more teeth than do persons with good control. In fact, people whose diabetes is well controlled have no more periodontal disease than persons without diabetes. Children with IDDM (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) are also at risk for gum problems. Good diabetic control is the best protection against periodontal disease. Studies show that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of some complications of diabetes, such as eye and heart disease and nerve damage. Scientists believe many complications, including gum disease, can be prevented with good diabetic control. Blood Vessel Changes. Thickening of blood vessels is a complication of diabetes that may increase risk for gum disease. Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nourishment to body tissues, including the mouth, and carry away the tissues' waste products. Diabetes causes blood vessels to thicken, which slows the flow of nutrients and the removal of harmful wastes. This can weaken the resistance of gum and bone tissue to infection. Bacteria. Many kinds of bacteria (germs) thrive on sugars, including glucose -- the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Gums

Diabetes And Your Gums

After five years of writing about diabetes, I still think gum care is among the most important and least appreciated aspects of self-management. Studies keep showing how gum (periodontal) disease and diabetes make each other worse. So are you flossing yet? Severe gum disease (periodontitis) can cause diabetes. According to researchers at Marquette University, “Periodontitis may [raise levels of inflammatory cytokines and serum lipids]… These cytokines can produce an insulin resistance syndrome similar to that observed in diabetes and initiate destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to development of diabetes.” Just as gum disease contributes to diabetes, having diabetes worsens gum conditions. According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), “Periodontal disease is often considered the sixth complication of diabetes. Those people who don’t have their diabetes under control are especially at risk.” The link between diabetes and gum disease is that both cause inflammation, not just locally, but through the whole body. Inflammatory cytokines like interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inflame blood vessels, creating small scars. Soon the vessels block up with plaque. These blockage are linked with heart disease, kidney disease, and strokes, all major complications of diabetes. A study from Bangalore, India looked at 200 people, half of whom had recent strokes or heart attacks. Researchers controlled for family history of stroke, diet, smoking and alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, total serum cholesterol level, and education level. Those with worse gums (pocket depths greater than 4.5 millimeters) had far higher risk of strokes. Along with inflammation, infection of the gums creates a vicious diabetes circle. Gum infection Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Prevent Gum Disease If You Have Diabetes

5 Tips To Prevent Gum Disease If You Have Diabetes

Gum disease or gingivitis has been called the fifth complication of diabetes behind heart, nerve, kidney and eye disease. Gingivitis is simply the inflammation of the gums around your teeth caused by plaque buildup. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy So, why are you more at risk for developing gingivitis if you have diabetes? Gum disease begins with bacteria build up on and around your teeth that extends into the gums. There is no difference between the bacteria in the mouth of someone with diabetes compared to someone without diabetes. The reason gum disease is worse if you have diabetes is because you have a greater inflammatory response to this bacteria. If untreated, gum disease can lead to something called periodontitis , or an erosion of the bone, which can lead to loose teeth and damage to the gums. People with uncontrolled diabetes tend to get periodontitis more often than the average person or those who keep their diabetes under control. Some signs that you have gum disease include red, swollen and/or bleeding gums, loose or sensitive teeth and persistent bad breath. If a person with diabetes has moderately advanced periodontal disease, it can be more difficult for them to control their blood sugars. They may need deep cleaning, antibiotics or even oral surgery depending how advanced the gum disease is. In 25 years of diabetes education, we have witnessed on multiple occasions that when people with diabetes see the dentist and address any current issues related to gum disease or inflammation, the blood glucose levels respond almost immediately. Follow these tips to steer clear of gum disease: Avoid acidic drinks like sod Continue reading >>

Teeth, Gums, And Diabetes

Teeth, Gums, And Diabetes

It might seem like diabetes and oral health have little to do with each other, but this is unfortunately not the case. One of the most common effects of diabetes is, in fact, gum disease, and the two conditions can actually make each other harder to deal with. This is why we want to make sure all of our patients have the information they need about the relationship between diabetes and oral health problems. Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects how the body makes and uses insulin, a crucial hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. When the pancreas cant produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or the body cant use it properly (type 2 and gestational diabetes), this leads to hyperglycemia. What does this mean for the teeth and gums? Well, high blood sugar both weakens the immune system and feeds bad oral bacteria, leaving diabetics vulnerable to oral inflammation and decay. By this point, it shouldnt come as a surprise that 22 percent of diabetics suffer from gum disease, ranging from gingivitis (inflammation) to periodontitis (advanced gum disease), which threatens the health of the teeth, gums, and even the underlying bone. Bacteria from gum disease can also endanger overall health if it reaches the bloodstream, making blood sugar even harder to regulate. Some of the symptoms to watch out for include red, swollen, or bleeding gums, gum recession, bad breath, and loosened teeth. Another diabetic symptom that increases the risk of developing gum disease is dry mouth, because saliva is crucial for regulating the mouths pH and washing away bacteria and food particles. While were focusing on gum disease, uncontrolled diabetes can also lead to a variety of other oral health problems , including dry mouth, impaired or slower healing, burning mouth syndrome, salivary gland Continue reading >>

What Is The Link Between Gingivitis And Diabetes?

