diabetestalk.net

Ginger And A1c

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, a total of 41 type 2 diabetic patients randomly were assigned to ginger or placebo groups (22 in ginger group and 19 in control group), received 2 g/day of ginger powder supplement or lactose as placebo for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde were analyzed before and after the intervention. Ginger supplementation significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in ginger group in comparison to baseline, as well as control group, while it increased the level of apolipoprotein A-I (p<0.05). It seems that oral administration of ginger powder supplement can improves fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. So it may have a role in alleviating the risk of some chronic complications of diabetes. Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

The Effects of Ginger on Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-I and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients @inproceedings{Khandouzi2015TheEO, title={The Effects of Ginger on Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-I and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients}, author={Nafiseh Khandouzi and Farzad Shidfar and Asadollah Rajab and Tayebeh Rahideh and Payam Hosseini and Mohsen Mir Taheri}, booktitle={Iranian journal of pharmaceutical research : IJPR}, year={2015}} Nafiseh Khandouzi , Farzad Shidfar , +3 authors Mohsen Mir Taheri Published 2015 in Iranian journal of pharmaceutical research : IJPR Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trialCONTINUE READING This paper has 28 citations. REVIEW CITATIONS Averaging 14 citations per year over the last 2 years. Learn more about how we calculate this metric in our FAQ . Walter Verengai, Lameck Chagonda, Kudakwashe Chitindingu , Amos Marume , Tafadzwa Taderera International journal of molecular sciences Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Medical journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran International journal of endocrinology and Bisrat Hailemeskel , Enaefe Ziregbe, +4 authors Anteneh Habte Hypoglycemic Effects of Three Medicinal Plants in Experimental Diabetes : Inhibition of Rat Intestinal glucosidase an Continue reading >>

Lower Your Blood Sugar With These Herbs And Spices

Lower Your Blood Sugar With These Herbs And Spices

With all of the nutrition information available today about improving blood sugar, it can be a bit daunting to know which information is correct and which is not. It is soimportant to look to what science-based evidence and research says about the subject. But even more, we needthis science to be translated into easy to understand adviceso that we can actually incorporate it into our lives and benefit from it. This is the most important factor. If you are someone who has struggled with the roller coaster of blood sugar management, I have some good news! Research shows that there are common herbs and spices, likely ones that you already have in your kitchen, that have some potential positive effects on improving blood sugar. Today, Im breaking down some of the superstar herbs and spices that datahas indicated may help with blood sugar management. Oregano and Sage:One group of researchers tested a variety of herbs and spices for a specific antioxidant activity that help to prevent an increase in hemoglobin A1C, a protein maker in the blood that is affected by blood sugar levels. They found that two of the herbs with the highest antioxidant levels were oregano and sage (1)can you say Italian food? Use these herbs in their fresh or dried form to add flavor to everything from chicken and fish to soup and roasted veggies. Since oregano and sage are both considered Italian herbs, I love adding them to marinara or ground turkey if Im making some to go along with spaghetti squash. This Pumpkin Spice Pork Tenderloin recipe is also a favorite and another great way to incorporate sage. Garlic: Potent, but effective. Garlic is known as one of the oldest medicines in the worldand with good reason. An animal study that administered high doses of raw garlic to rats for 4 weeks found t Continue reading >>

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

We live in a world where prescription medicine is getting more and more expensive as well as controversial. Alternative medicine is gaining momentum and with good reason! The same is true for treatments for diabetes type 2. You have therapies that can reverse diabetes through lifestyle and diet changes, natural supplements that can help stabilize blood sugar levels, and also herbs that lower blood sugar. Not only are these alternative therapies safer, but they are also easier on your pocket, on your body and mind. Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is necessary for the body’s overall health. Erratic blood sugar levels can affect the body’s ability to function normally and even lead to complications if left unchecked. Some herbs and spices found in nature do a tremendous job of naturally lowering blood sugar levels, making them a boon for diabetics and pre-diabetics. What’s more, being nature’s multi-taskers, herbs and spices also produce overall health benefits beyond just helping balance blood sugar. We want to clarify one thing right away – not everything on our list can be classified as ‘herbs’. However, they are all from natural sources. Herbs come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Spices are parts of the plant other than the leafy bit, such as the root, stem, bulb, bark or seeds. RELATED: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the best herbs that lower blood sugar, along with a few spices thrown in, to give you a more comprehensive list. Please note that while we normally do not use animal studies to support any dietary supplement, several herbs like garlic and ginger are considered ‘food’ and so, are used traditionally by cultures across the world in their daily diet Continue reading >>

