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Gilbert's Syndrome Diabetes

Gilbert Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, And Treatment

Gilbert Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, And Treatment

Gilbert syndrome is an inherited genetic condition in which a person has slightly high levels of bilirubin pigment, because the liver does not process it properly. This can give a slightly yellow color, or jaundice , to the skin and eyes. It is also known as constitutional hepatic dysfunction and familial nonhemolytic jaundice. The condition is harmless, and patients do not need treatment. In the United States (U.S.), between 3 and 7 percent of people are thought to have Gilbert syndrome, but most do not realize they have it. Mild jaundice is the only sign that a person has Gilbert syndrome. Many people with Gilbert syndrome have no symptoms. Around 30 percent find out they have it by chance through routine tests. Bilirubin is made when the body breaks down red blood cells. In Gilbert syndrome, the liver does not process bilirubin effectively, due to an inherited genetic abnormality. This causes it to build up in the body. If a person has too much bilirubin, they will have jaundice, a yellow tinge to the whites of the eyes. The skin, too, can take on a yellowish tinge, if levels rise further. Extremely high levels of bilirubin can cause itching, but this does not occur in Gilbert's syndrome, because the levels of bilirubin are not that high. Factors that may result in a mild rise in bilirubin levels and make symptoms more obvious include: Bilirubin levels do not reach very high levels with Gilbert's syndrome, but the jaundice can be disturbing. A person with Gilbert's syndrome is unlikely to have specific symptoms, beyond some yellowing of the eyes. Some people may experience fatigue and abdominal discomfort, but experts have made no connection between higher bilirubin levels and these symptoms. Experts say there is no need for a change in diet, although alcohol should Continue reading >>

Gilbert Syndrome - Nord (national Organization For Rare Disorders)

Gilbert Syndrome - Nord (national Organization For Rare Disorders)

NORD gratefully acknowledges Namita Roy-Chowdhury, PhD, and Jayanta Roy-Chowdhury, MD, Professors of Medicine and Molecular Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Liver Research Center, for assistance in the preparation of this report. Gilbert syndrome is a mild genetic liver disorder in which the body cannot properly process bilirubin, a yellowish waste product that is formed when old or worn out red blood cells are broken down (hemolysis). Individuals with Gilbert syndrome have elevated levels of bilirubin (hyperbilirubinemia), because they have a reduced level of a specific liver enzyme required for elimination of bilirubin. Most affected individuals have no symptoms (asymptomatic) or may only exhibit mild yellowing of the skin, mucous membranes, and whites of the eyes (jaundice). Jaundice may not be apparent until adolescence. Bilirubin levels may increase following stress, exertion, dehydration alcohol consumption, fasting, and/or infection. In some individuals, jaundice may only be apparent when triggered by one of these conditions. Gilbert syndrome is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Although Gilbert syndrome may become apparent shortly after birth, it may not be recognized for many years. Episodes of mild jaundice may appear in young adults and is more common in males than females. Frequently, episodes of jaundice are overlooked. Gilbert syndrome is associated with fluctuating levels of bilirubin in the blood (hyperbilirubinemia). Bilirubin levels may increase with stress, strain, dehydration, fasting, infection or exposure to cold. In many individuals, jaundice is only evident when one of these triggers raises the bilirubin levels. Some affected individuals have reported vague, unspecific symptoms including fatigue, weakness and gastrointesti Continue reading >>

Frontiers | The Role Of Bilirubin In Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, And Cardiovascular Diseases | Pharmacology

Frontiers | The Role Of Bilirubin In Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, And Cardiovascular Diseases | Pharmacology

Front. Pharmacol., 03 April 2012 | The role of bilirubin in diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, and Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Bilirubin belongs to a phylogenetically old superfamily of tetrapyrrolic compounds, which have multiple biological functions. Although for decades bilirubin was believed to be only a waste product of the heme catabolic pathway at best, and a potentially toxic compound at worst; recent data has convincingly demonstrated that mildly elevated serum bilirubin levels are strongly associated with a lower prevalence of oxidative stress-mediated diseases. Indeed, serum bilirubin has been consistently shown to be negatively correlated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), as well as to CVD-related diseases and risk factors such as arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. In addition, the clinical data are strongly supported by evidence arising from both in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This data not only shows the protective effects of bilirubin per se; but additionally, of other products of the heme catabolic pathway such as biliverdin and carbon monoxide, as well as its key enzymes (heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase); thus, further underlining the biological impacts of this pathway. In this review, detailed information on the experimental and clinical evidence between the heme catabolic pathway and CVD, and those related diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity is provided. All of these pathological conditions represent an important threat to human civilization, being the major killers in developed countries, with Continue reading >>

Gilbert Syndrome In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes-prevalence, Glycemic Control, And Microalbuminuria.

