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Ginger For Insulin Resistance

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus can be defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin action/secretion and is classified into two major categories, type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for >90% of diabetes and is resulting in impaired function in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Effective control of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients is critical for reducing the risk of micro- and macro-vascular diseases (1). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and has affected 6.4% of adults worldwide in 2010 (2). The global prevalence for all age groups was estimated to be 4.4% in 2030 (3). The number of patients suffering from diabetes, among the 25-64 years old Iranians is 7.7%, equal to 2 million patients, which half of them are not aware of their disease. As well as, 6.8%, equal to 4.4 million of Iranian adults have impaired fasting glucose (4). Dyslipidemia (lipid abnormalities) resulting from uncontrolled hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in diabetic patients is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease (5). Recently, attention has been focused on the relationship between production of free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the pathogenesis as well as progression of diabetes mellitus. Mechanisms that contribute to the formation of free radicals in diabetes mellitus may include metabolic stress resulting from changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory mediators and impaired antioxidant defense mechanisms (5). Hyperglycemia increases oxidative stress through the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which results in an imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant defense system o Continue reading >>

11 Benefits Of Ginger For Diabetes (is Good Or Not ? )

11 Benefits Of Ginger For Diabetes (is Good Or Not ? )

Ginger is a herbal plant which has thick tuberous rhizome and has lots of benefits for human body including the effect to certain disease such as diabetes. Diabetes is one of disease which has been spread world wide and become an epidemic nowadays. People tend to suffer diabetes, most of them are type 2, because unhealthy lifestyle. Ginger is a perennial plant which has stem erect with 60 cm high measured from the rhizome. Ginger plant has elongated leave with 15 – 30 cm long and the rhizome has pungent and aromatic odor and taste. Sponsors Link The case of diabetes melitus prevalence is commonly high and it is rising everyday through worldwide. This increasing number of diabetes is caused by the global increasing number of unhealthy lifestyle and obesity. Study reported that 382 million people in the world suffer from diabetes in 2013 and the number will keep increase until it reaches 592 million numbers in 2035. Most case of diabetes or almost 85% people who suffer diabetes, are made up by the type 2 diabetes and the other 15% attributes to gestational diabetes and type 1 Type 2 diabetes is categorized as metabolic disorder which signed by hyperglycemia condition that caused by insulin resistance and low level of insulin. People with diabetes usually use some drugs to treat hyperglycemia condition such as sulfonylurea, thia-zolidinedione, incretin, and dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 which improve the secretion of insulin and reduce insulin resistance. Chemical drug have significant effect to the body but it also rise some side effect that may harm other organs such as kidney. To minimize the side effect of any chemical drug, nowadays people makes other choice by taking herbal medication. Some herbal plant is believed having numerous health effect and can help to cure diabet Continue reading >>

Ginger For Type 2 Diabetics: This Power Herb Is Scientifically Proven To Increase Insulin Sensitivity

Ginger For Type 2 Diabetics: This Power Herb Is Scientifically Proven To Increase Insulin Sensitivity

Ginger for type 2 diabetics: This power herb is scientifically proven to increase insulin sensitivity Tuesday, April 16, 2013 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer (NaturalNews) Ginger may help increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to the findings of a recent study conducted by researchers from the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in Iran and published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body fails to respond appropriately to the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin. In contrast, type 1 diabetes is characterized by the body's failing to produce sufficient insulin to regulate blood sugar. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 64 people with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to take either a placebo or 2 g of ginger each day for two months. The researchers found that at the end of the study, patients who had received ginger had significantly higher insulin sensitivity and significantly lower levels of insulin, LDL ("bad") cholesterol and triglycerides. The findings suggest that ginger might be helpful to reduce "secondary complications" of type 2 diabetes, the researchers concluded. The findings follow another recent study, published by researchers from the University of Sydney in 2012, which found that ginger extract helps increase cells' absorption of glucose even independent of insulin. "This assists in the management of high levels of blood sugar that create complications for long-term diabetic patients, and may allow cells to operate independently of insulin," lead author Basil Roufogalis said. The researchers found that the chemicals responsible for this property of ginger are the phenols known as gingerols. Specifically, gingerols increased the Continue reading >>

