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Gestational Diabetes Too Few Carbs

175 Grams Of Carbs? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

175 Grams Of Carbs? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I feel really dumb. First of all, I am a nurse. Second, this is my second pregnancy with GD. This time around my doc just ordered me test strips and I've been checking my sugars and following the diet since 16 weeks. I am currently 34 weeks pregnant. Well, yesterday I stumbled upon my old GD info booklet. I totally forgot that there was a minimum number of carbs I had to eat. I didn't forgo carbs completely, but I probably was only eating 100-130 grams a day, some days less. My doctor doesn't have me check for ketones and has never mentioned it. My blood sugars have been pretty good with the occasional rogue one. I bought urine test strips for ketones today and I have between a trace and small amount in my urine, but that's also with eating the right amount of carbs since yesterday. I am gaining weight but probably not enough, though that happened with my last pregnancy too. (I gained a total of 21 lbs, this time I've gained 16 lbs so far.) Now I'm convinced my baby has brain damage because of my blatant stupidity. I'm a nurse, how on earth could I have let this happen? I hate myself for it. I'm going to mention it to my doctor at my appointment on Friday. I know the studies about ketones are controversial as they are old and don't all conclude to a lower IQ, and even if they did, there is no point in worrying now! All I can do now is maintain a good carb intake from here on out. I guess I'm looking for reassurance. Anyone else eat less carbs than they're supposed to? Anyone else's doctor okay with it? Do most GD moms check for ketones? Thanks guys. Also yes my dr was ok with everything she was actually very happy with the whole pregnancy said I did a great job for me and baby! I don't check for ketones. I also was not told that there was a magic number of carbs I had Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes, which causes higher-than-normal blood sugar levels to be present, occurs during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes testing usually occurs between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for diabetes, your doctor may recommend testing earlier in the pregnancy. If you receive a gestational diabetes diagnosis, you’ll need testing 6 to 12 weeks after giving birth to see whether the diabetes is still present. Gestational diabetes usually resolves after you deliver, although you’re at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, gestational diabetes affects 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of having a large baby, which may cause problems with delivery. It also increases the risk of having a baby born with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Respiratory distress, jaundice, and low calcium and magnesium levels are also more common in babies whose mothers have gestational diabetes. There’s a higher risk of your baby developing diabetes later in life as well. Changing your diet is generally the first method of treatment for gestational diabetes. The amount of calories you should consume each day depends on a number of factors, such as your weight and activity level. Pregnant women should generally increase their calorie consumption by 300 calories per day from their prepregnancy diet. Doctors recommend three meals and two to three snacks per day. Eating smaller meals more frequently can help you keep your blood sugar levels stable. Your doctor will likely recommend that you monitor your blood sugar levels to help manage gestational diabetes. Testing your blood sugar after meals tells you how that meal affected your blood sugar. Your d Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Now Hypoglycemia From Too Many Carbs??

Gestational Diabetes Now Hypoglycemia From Too Many Carbs??

Gestational Diabetes Now Hypoglycemia from Too Many Carbs?? First off, I will be consulting my doctor about this and am not asking for medical advice, just looking to see if anyone has experienced anything remotely similar. I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes a few months ago (1st time, 4th pregnancy) and successfully managed it with a very low carb diet. When I did overdo the carbs and my blood sugar got into the high range (120-130s), I had horrible indigestion and reflux, something that plagued this entire pregnancy and occasionally bothered me before getting pregnant. I am now almost 3 weeks postpartum and was cleared immediately after delivery to resume a "normal" diet. I am still bothered by the same indigestion symptoms when I overdo the carbs. I've decided to spot-test my blood sugar when I feel sick, to see if I can find a connection to my symptoms, however the results are opposite what they were during pregnancy and opposite what I expected. Now, when I feel sick from too many carbs, my blood sugar is low (60s). Can't really make sense of it, and again I will be talking to my doctor, but I was just wondering if anyone else experienced anything similar? Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Won't Help In Gestational Diabetes