What Is The Link Between Gingivitis And Diabetes?

What is the link between gingivitis and diabetes? People with diabetes are 2-3 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Children with diabetes have been shown to have more inflammation and gingivitis than children without diabetes. It also appears that people who have a hard time controlling their blood sugar are more likely to have the most severe cases of both gingivitis and periodontal disease. The connection between the two diseases centers on inflammation. Diabetes impairs the healing process and causes the body to produce agents that are responsible for chronic inflammation. It is the chronic inflammatory state that causes gum pocketing, bone and tooth loss. If you or a loved one has diabetes the best thing to do is make sure you have regular dental exams and cleanings. It is also very important to practice good home care every day including cleaning between your teeth. One product that is ideal for people with diabetes is the Water Flosser. It has been tested on people with diabetes and been shown to reduce bleeding by 44% and gingivitis by 42% over traditional methods. While there is no conclusive research showing that severe gum disease causes diabetes, studies indicate that it may be associated with several health conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke. But just because the two conditions are associated does not mean that one causes the other; it only means that some studies have shown that more people with gum disease experience one of the conditions mentioned above than people without gum disease.This finding could be the result of another factor, like smoking. For example, people who smoke are at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and cancer as well as gum disease. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to establish whether Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gingivitis

Diabetes And Gingivitis

Gingivitis is the early stage of gum disease, caused by poor plaque removal from the teeth. It develops when the gums become irritated by the bacteria in the plaque and bleed on tooth cleaning or sometimes when eating. They become swollen and red. Bad breath (halitosis) is also a symptom of gingivitis. Luckily gingivitis is reversible. Through improving your plaque removal techniques and visiting your dentist or hygienist for advice on a home dental health care program, you should be able to reverse this process and have pale pink healthy gums again. A recent adult dental health survey showed that over 50 per cent of people in the UK have gingivitis. Good blood glucose control is important to prevent gingivitis from developing. When our blood sugar levels are high , our saliva will have higher levels of glucose too. This encourages bacteria to grow and increases the risk of our gums becoming damaged. Good plaque removal techniques can help to prevent gingivitis from developing and progressing. Untreated gingivitis can lead on to more serious forms of gum disease such as periodontitis or acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis (see below). Smoking suppresses bleeding in the gums and can mask gingivitis and allow more serious disease to develop. Gingivitis is treated by improving your plaque removal regime: making sure teeth are brushed effectively twice daily and by using small brushes or floss to clean in-between your teeth to remove plaque every day. Your dentist or dental hygienist can give you advice on a home dental health care program, which will include having a healthy lifestyle and stopping bad habits such as smoking. Keeping blood glucose levels under control will also help to prevent gingivitis and stop it from worsening into periodontitis. When you start cle Continue reading >>

Know The Facts About Gum Inflammation And Diabetes At Every Stage

Know The Facts About Gum Inflammation And Diabetes At Every Stage

Know the Facts About Gum Inflammation and Diabetes at Every Stage Ninety percent of good dental care is self care, according to Diabetes Self Management . Much has been written about gum inflammation and diabetes; symptoms of periodontal disease-like gum inflammation can worsen symptoms of the other. But knowing the stages of diabetes where you're most likely to see these partner symptoms, and what preventive steps to take, will help improve the quality of your life with diabetes. Is Periodontal Disease More Common in Type One or Type Two Diabetes? There's no definitive evidence that periodontal disease is more common in one type of diabetes than the another. But in a study posted by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) , both groups with uncontrolled diabetes showed a significant increase in periodontal disease. So, whether you're diagnosed with type one or type two, managing your diabetes, along with excellent oral care, is more important than what type of diabetes you have when it comes to gum disease. At What Stage of Diabetes Should I Be Most Concerned with Gum Disease? Diabetes has five observed stages, according to the ADA , and as your condition progresses, partner symptoms of gum disease, like inflammation or soreness, also progress. Even though gum disease is more probable the higher the stage of diabetes, you should still be concerned if you've been diagnosed with stage one diabetes; gum disease can go undetected at this stage, when early prevention is key. Be sure to commit to good oral care at every stage with products like Colgate Total toothpaste, which helps reduce gingivitis. Chronic inflammation, as is the case in gum disease, can cause several other diseases. Inflammation decreases your body's immune response, particularly if you have an autoimmun Continue reading >>

More in diabetes