Ginger May Lower Blood Glucose In Diabetics

Ginger May Lower Blood Glucose In Diabetics

Ginger May Lower Blood Glucose in Diabetics Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is spreading at an alarming rate,where approximately one person in the UK is newly diagnosed with diabetes everytwo minutes (1). In most cases, T2D can be managed by undertaking dietary andlifestyle changes. Along with modifying lifestyle habits, supplementing the diet with therapeutic herbs may help manage blood glucose levels in diabetics, as suggested by compelling scientific evidence (2). In particular, ginger supplementation has been found to improve fasting blood glucose levels and insulin sensitivity in T2D (3). After analysing results from 10 different studies involving 490 participants, Zhu et al. encouraged the use of ginger to help manage T2D (3). The included studies randomly assigned participants to take a ginger capsule or a placebo. The dose of ginger ranged from 1-3g/day, and the intervention trials ranged from 1-3 months in duration. After ginger supplementation, a decrease in HbA1c (glycosylated haemoglobin), fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (insulin resistance index) was observed, thus supporting the proposed benefits of ginger. In addition, ginger supplementation improved blood lipid profiles of participants, which may reduce cardiovascular disease risk. It is proposed that the gingerol and shogaol, the main active ingredients of ginger, contribute to the detected glucose-lowering effects. Moreover, 6-gingerol is believed to stimulate glucose metabolism, and may protect pancreatic ??-cells, that are responsible for insulin production (4). Although the current evidence is promising, long-term trials are required to assess the efficacy of ginger on disease prevention and T2D reversal. In conclusion, daily ginger supplementation by 1g may be safely incorporated into a diabetics lifestyle, to Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Ginger Powder Supplementation On Insulin Resistance And Glycemic Indices In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

The Effect Of Ginger Powder Supplementation On Insulin Resistance And Glycemic Indices In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

Complement Ther Med. 2014 Feb;22(1):9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2013.12.017. Epub 2014 Jan 8. OBJECTIVE: To identify the effect of some herbal products on insulin resistance. Regarding the scientific evidences existing about ginger, this research was therefore carried out to identify the effect of ginger supplementation on insulin resistance and glycemic indices in diabetes mellitus. METHODS: This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which 88 participants affected by diabetes were randomly assigned into ginger (GG) and placebo (PG) groups. The GG received 3 one-gram capsules containing ginger powder whereas the PG received 3 one-gram microcrystalline-containing capsules daily for 8 weeks. HbA1c, fructosamine, fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), -cell function (%), insulin sensitivity (S%) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were assessed before and after the intervention. RESULTS: FBS mean showed a decrease of 10.5% (p=0.003) in the GG whereas the mean had an increase of 21% in the PG (p=0.01). Variation in HbA1c mean was in line with that of FBS. Statistical difference was found in the two groups before and after the intervention in terms of median of fasting insulin level, S% and HOMA-IR (P<0.005). Moreover QUICKI mean increased significantly in the two groups, the mean difference, however, was significantly higher in the GG. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated that daily consumption of 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder for 8 weeks is useful for patients with type 2 diabetes due to FBS and HbA1c reduction and improvement of insulin resistance indices such as QUICKI index. Copyright 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Shidfar F, et al. J Comple Continue reading >>