Low Carb Diet Won't Help In Gestational Diabetes

Low Carb Diet Won't Help in Gestational Diabetes by Todd Neale Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today® and: Note that this small randomized study demonstrated that a low carbohydrate diet was not superior to a control diet in reducing insulin use among women with gestational diabetes. Be aware that pregnancy outcomes were similar in both groups as well. Simply reducing dietary carbohydrate content was not an effective way to forestall the need for insulin among women with gestational diabetes, a randomized trial showed. The percentage of patients who were started on insulin was 54.7% both among those who ate a low-carbohydrate diet and among those who ate a diet with a normal level of carbohydrates (P=1.00), according to Didac Mauricio, MD, PhD, of the University of Lleida in Spain, and colleagues. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were similar in the two groups as well, the researchers reported online in Diabetes Care. "Therefore, the amount of carbohydrates [in] the diet may not be a key issue in future clinical recommendations on medical nutrition therapy of gestational diabetes," they wrote. "Additional randomized intervention studies that consider different populations and different strategies to modify glycemic load are warranted to assess the optimal [approach]," they wrote. Medical nutrition therapy has formed the basis of treatment for gestational diabetes, and has been centered on modifying the amount and distribution of carbohydrates to maintain glycemic control without ketosis, according to the researchers. In recent years, the therapy has been aimed primarily at modifying the glycemic index, but there is little evidence-based information on specific approaches to managing the condition. The curre Continue reading >>

Are You Confused About Carbs?

Are You Confused About Carbs?

Carbs can confuse many people. To be able to follow a good diet for gestational diabetes you need to understand a bit about carbohydrates and where you'll find them. Not knowing which foods and drinks are high in carbs can be detrimental to trying to control your blood sugar levels and whilst most know that sugar should be cut out of the diet with gestational diabetes, many do not realise that carbohydrates are a problem too. Carbohydrates turn into glucose in the bloodstream (therefore carbs are pretty much sugar as far as we're concerned) and eating anything high in carbs will raise blood sugar levels. The other problem is that certain carbs can turn into glucose in the bloodstream very quickly. This can be seen as the red line in the diagram below... If carbs raise blood sugar levels why can't we just cut them out? Cutting carbohydrates out of the diet, or restricting them very low will lower blood sugar levels, but the problem with doing this is that it causes the body to go into a ketosis state, burning fat for energy instead of glucose. It can also make you feel lethargic too. The problem with burning fat instead of glucose is that when you are pregnant, the acid that is produced as a result of the body doing this, called ketones, can be harmful to the growing baby if ketones are produced in high amounts. Therefore it is important to continue to eat small amounts of carbohydrates at each meal where possible and to stay well hydrated. You can read more about ketosis on our ketones page. Different types of carbs Carbohydrates can be found in most foods and drinks. Carbs are made up of three different things: sugar, starch and fibre. There are different types of carbs and this is where it can get very confusing as many may just think of carbs as bread, pasta and rice Continue reading >>

Can Low Carb Help With Gestational Diabetes In Pregnancy?

Can Low Carb Help With Gestational Diabetes In Pregnancy?

When Natalie Thompson Cooper was diagnosed with gestational diabetes in her first pregnancy, at age 28, she was very concerned. The condition, which affects at least one in seven pregnancies to as many as one in five, causes blood sugars to rise abnormally high, called hyperglycemia. 1 Natalie knew hyperglycemia bathed her unborn daughter in glucose, putting the fetus at risk for a wide range of potential complications, including miscarriage, birth defects, macrosomia (very large size), high blood pressure, birth trauma, and higher rates of C-section and even stillbirth. 2 Moreover, gestational diabetes (GD) — also called ‘carbohydrate intolerance of pregnancy’ — greatly increases the risk that the mother and her offspring will both face future health problems, such as much higher rates of eventual type 2 diabetes, metabolic conditions, and cardiovascular disease. 3 GD is one of the most common and significant complications of pregnancy. Prenatal guidelines the world over recommend the routine screening of all pregnant women and then, if positive, strict management, starting with dietary therapy, then if that does not work, insulin injections. 4 However, to this day, what constitutes the best “dietary therapy” is hotly debated, with some researchers proposing a diet high in complex carbohydrates (60% carbs) and others lower carbohydrates (40% carbs). 5 However, the recommended “lower carb” GD diet is still far higher than the under 20 g per day of the strict low-carb high-fat or ketogenic diet. In fact, many guidelines for GD recommend women, on an ostensibly “lower-carb” diet, eat a minimum 175 g of carbohydrate daily, a level at which many women see their blood sugar rise out of control. “Honestly, 175 g of carbohydrate is stupid! Women should be Continue reading >>