Gilbert Syndrome In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes-prevalence, Glycemic Control, And Microalbuminuria.

Pediatr Diabetes. 2017 Dec;18(8):803-807. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12488. Epub 2017 Jan 17. Gilbert syndrome in patients with type 1 diabetes-Prevalence, glycemic control, and microalbuminuria. Maccabi Children's Clinic, Maccabi Health Care Services, Ramat Hasharon, Israel. Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Safra Children's Hospital, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Ramat-Gan, Israel. The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Gilbert syndrome (GS) is a common hereditary condition, characterized by intermittent unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. In adults with type 2 diabetes and GS, a markedly lower prevalence of nephropathy was documented, suggesting a beneficial effect of hyperbilirubinemia. We investigated the prevalence of GS among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and the prevalence of microalbuminuria. The prevalence of GS was assessed in 401 (204 female) patients with T1DM, median age 21.0 years, (interquartile range [IQR], 15.7-27.9), median disease duration 10.8 years (IQR, 5.7-15.8); and was compared with GS prevalence in 181 children (control). The prevalence of microalbuminuria was assessed in patients with T1DM and GS (group I) and compared with that of patients with T1DM alone (group II), in a ratio of 1:2 matched by gender, age, and duration of diabetes. The prevalence of GS in TIDM patients was significantly higher than in the control group (10.7% vs 3.3% respectively, p = .004), with no gender difference. Patients with T1DM and GS had significantly lower HbA1c levels than did those with T1DM alone 7.3 1.2 vs 7.9 1.3% respectively (56 13 vs 63 14 mmol/mol), p = .02. The rate of microalbuminuria was 14.0% vs 11.0% for patients with T1DM and GS, compared with those with T1DM alone (p = .6). The occurrence of GS was Continue reading >>

Gilbert's Syndrome

Gilbert's Syndrome

At my last check-up they told me in passing that my blood tests revealed I had this syndrome, but not to worry because it wouldn't harm me. Does anyone else here have the same? I'm perfectly calm about it, but have since found that a GS help group exists in the UK, which tends to suggest that some people do suffer bad symptoms because they have this. I have to say, my other (web-based obviously) research tends to support my GP. Should I be more worried about this? I'm a type 2 who's on metformin and gliclazide. Ouch! Sorry tyrone, only wish I could help. This is the first time I've heard of the condition in adults. Up until you post I thought it was only premature babies that suffered from bilirubin problems. Voltaire said:- "It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than open one's mouth and remove all doubt!" Your Dr is right, if you have no symptoms, then you've nothing to worry about really. Many people carry this inborn error of metabolism (up to 10% of the population) with little if no symptoms and most people don't even know they have it. There are things to avoid eating to protect your liver, ie. avoiding alcohol, hydrogenated fats are not too good either as even in a 100% healthy person, the body does not know how to deal with them very well, but that's good advice for diabetics too. This doesn't mean you are at any geater risk of liver disease though. You would be surprised at how many genetic differences all of us walk about with but are none the wiser. The diabetic diet should be benificial for GS in being liver friendly, plenty of green leaved veg and fruit, not too much processed food. As I said, nothing to worry about. If you want more detailed information about the actual biochemical processes involved, let me know and I will forward them to y Continue reading >>

Hyperbilirubinemia Protects Against Aging-associated Inflammation And Metabolic Deterioration

Hyperbilirubinemia Protects Against Aging-associated Inflammation And Metabolic Deterioration

Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity Volume2016(2016), Article ID6190609, 10 pages Hyperbilirubinemia Protects against Aging-Associated Inflammation and Metabolic Deterioration 1Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Technick 5, 166 28 Prague, Czech Republic 2Institute of Physiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, Vdesk 1083, 142 20 Prague, Czech Republic 3Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Na Bojiti 3, 128 08 Prague, Czech Republic 4Institute of Biophysics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Salmovsk 1, 128 08 Prague, Czech Republic 5Institute of Endocrinology, Nrodn 8, 116 94 Prague, Czech Republic 64th Department of Internal Medicine, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, U Nemocnice 2, 128 08 Prague, Czech Republic Received 22 March 2016; Revised 31 May 2016; Accepted 7 June 2016 Copyright 2016 Jaroslav Zelenka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Mild constitutive hyperbilirubinemia is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Since these pathologies are associated with aging, inflammation, and oxidative stress, we investigated whether hyperbilirubinemia interferes with ROS homeostasis in cell cultures and with inflammation, senescence, and mitochondrial dysfunction in aged rats. Human embryonic kidney cells and rat primary fibroblasts showed a dose-dependent decrease in the ratio of oxidized/reduced glutathione, intracellular H2O2 levels, and mitochondrial ROS production, Continue reading >>