A Modest Dose Of Ginger Improves 8 Markers Of Diabetes Type 2

A Modest Dose Of Ginger Improves 8 Markers Of Diabetes Type 2

A promising new study published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition reveals that the popular kitchen spice ginger may be an effective treatment for the prevention of diabetes and its complications. Ginger is in the same plant family (Zingiberacea) that includes the medicinal powerhouse turmeric, and which only recently was proven to be 100% effective in preventing the development of type 2 diabetes in prediabetics, according to a study published in the American Diabetes Association's own journal Diabetes Care. In the new ginger study, titled "The effect of ginger consumption of glycemic status, lipid profile and some inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus,"[i] 70 type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial, the objective of which was to assess the effect of ginger consumption on glycemic status, lipid profile and some common inflammatory markers associated with the condition. The trial participants were divided randomly into a ginger group and control group, receiving either 1600 mg ginger or a 1600 mg placebo daily for 12 weeks. The patients were measured before and after the intervention for blood sugar levels, blood lipids, C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). As a result of the intervention, ginger treatment reduced the following parameters significantly compared with the placebo group: Fasting plasma glucose HbA1C (aka glycated hemoglobin) - a measurement of how much damage is being caused by sugars to red blood cells in the body, reflective of body wide damage caused by chronically elevated blood sugar Insulin HOMA (the homeostatic model assessment) – which measures insulin resistance and beta-cell function (the pancreatic ce Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Breaking news! Some newly discovered compounds have just been found to turn off all of the genes that cause diabetes. Are these compounds found in a pill bottle? No! Instead, you’ll find them on your dinner plate — in rye bread and pasta. (As I recently wrote in one of my blogs, rye contains special phytonutrients that turn off all the genes responsible for diabetes — in just a few weeks.) Last week, I explained how to find out if you are pre-diabetic or diabetic. Half of the 24 million people with diabetes don’t know they have it and nearly all the 60 million people with pre-diabetes don’t know they have it. Today, I want to share with you more information about what you can do NOW to prevent and reverse diabetes and pre-diabetes. And rye bread isn’t the only answer — I’ve got a lot more good advice, too. But first I want to emphasize new research that should be headlines news but never saw the light of day. Do our current drugs treatments for diabetes actually work to prevent heart attacks and death? Surely lowering blood sugar in diabetics is an effective strategy for reducing the risk of death and heart disease. It would seem obvious that if diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar, then reducing blood sugar would be beneficial. However elevated sugar is only a symptom, not the cause of the problem. The real problem is elevated insulin unchecked over decades from a highly refined carbohydrate diet, a sedentary lifestyle and environmental toxins. Most medications and insulin therapy are aimed at lowering blood sugar through increasing insulin. In the randomized ACCORD trial of over 10,000 patients, this turns out to be a bad idea. In the intensive glucose-lowering group, there were no fewer heart attacks, and more patients died. Yet we continue to pa Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that some people are born with and others may develop over time. It affects the way people produce or respond to insulin, which in turn affects the way your body processes sugar. Because of this, it’s important to take note of what you’re eating and how it may impact your blood sugar levels. Ginger, for example, is low in carbohydrates and calories. It has only 1.3 grams of carbohydrates per teaspoon. Known for its spicy taste and unmistakable flavor, ginger also contains potassium, iron, and fiber. Over the years, ginger has been shown to help reduce blood sugar levels and help regulate insulin response in people with diabetes. In one 2014 animal study, obese rats with diabetes were given a mix of cinnamon and ginger. These rats experienced a wealth of benefits, including: reduced body weight reduced body fat mass decreased blood sugar levels increased insulin levels According to researchers in a 2015 study, ginger powder supplements may help improve fasting blood sugar. Participants in this study were given 2 grams of ginger every day for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, researchers found that people in this group also experienced lower levels of: hemoglobin A1c apolipoprotein B apolipoprotein A-1 malondialdehyde Researchers in a 2016 study on rats with diabetes found that ginger might help protect against heart problems that occur due to diabetes. Ginger’s anti-inflammatory properties may also help prevent certain diabetes complications. Although many studies suggest that ginger could be useful in diabetes management, you should take precautions when consuming it. You shouldn’t consume more than 4 grams of ginger per day. Although side effects are rare, it’s possible to experience heartburn, diarrhea, and upset stomach if Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Research indicates that you don't need drugs to control blood sugar. Food, herbs, and spices are the future of medicine. Over 80 million Americans have insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes. And you could be on the road to diabetes for 10 years or more and never even know it. Here's what happens. The hormone insulin directs your cells to open up and take in glucose from the blood. With insulin resistance, your cells become desensitized to insulin. They ignore the instructions to open up and take in glucose. Your body keeps producing more insulin to try to get the message heard. But it doesn't work. And your insulin levels rise higher and higher. Those chronically high insulin levels cause rapid weight gain, premature aging, high blood pressure, heart disease, and higher cancer risks. Eventually they lead to type 2 diabetes. Herbs, spices and foods are your first line of defense. Here are eight that can help restore and maintain your cells' sensitivity to insulin. 1. Turmeric: 100% Effective In Preventing Diabetes A 2009 study found curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, was 500 to 100,000 times more effective than the prescription drug Metformin at activating glucose uptake.[i] In another study of 240 pre-diabetic adults, patients were given either 250 milligrams of curcumin or a placebo every day. After nine months, NONE of those taking curcumin developed diabetes but 16.4% of the placebo group did. In other words, the curcumin was 100% effective at preventing Type 2 diabetes. 2. Ginger: Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose by 10.5% In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 88 diabetics were divided into two groups. Every day one group received a placebo while the other received 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder. After eight weeks, the ginger g Continue reading >>