1 Gram Ginger Capsules Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar And Hba1c In Diabetes Patients

1 Gram Ginger Capsules Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar And Hba1c In Diabetes Patients

1 gram ginger capsules reduce fasting blood sugar and HbA1c in diabetes patients Implantable gel could help tackle diabetes Taking a 1 gram capsule of ground ginger 3 times daily for a period of 8 weeks resulted in decreased fasting blood sugar levels and improved HbA1c levels in people with type 2 diabetes. The research was carried out by the Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd, Iran. 88 participants with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to take either ground ginger capsules or a placebo pill. The results showed that the ginger taking participants' fasting blood glucose levels decreased by 10.5%, this is significant as the participants taking the placebo experienced an increase in fasting blood glucose levels by 21%. The improvement in fasting blood glucose levels also contributed to a decrease in HbA1c levels . In addition, measurements of insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity were significantly better in group which benefitted from the ginger capsule. Patients with type 2 diabetes will likely take interest in the study, particularly as ground ginger is neither difficult to get hold of, nor particularly expensive. However, it's important to note that the trial was only run over 8 weeks and long term side effects were not investigated. If you are considering taking ginger on a daily basis, it is advisable to check with your GP before going ahead. Continue reading >>

The Role Of Ginger In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The Role Of Ginger In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The Role of Ginger in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Family Medicine, Charlotte, NC Dr. Haas reports no financial relationships relevant to this field of study. SYNOPSIS: Ginger supplementation exhibits a promising effect on glycemic control, triglyceride levels, and systemic inflammation in type 2 diabetics. SOURCE: Arablou T, et al. The effect of ginger consumption on glycemic status, lipid profile, and some inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Int J Food Sci Nutr 2014;65:515-520. Taking 1600 mg of ginger root daily for 12 weeks improves several markers of glucose control (fasting blood, sugar, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin levels). Patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes who ingested ginger root had significant reductions in the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein after 12 weeks. Traditionally, the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus involves achieving enhanced glucose control as a result of increasing insulin resistance. However, mounting evidence suggests that insulin resistance, and its associated defects in glucose and lipid metabolism, is just one of the many consequences of chronic, low-grade systemic inflammation.1 As a result, reducing levels of chronic systemic inflammation has become a growing interest among researchers, especially as it relates to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Botanicals with strong anti-inflammatory properties routinely generate attention for a possible role in the management of diabetes mellitus. Ginger (Zingiber officinale), a spice used in Chinese and Ayurvedic traditions to treat diseases ranging from gingivitis to asthma,2 contains many antioxidant compounds believed to exert strong anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of cyclooxygenase, i Continue reading >>

Can Ginger Help Treat Or Cure Type 2 Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Can Ginger Help Treat Or Cure Type 2 Diabetes? | Everyday Health

RELATED: The Best and Worst Foods to Eat if You Have Type 2 Diabetes Potential Health Benefits of Ginger for Type 2 Diabetes Ginger is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substance that has many potential health benefits for certain conditions, including certain types of cancer, suggests a study published in April 2013 in the International Journal of Preventive Medicine . The possible perks of this herb dont end there. We know that ginger is commonly used to help relieve nausea, vomiting, or any upset stomach, and there is also some evidence it may reduce menstrual pain symptoms , morning sickness in pregnant women, and even arthritis pain in joints, says Rahaf Al Bochi, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and owner of Olive Tree Nutrition . RELATED: The 7 Best Foods for a Healthy Immune System When it comes to type 2 diabetes, Al Bochi says the value of ginger remains unclear due to limited research. But results produced thus far may suggest promise for including the herb in your diabetes treatment plan. Al Boshi references a review published in March 2015 in the Journal of Ethnic Foods that suggested taking ginger supplements may help reduce A1C levels and fasting serum glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. A1C is a common diabetes test that measures your average blood sugar level over a two- to three-month period. Sounds great, right? Not so fast: Al Bochi notes the review wasnt without flaw. All of the sample groups were really small, they were done over a few weeks of time, and they were all homogenous based out of one or two countries. Due to those factors, the studies the researchers analyzed didnt provide enough information for health experts to conclusively recommend ginger as an effective treatment for type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