Gilbert's Syndrome - Nhs.uk

Gilbert's Syndrome - Nhs.uk

In Gilbert's syndrome, slightly higher than normallevels of a substance called bilirubin build up in the blood. Bilirubin is a yellow substance found naturally in the blood. It forms as a by-productwhen old red blood cells are broken down. Mostpeople with Gilbert's syndrome experience occasional and short-lived episodes of jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) due to the build-up of bilirubin in the blood. As Gilbert's syndrome usually only causes a slight increase in bilirubin levels, the yellowing ofjaundice is oftenmild. The eyes are usually affected most. Some people also report other problems during episodes of jaundice, including: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) a common digestive disorder that causes stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation problems concentrating and thinking clearly (brain fog) However, these problems aren't necessarilythought to be directly related to increased bilirubin levels, and could indicate a condition other than Gilberts syndrome. Around one in three people with Gilberts syndrome don't experience any symptoms at all. Therefore, you may not realise you have thesyndrome until tests for an unrelated problem are carried out. See your GPif you experience an episode of jaundice for the first time. The jaundice of Gilbert's syndrome is usually mild, but jaundice can be associated with more serious liver problems, such as cirrhosis or hepatitis C . It's therefore important to seek immediate medical advice fromyour GP if you have jaundice. If you can't get in touch with your GP, contact NHS 111 oryour local out-of-hours service for advice. If you've been diagnosed with Gilberts syndrome (see below), you don't usually need to seek medical advice during an episode of jaundice, unless you have additional or unusual sym Continue reading >>

:: Dmj :: Diabetes & Metabolism Journal

:: Dmj :: Diabetes & Metabolism Journal

This article has been cited by 1 article inWeb of Science. Estimating the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is important for making clinical decisions and establishing therapeutic strategies for individual patients with type 2 diabetes. Although current guidelines do not recommend routine screening for CVD in asymptomatic patients with diabetes [ 1 ], prognostic information is still required in clinical practice. Several risk equations using data obtained from large populations have been developed. However, a recent review shows that these risk models do not reliably predict the risk of fatal CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes [ 2 ]. If a simple circulating biomarker that enabled risk prediction models was available, it could provide information in addition to that provided by equations to readily identify diabetic patients with high or intermediate risk of CVD and thus prevent cardiovascular events. A number of markers have already been suggested, including C-reactive protein, fibrinogen [ 3 ], and vitamin D [ 4 ]; however, they are not routinely measured and confirmatory trials are still required. Bilirubin is used as a marker of cholestasis and is believed to be a toxic waste metabolite of heme catabolism, particularly in newborns. However, several studies have reported that bilirubin plays a protective role in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase (HO) producing biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO), and ferrous iron (Fe2+). There are two isoforms of HO; HO-1 is a highly inducible form responsible for oxidative stress, and HO-2 is a constitutive form with an important role in brain and testes. HO-derived CO, an important signaling gas, mediates several cytoprotective actions, in-cluding vasodilatation and reduction of inflammat Continue reading >>

Gilbert Syndrome: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Alcohol

Gilbert Syndrome: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Alcohol

What is the treatment for Gilbert syndrome? Gilbert Syndrome is a common, harmless genetic condition in which a liver enzyme essential to the disposal of bilirubin (the chemical that results from the normal breakdown of hemoglobin from red blood cells ) is abnormal. The condition has also been referred to as constitutional hepatic dysfunction and familial nonhemolytic jaundice . The enzyme abnormality in Gilbert syndrome results in mild elevations of bilirubin in the blood, particularly after starvation, consumption of alcohol, or dehydration . Gilbert syndrome is the result of a genetic mutation in the promoter region of a gene for the enzyme UGT1A (one of the enzymes called UGT glucuronosyltransferases that are important for bilirubin metabolism ). The gene is located on chromosome 2. Other types of mutations in the same gene cause the Crigler-Najjar syndrome, which is a more severe and dangerous form of hyperbilirubinemia (high bilirubin in the blood). People with two copies of the abnormal promoter region for the UGT1A gene (one inherited from each parent) have Gilbert's syndrome and elevated bilirubin levels, suggesting an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. This means that both parents require the gene for expression of the abnormality in the offspring. Gilbert syndrome is a frequent finding in people in the United States and Europe. The condition is usually detected serendipitously (purely by accident) in the course of routine blood screening. What are the symptoms of Gilbert syndrome? The elevated bilirubin pigment can sometimes cause mild yellowing ( jaundice ) of the eyes. People with Gilbert syndrome are otherwise entirely normal with no other signs or symptoms. Their liver enzyme levels in blood serum are also entirely normal. Gilbert syndrome is most Continue reading >>