Ginger For Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Ginger For Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Ginger sitting among vegetables and lemons.Photo Credit: villagemoon/iStock/Getty Images Keren Price began medical writing in 1997. Over the years, she has written for a wide range of clients, including Medtronic, Salix Pharmaceuticals, and General Mills. Prior to her medical writing career, Price was the managing editor of the Journal of Nutrition Education. She earned a Bachelor of Science in biopsychology from Tufts University and a Master's degree in nutrition from Penn State. Ginger, or Zingiber officinale, has been been used for centuries as a traditional remedy for a variety of illnesses, including diabetes. Use of herbal and nutritional remedies is increasing in the United States, and many people with diabetes are looking toward these natural products to help manage their condition. A number of researchers have investigated ginger's effect on type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as well as its potential to protect against diabetes-related complications. While additional research is needed, some preliminary evidence indicates ginger might have some benefits for people with diabetes. However, ginger is not a replacement for medical therapy. Effects on Blood Sugar and Insulin Sensitivity An April 2015 review article in "Current Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression" describes a number of animal and human studies examining the effects of ginger on diabetes. Several studies involving rats with experimentally induced diabetes showed that ginger juice or ginger extract had blood-sugar-lowering effects. The review also summarized the results of 3 small studies investigating the effect of ginger supplements on people with T2DM, in dosages ranging from 1.6 to 3.0 g daily for periods ranging from 8 to 12 weeks. All studies found improvements in blood sugar and insulin sensitivity. A Ma Continue reading >>

Ginger: A Herb Scientifically Proven To Increase Insulin Sensitivity In Type 2 Diabetes

Ginger: A Herb Scientifically Proven To Increase Insulin Sensitivity In Type 2 Diabetes

Ginger (Zingiber officinale), a kitchen spice used worldwide may be an effective treatment for the prevention of diabetes and its complications. Although in western countries ginger is mostly used as a cooking spice, it has been used as a medicine in Chinese, Indian, and Arabic herbal traditions since ancient times to help in digestion and as an anti-inflammatory helping to treat arthritis and the common cold. that this popular kitchen spicemay be an effective treatment for the prevention of diabetes and its complications that ginger supplementation improved insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes patients Although body produces insulin in Type 2 diabetes, unlike in Type 1 diabetes where little to no insulin is produced, cells are unable to use insulin to transport glucose (sugar) out of the blood and into the cells where it is used for energy. Excessive glucose that continues to circulate in the bloodstream can cause complications such as blindness and kidney disease in diabetic patients. Ginger has many vital active compounds including gingerones, gingerols, paradols and shogaols. Among them [6]- and [8]-gingerols were most effective in increasing the uptake of glucose by the cells. Researchers explain that these gingerols increase distribution of a protein called GLUT4. When GLUT4 appears on the surface of the skeletal muscle cells (the major site of glucose clearance in the body), it enhances glucose uptake. Type 2 diabetics have insufficient GLUT4 for this process to occur. Therefore it can be hoped that gingerols can be used to manage blood glucose levels in Type 2 diabetic patients. Now scientists are expecting to examine further the effects of ginger in blood glucose management in human clinical trials. In the meantime, adding ginger to diet can prove to be bene Continue reading >>

Ginger Increases Insulin Sensitivity In Type-2 Diabetics

Ginger Increases Insulin Sensitivity In Type-2 Diabetics

Ginger contains numerous therapeutic substances that can improve health in people suffering from type-2 diabetes [Image: Flickr/artizone] Ginger increases insulin sensitivity in type-2 diabetics Natural Health News New research has shows that in patients with type-2 diabetes, ginger may help increase insulin sensitivity. Iranian scientists working out of the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences conducted a two month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 64 people with type-2 diabetes. During this time the study subjects were randomly given either a placebo or 2 g of ginger each day. In type-2 diabetes, which usually develops later in life due to a combination of unhealthy lifestyle factors, the body does not respond efficiency to the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin. This is different from type-1, or insulin dependant diabetes, which develops earlier in life and is characterised by the bodys failing to produce sufficient insulin to regulate blood sugar. At the end of this study, those who had received ginger had significantly higher insulin sensitivity and significantly lower levels of insulin, as well as lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglycerides. According to the study published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition the findings suggest that ginger might be helpful to reduce secondary complications of type 2 diabetes, the researchers concluded. Other researchers have come to similar conclusions. In 2012 Australian researchers found that extracts from Buderim ginger a variety native to Australia could increase uptake of glucose by the cells without the need of insulin . Native to Africa, India, China, Australia and Jamaica, it is commonly used as a spice or flavouring agent in cooking,as well as a remedy for various ailm Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Ginger For Treating Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Randomized Clinical Trials - Sciencedirect