 Ginger: A Secret Weapon For Blood Sugar Control

Ginger: A Secret Weapon For Blood Sugar Control

Ginger: A Secret Weapon for Blood Sugar Control Ginger: A Secret Weapon for Blood Sugar Control From a scientific perspective, there is no doubt that maintaining appropriate blood sugar levels is important for optimal health, but I am of the opinion that moderate amounts of sugar can be included in a healthful diet, when consumed responsibly. Years of working one-on-one with clients has illustrated that including some sugar in the diet, ideally from natural sources, combined with other nutrients and exercise, can help people avoid the psychological consequences of restrictive diets and may prevent overindulgence in moments of reduced motivation. Further, candies such as The Ginger People Gin-Gins help people suffering from severe nausea, which may allow them to eat a substantial and nutritious meal. However, type 2 diabetes has become an incredibly pervasive endocrine disorder, and due to impaired carbohydrate metabolism in this population, control of blood sugar levels is particularly important. Proper management of blood sugar levels, especially for people with metabolic diseases, are elusive ideals. With tempting carbohydrate-laden goodies always at our fingertips, stressful on-the-go lifestyles, and decades of eating habits that may be hard to break, how can we reasonably impact disease management or risk? Luckily, ginger may offer a solution. Because pharmaceutical companies are the major funders of medical research, it is unusual to come across quality literature regarding the effect of particular foods or nutrients on health. Though interestingly, there are a few studies that have examined ginger intake in people with type 2 diabetes. Notably, a 2015 study conducted the gold standard for medical research: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical t Continue reading >>

Ginger Shown To Lower Blood Sugar

Ginger Shown To Lower Blood Sugar

Ginger, the spice that puts a kick in your favorite foods, has been a go-to medicine for eons, being used to treat ailments such as colds, motion sickness, and arthritis pain. Now, it looks like the spice can lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study by researchers from Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd, Iran. The research team studied 88 people with type 2 diabetes. The volunteers, all of whom had been living with diabetes for at least 10 years, were randomly given either 3 daily one-gram capsules of ginger powder or 3 identical-looking sham capsules, in addition to their regular diabetes meds. Those who took the ginger capsules saw a significant decrease in blood sugar after 8 weeks. Study participants were middle-aged and overweight, but not obese. "It's interesting that the ginger group happened to be in worse shape, diabetes-wise, at the beginning of the study, than the placebo group," says Martha Howard, MD, medical director of Wellness Associates of Chicago. "I was impressed that their fasting blood sugars started at 171 and 136, respectively, and then both groups ended up with similar FBS numbers in the mid-150s," said Howard.According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting blood sugar levels for people with diabetes should range between 70 and 130 mg/dl. Researchers aren't exactly sure how ginger works to lower blood sugar. It's possible that it inhibits hepatic phosphorylasean enzyme that breaks down glucose storage molecules, called glycogen, says Howard. When glycogen breaks down, blood sugar risesso inhibiting this enzyme could theoretically lower blood sugar for people with type 2 diabetes, she explains. Howard says that if you have type 2 diabetes and your blood sugar still isn't where you want Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that some people are born with and others may develop over time. It affects the way people produce or respond to insulin, which in turn affects the way your body processes sugar. Because of this, it’s important to take note of what you’re eating and how it may impact your blood sugar levels. Ginger, for example, is low in carbohydrates and calories. It has only 1.3 grams of carbohydrates per teaspoon. Known for its spicy taste and unmistakable flavor, ginger also contains potassium, iron, and fiber. Over the years, ginger has been shown to help reduce blood sugar levels and help regulate insulin response in people with diabetes. In one 2014 animal study, obese rats with diabetes were given a mix of cinnamon and ginger. These rats experienced a wealth of benefits, including: reduced body weight reduced body fat mass decreased blood sugar levels increased insulin levels According to researchers in a 2015 study, ginger powder supplements may help improve fasting blood sugar. Participants in this study were given 2 grams of ginger every day for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, researchers found that people in this group also experienced lower levels of: hemoglobin A1c apolipoprotein B apolipoprotein A-1 malondialdehyde Researchers in a 2016 study on rats with diabetes found that ginger might help protect against heart problems that occur due to diabetes. Ginger’s anti-inflammatory properties may also help prevent certain diabetes complications. Although many studies suggest that ginger could be useful in diabetes management, you should take precautions when consuming it. You shouldn’t consume more than 4 grams of ginger per day. Although side effects are rare, it’s possible to experience heartburn, diarrhea, and upset stomach if Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus can be defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin action/secretion and is classified into two major categories, type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for >90% of diabetes and is resulting in impaired function in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Effective control of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients is critical for reducing the risk of micro- and macro-vascular diseases (1). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and has affected 6.4% of adults worldwide in 2010 (2). The global prevalence for all age groups was estimated to be 4.4% in 2030 (3). The number of patients suffering from diabetes, among the 25-64 years old Iranians is 7.7%, equal to 2 million patients, which half of them are not aware of their disease. As well as, 6.8%, equal to 4.4 million of Iranian adults have impaired fasting glucose (4). Dyslipidemia (lipid abnormalities) resulting from uncontrolled hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in diabetic patients is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease (5). Recently, attention has been focused on the relationship between production of free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the pathogenesis as well as progression of diabetes mellitus. Mechanisms that contribute to the formation of free radicals in diabetes mellitus may include metabolic stress resulting from changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory mediators and impaired antioxidant defense mechanisms (5). Hyperglycemia increases oxidative stress through the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which results in an imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant defense system o Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Lowering Your A1c