Gilbert's Syndrome

Gilbert's Syndrome

In people with Gilbert's syndrome, bilirubin levels build-up in the blood. This may cause jaundice with yellowing of the eyes in some cases, but overall, it is a common and usually harmless condition. Bilirubin is the chemical produced by the normal breakdown of haemoglobin from red blood cells. In Gilbert's syndrome, enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of bilirubin are not present in sufficient amounts, resulting in a build-up of bilirubin in the blood. The condition is caused by a genetic mutation affecting the enzymes. Because people can have the condition without it causing any symptoms, Gilbert's syndrome is usually diagnosed during routine tests, or tests for other conditions, such as liver function tests. No specific treatment or lifestyle changes are needed for the condition. However, if jaundice is suspected, seek urgent medical attention. It may be caused by liver problems rather than Gilbert's syndrome. Jaundice due to Gilbert's syndrome may be triggered by other factors affecting the body, such as infections or fasting. As with any medical condition, let doctors or pharmacists know you have it before they recommend medication for other medical conditions so they can check for any that are not suitable. Continue reading >>

Effect Of Bilirubin Concentration On The Risk Of Diabetic Complications: A Meta-analysis Of Epidemiologic Studies

Effect Of Bilirubin Concentration On The Risk Of Diabetic Complications: A Meta-analysis Of Epidemiologic Studies

Effect of bilirubin concentration on the risk of diabetic complications: A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies Scientific Reports volume 7, Articlenumber:41681 (2017) Diabetes can affect many parts of the body and is associated with serious complications. Oxidative stress is a major contributor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications and bilirubin has been shown to have antioxidant effects. The number of studies on the effect of bilirubin on the risk of diabetic complications has increased, but the results are inconsistent. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to determine the relationship between bilirubin concentration and the risk of diabetic complications, and to investigate if there was a dose-response relationship. We carried out an extensive search in multiple databases. A fixed or random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled estimates. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to analyze the association between these estimates. A total of 132,240 subjects from 27 included studies were analyzed in our meta-analysis. A negative nonlinear association between bilirubin concentration and the risk of diabetic complications was identified (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.730.81), with a nonlinear association. We also found that there was a negative association between bilirubin concentration and the risk of diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that bilirubin may play a protective role in the occurrence of diabetic complications. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is an important non-communicable disease, and is a serious threat to human health and global economies. Due to population ageing, urbanization and lifestyle changes, the number of people with DM has increased sharply in both developed and devel Continue reading >>

Newcastle Hospitals - Gilbert's Syndrome

Newcastle Hospitals - Gilbert's Syndrome

We use cookies on this website to make your visit an easier and faster experience. If you continue to use our site, we'll assume that you are happy to receive cookies from our site. However, you can opt out of receiving cookies. North East & North Cumbria NHS Genomic Medicine Centre Gilberts syndrome is one of the most common genetic disorders.It is characterised by mild, fluctuating unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia, and is found in 4-7% of the general population. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable penetrance governed by other factors such as gender (much less common in adult women).50% of the population are heterozygous carriers for the condition. The source of the hyperbilirubinaemia in patients with Gilberts Syndrome is reduced activity of the enzyme glucoronyltransferase which conjugates bilirubin.There is consequently a build up of unconjugated bilirubin in the blood since only conjugated bilirubin is water soluble and able to be excreted in bile. Mild jaundice may appear under conditions of exertion, stress, fasting and infections, but the condition is otherwise asymptomatic. Many people report diffuse symptoms related to Gilberts Syndrome such as feeling tired, poor concentration, abdominal pain etc., but no clear adverse symptoms related to Gilberts Syndrome in adults have been found in scientific studies. Patients should be reassured that the syndrome is harmless but it is important not to confuse it with more serious liver conditions. Patients with Gilberts Syndrome show an elevated unconjugated bilirubin (20-90 micromoles/dl), while conjugated bilirubin is usually within the normal range, and all other tests for liver disease are normal. Continue reading >>