Efficacy Of Ginger For Treating Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Randomized Clinical Trials - Sciencedirect

Volume 2, Issue 1 , March 2015, Pages 36-43 Efficacy of ginger for treating Type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials Author links open overlay panel James W.Dailya MiniYangb Da SolKimb SunminParkb Open Access funded by Korea Food Research Institute Few clinical trials have investigated the antidiabetic effects of ginger to date. Several recent clinical trials published in 2013 and 2014, although small, have added contradictory but compelling new evidence about the use of ginger in treating diabetes in humans. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to clarify the evidence for using ginger to treat diabetes. Five randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were identified and included in the meta-analysis. Four of the RCTs were considered high quality and lasted 8 weeks; one lasted only 30 days and was considered low quality. Outcomes measured included fasting blood glucose and insulin, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)-insulin resistance (IR), and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and were assessed as mean differences in the meta-analysis. Ginger supplementation significantly lowered fasting blood glucose concentrations and HbA1c levels, but did not significantly lower fasting blood insulin or HOMA-IR. Ginger root supplementation significantly lowers blood glucose and HbA1c levels. When combined with dietary and lifestyle interventions it may be an effective intervention for managing Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Continue reading >>

Ginger For Diabetes: Is It Really Safe And Good?

Ginger For Diabetes: Is It Really Safe And Good?

Ginger is a spice obtained from rhizomes (underground parts of the stem) of Zingiber officinale plant. Due to its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, people in India and China have been using it as a natural remedy for many diseases, including nausea, morning sickness, motion sickness, Alzheimer's disease, flu, and cold for over 3,000 years ( 1 , 2 ). Besides, it also reduces cholesterol, helps in weight loss and stimulates blood circulation ( 3 , 4 , 5 ) Allegedly, it may also slow down the growth of tumor (cancer) cells. Ginger contains some bioactive plant substances, the most important of which is gingerol. This molecule is responsible for most anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antidiabetic effects of ginger. There are many ways to eat ginger. You may use it as a spice or food ingredient, make some ginger tea or buy some ginger powder, oil or juice in your local pharmacy or specialized stores. Cosmetic manufacturers also add ginger to beauty products. Many people think that the edible part of ginger is its root, but it is not true. The piece of the Zingiber officinale plant used in medicine is called rhizome, which is an underground section of the stem. The summary: Ginger rhizomes contain gingerol, which is a potent phytochemical with strong antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic properties. You can consume ginger in various ways, including ginger tea, powder, juice or spice. New research suggests that ginger may have strong antidiabetic effects. Ginger has a positive impact not only on diabetes itself, but it may also help in the treatment of complications associated with diabetes. Effects of ginger on diabetes and blood sugar levels In 2015, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted involving 41 participants with type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Can Ginger Help Treat Or Cure Type 2 Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Can Ginger Help Treat Or Cure Type 2 Diabetes? | Everyday Health

RELATED: The Best and Worst Foods to Eat if You Have Type 2 Diabetes Potential Health Benefits of Ginger for Type 2 Diabetes Ginger is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substance that has many potential health benefits for certain conditions, including certain types of cancer, suggests a study published in April 2013 in the International Journal of Preventive Medicine . The possible perks of this herb dont end there. We know that ginger is commonly used to help relieve nausea, vomiting, or any upset stomach, and there is also some evidence it may reduce menstrual pain symptoms , morning sickness in pregnant women, and even arthritis pain in joints, says Rahaf Al Bochi, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and owner of Olive Tree Nutrition . RELATED: The 7 Best Foods for a Healthy Immune System When it comes to type 2 diabetes, Al Bochi says the value of ginger remains unclear due to limited research. But results produced thus far may suggest promise for including the herb in your diabetes treatment plan. Al Boshi references a review published in March 2015 in the Journal of Ethnic Foods that suggested taking ginger supplements may help reduce A1C levels and fasting serum glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. A1C is a common diabetes test that measures your average blood sugar level over a two- to three-month period. Sounds great, right? Not so fast: Al Bochi notes the review wasnt without flaw. All of the sample groups were really small, they were done over a few weeks of time, and they were all homogenous based out of one or two countries. Due to those factors, the studies the researchers analyzed didnt provide enough information for health experts to conclusively recommend ginger as an effective treatment for type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

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