5 Tips For Lowering Your A1c

If you have diabetes, the idea of lowering your A1C to a number less than 7.0 may seem impossible without acquiring some sort of diabetes management obsession. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (and Celiac disease) when I was a teenager, I'm here to tell you, it doesn't. While I certainly don’t want to give the impression that it’s a simple or easy goal to obtain, I've been able to maintain an A1C of 6.0 for most of my adult life mostly by following a proven path of tried and true strategies. By far the most helpful thing for me has been to structure my nutrition so I'm eating fairly low-carb throughout the day and "save" my carb servings for dinner or dessert. This way, managing my blood sugars in a tighter range requires significantly less effort than when I do eat my carbs in the evening. Here, a few other rules I live by: 1. Care about the quality of food you eat. This simple principle is terribly important. Consuming a diet that is made mostly of real food—whole food—that you chopped and prepared and cooked yourself will have the greatest impact on your blood sugars and your sensitivity to insulin, whether you’re type 1, type 2 or have prediabetes. You don’t have to be a brilliant chef to cook delicious food in reasonable amounts of time on a reasonable budget—but you do have to be willing! Dive in, learn, take your time—enjoy it! Your blood sugars will thank you for the effort. Start by taking a closer look at how much of your current food choices are highly processed! 2. Find an activity you enjoy and become more active in it. You don’t have to be an athlete or a hardcore Cross-fitter to benefit from exercise. Just walking 30 minutes a day will have a powerful effect on your overall sensitivity to insulin and your blood sugar levels. I used to be a Continue reading >>

Ginger And Diabetes: A Mini-review.

Ginger And Diabetes: A Mini-review.