Gilbertssyndrome.org.uk

Gilbertssyndrome.org.uk

Welcome to the Action on Gilberts Syndrome website. Were here to bring you the latest up to date info on Gilberts Syndrome in an easy to access site. If you want updates on our progress just go sign up on the right! => You can also follow us on twitter for alerts on the latest posts and news at @GilbertsSyndrom To help keep the website funded, you can do all your Amazon shopping through this website it wont cost you a penny, but we will receive a percentage of what you spend. Click the Amazon advert below today! Action on Gilberts Syndrome has been in existence since 2003. Since then Ive collated information from other websites, published medical research, and anecdotal information from people who get in touch to tell their story. One of the biggest gaps in knowledge seems to be directly due to the lack of evidence from people with Gilberts Syndrome themselves. I hope that more studies of groups of people with this genetic condition will be done in the future. Ill keep you posted! One in 20 people may have Gilberts Syndrome (or possibly more), but only one in three of those will be aware of it, and less than one in three will have any symptoms at all. Most people who have it are men. Sometimes called Gilberts Disease, it is not in fact a disease. Most Doctors use standard reference information that tells them to tell you that Gilberts Syndrome is harmless. However, information from scientific studies illustrates that you may experience a number of symptoms, including the most common one of jaundice, and that you need to be aware of certain chemicals, including prescription medication, that you are less able to cope with. This website offers those with Gilberts Syndrome, and their family and friends, as well as the medical profession, further information from published Continue reading >>

Gilbert's Syndrome

Gilbert's Syndrome

Contents: Introduction| The Basics | Known Effects | Original Onset & Symptom Triggers | Connections To Other Problems | Great Sites In June of 2006 I decided to investigate the headaches and sinus pain I've been suffering from and discovered that I have a legion of airborne and food allergies. I have been trying different medicines and doing research and it looks like most of my symptoms and their cycles can be attributed to these allergies. My symptoms are somewhat atypical, which is why I hadn't suspected it. Does this mean Gilbert's Syndrome (GS) was not behind my problems? That depends. It might be related to the development of these allergies. Studies show that people with GS are four times more likely to have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), and also that 75% of those with CFS have allergies. In fact, some suggest that CFS is the effect of chronic allergies. For more information on allergies, and to hear more about my story, check out the new section on allergies . This is a work in progress and is being updated from time to time. Check back, as I will be steadily improving the site and adding more information. Help advance the understanding of Gilbert's Syndrome, CFS/ME, Hypothyroidism, Candida, and other problems by taking this survey. This anonymous survey collects detailed information on symptoms, experiences, diet, medications, and more. The results of these surveys generate real-time graphs of trends which will help us on the road to feeling better. This survey is also for those feeling generally well, which provides a comparison. The first results have been coming in. View the Results This site is dedicated to the understanding of Gilbert's Syndrome and its many symptoms and related problems. It's dedicated to answers, and I invite people with GIlbert's Sy Continue reading >>

(pre)diabetes & Gilbert's Disease/syndrome

(pre)diabetes & Gilbert's Disease/syndrome

(Pre)Diabetes & Gilbert's Disease/Syndrome Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. (Pre)Diabetes & Gilbert's Disease/Syndrome I'm new to this pre-D, D thing so I've been reading the informative posts on this site and I notice a good many of them speak about the liver and what role it plays in glucose metabolism, pre-D and D. Ever since I was a little girl, the "whites" of my eyes.....well, aren't. They have always been yellow, to the point that a new pediatrician I started seeing at age 6 started flipping out about it...frantic that I needed testing for hepatitis and a myriad of other liver disorders. The liver enzymes came back fine but my bilirubin was elevated. She concluded that I had a genetic "disorder" called Gilbert's (pronounced Zhil-bear's)Disease and that it was absolutely nothing to worry about, just a "benign elevation of bilirubin". These days, most physicians refer to it as Gilbert's Syndrome because, as one physician put it with a sneer, "you really can't call something that is that benign a disease". Allegedly, Gilbert's causes no symptoms or contributes to any other disease and will not progress into true liver disease, i. e. cirrhosis or liver failure. About 20 years ago, when the Hepatitis B vaccine first came out, I got the 3-shot series. I was told by my physician at the time that the Gilbert's wouldn't be a reason NOT to get it. Recently, Doc said the original vaccine wasn't necessarily always effective and he wanted to run a Hep B titer to make sure I still maintained immunity. My titer was 0...no immunity whatsoever. Doc recommended receiving the 3-shot series again, which I did. Coincidentally, I felt horr Continue reading >>

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