Mini Review - Archives of General Internal Medicine (2018) Volume 2, Issue 2 Achima Care Ekeby vrdcentral, Storgatan 46, 26776, Ekeby, Sweden Citation: Lindstedt I. Ginger and diabetes: A mini-review. Arch Gen Intern Med. 2018;2(2):29-33. Visit for more related articles at Archives of General Internal Medicine Background: Ginger is one of the most well liked spices in the world. In more recent times interest has shifted towards possible effects of ginger on cancer, blood clotting, inflammation and pain. However, lesser attention has been given to metabolic diseases such as diabetes. Animal studies and human trials have shown promising results. Methods: A comprehensive search was made in PubMed ( ) and The University of Linkpings electronic research database ( www.bibl.liu.se.e.bibl.liu.se/?l=sv ). The goal was to gather information about human research on the topic ginger and diabetes mellitus in randomized and/or controlled clinical trials or meta-analyses in order to review the scientific evidence. The following search terms were used in various combinations: Diabetes; Glucose; Insulin; Cardiovascular; Ginger; Zingiber Officinale; Meta-analysis; Randomized; Controlled; Clinical Trial. Results: The PubMed search yielded several randomized and/or controlled clinical trials on the topic of the effects of ginger on diabetes mellitus or diabetes-related measurements such as glucose or insulin or lipids. The search also yielded four meta-analyses. The individual clinical trials found had already been included in the four meta-analyses, except for one trial that was published after the last inclusion date in the most recent meta-analysis. The meta-analyses all showed that ginger consumption could have profitable effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in patients with diabe Continue reading >>

Gingers Benefits For Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetescare.net

Gingers Benefits For Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetescare.net

Spices and herbs add great flavors and zing to our food while contributing very few calories and fat. Most (unless salt is added) are very low in sodium. They make the food we eat tasty and very enjoyable. Readers ask often if there are any spices that could lower blood glucose. This blog will explore the differences between spices and herbs. We will focus on the spice ginger and the research that has been done on the effects it has on blood glucose. The Difference Between a Spice and an Herb Lets first go to basic definitions. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a spice is an edible flavoring that usually comes from the fruit of a plant. Exceptions to this include cinnamon (comes from the bark of a plant) and ginger (comes from the rhizome or bulb) of a plant. When used for consumption and seasoning foods, herbs comes from the leaves of plants that do not have woody perennial stems like a tree or shrub. (1) As you can see, ginger is a spice. It is common throughout the world. (2) The scientific name or botanical name for ginger is Zingiber officinale Roscoe. (3) Countries such as India, China, Nepal, Nigeria, Brazil, Costa Rica and Fiji produce much of our ginger. Hawaiian ginger is known for its excellent flavor. (4) Here are some tipson how to select and store ginger for home use. Ginger is used medicinally for helping with nausea and vomiting, gastrointestinal ailments and certain types of headaches. (3, 4) Ginger has also been studied for its effects on diabetes. (2) In a small study of 50 patients age 20-60 years with type 2 non-insulin dependent diabetes who did not take antioxidant or botanical supplements, drink alcohol or smoke, and did not have a change in medication, diet or exercise levels for at least 3 months were given a supplement Continue reading >>

5 Things That Helped Me Improve My A1c

5 Things That Helped Me Improve My A1c

This article is intended for people with diabetes who take insulin and monitor their blood sugars frequently with blood glucose tests and/or with continuous glucose monitors. (NOTE: If you’re struggling mentally with the pressure of improving your A1C results, read this article from a physician who realized just how emotional A1C measurements can be for her patients: Ending the A1C Blame Game.) Your A1c is a simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. You can read more about A1Cs here. When I was a college student through to my early 20s, my A1C hovered between 6.8 to 7.3, but as I’ve gotten older and become and more and more engrossed in health, nutrition, planning for optimal pregnancy, and overall commitment to my diabetes, I’ve set my sights on reducing my A1C to a level near 6.0 percent. You can read what these percentages translate to in blood glucose levels with this chart to the right. —> My most recent A1Cs were 6.8, then 6.4, and most recently 5.9. At last, I’ve reached my goal! But this was no accident. In addition to regularly fine-tuning my insulin doses and wearing a CGM, here are 5 things that helped me lower my A1C…that might help you: Change what I view in my head as an “okay” blood sugar. For me, I feel this has the biggest part of my progress. It’s easy (and understandable) in type 1 diabetes to see a blood sugar of 145 or 150 mg/dL as a decent blood level to “hang out” at throughout the day. In reality, if this is often your average blood sugar, then your A1C will inevitably be around 7.0 percent. Which is considered healthy for long-term health in diabetes management, certa Continue reading >>

More in diabetes