Not Diagnosed But Given No Carb Diet

Not Diagnosed But Given No Carb Diet

Hi everyone. First post and first pregnancy here! Went to my first OB appointment yesterday. All is good and I have not actually been diagnosed with GD but she point blank put me on a no carb diet, I am sure because of my weight. No bread, no pasta, no rice, no potato, no grains, no bananas, no fruits high on the glycemic index, absolutely no sugar. I'm really struggling with this! I know I sound whiny and I have no right to complain. I told my doc that I'm going to do whatever she tells me so I can have a healthy pregnancy and healthy baby which is more important than anything... But the thought of not one piece of chocolate or one scoop of ice cream until August is making me seriously cranky lol I asked if I should just Google a GD diet and she said yes and to follow but most GD diets I've looked up include some carbs and whole grains and she eliminated all of that! What are your thoughts? Is it safe for me to occasionally, like once a week, to have a small sweet treat? Is my doc being over the top assuming I'll slip up somewhere so cutting all those main sources of carbs and sugars will compensate? Looking for honest feedback... tell it to me like it is. I want to do what's best but I'm just dreading this boring diet! As far as I know, you have to have carbs on the GD diet. They encourage whole grains over white flour, brown rice over white, etc, but I've been told I have to eat a certain number of carbs per meal/day. I started this journey overweight and, other than being given a pretty strict weight gain goal, I've never been told to restrict anything... before or after my GD diagnosis (around 28 weeks). I'd find out more from your doctor or get a second opinion! This doesn't sound right. She said absolutely no carbs at all?? Or just complex carbs? Carbs are natur Continue reading >>

Balancing Low Carb Diet And Ketones

Balancing Low Carb Diet And Ketones

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am 34 weeks pregnant and was diagnosed with GBD about 2 months ago. Since then i really cut down on carbs and sugar in my diet and was also put on 1500mg glucophage per day. I monitor my blood sugar levels a couple of times a day and they have been more or less under control (average under 100 when fasting and depending on the food i eat, the random blood sugar ranges from 115-140. There have been a few times when sugar has gone up to 170 or so, but those have been rare cases). I recently got my HbA1c test done and it was 5.1, which my doctor was really happy about. However, i also got a urine test done, which shows my ketone levels at 5. My doctor showed a little bit of concern at this level and said i need to increase my fluids and not starve myself (which i have not been doing, just avoiding carbs and sugar). When i looked up this level of ketones on the internet, it seems really, almost dangerously high. I am just wondering if anyone else has been in this situation. How does one remove ketones without adding carbs to the diet? Not if someone is taking a SGLT2 Inhibitors e.g. Then a very high level of ketones must be investigated with a blood gas test regardless of the BG level. Also there has been no research on levels of ketones when pregnant, as the legel setup means no one will every get the insurance to do it. However @ Fatimshaider_ I think you are doing OK, but drinking more water would not be a bad ideal. By testing your BG before meals and 2hr after a meal you can find the meals that most effect your BG and modify them. I am 34 weeks pregnant and was diagnosed with GBD about 2 months ago. Since then i really cut down on carbs and sugar i Continue reading >>

Please Eat Enough Carbs

Please Eat Enough Carbs

I had my baby 3+ months ago. I woke up some mornings with full of regrets not because I indulged myself but because I was too strict with GD diet. I regret that I might've cut out too much carbs which might've impacted my baby negatively. I was trying so hard to be "diet-controlled.". Thinking back, it might've been better to eat more and be on meds if needed. Please discuss with your doctor. May I ask how big was your baby at birth and how is baby doing now? Just wondering why you feel this way now. I am struggling at 30 weeks over here and diet controlled for now and really not wanting meds I've seen you post about regrets and feeling bad many times. Was your baby born super small? Sometimes even with eating properly and doing everything babies are simply born small. My sister was two weeks late with her little boy and didn't have gd and he was born under 6 lbs. He was healthy and he's a very sporty, strong healthy eleven year old boy. I'm trying to figure out why having a smaller baby is causing you so much stress. Is baby ok? If so, I think maybe you should discuss your regrets and feelings with a dr to make sure you aren't actually dealing with depression rather than just regrets. I was diet controlled, delivered at 38 weeks (my water broke) and baby was 7 lbs 2 oz. None of that mattered as long as his sugars were ok and he was healthy. Also, you say eat enough carbs-did u eat too few? I was eating 175-180 grams of carbs a day, so I never felt like I wasn't getting enough carbs. Also I hope I'm. It coming off as rude, I am really concerned about how your feelings and just trying to understand more. My baby was 5 lbs 10 oz at birth. He is doing fine overall. However, towards the end of my pregnancy, I bought some Ketone tests on Amazon and it showed I had Ketones, Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Diet: Taking Carbs From A Pregnant Lady

The Gestational Diabetes Diet: Taking Carbs From A Pregnant Lady

When I decided, at age 40, that I wanted to try to have a child, I knew I faced a few elevated risks over younger women: first and foremost, I might not be able to conceive at all. I mentally prepared myself—as much as I could, anyway—for that and other possibilities, including the higher risk of the baby having a genetic defect. So far I’ve been fortunate. The one risk I hadn’t given much thought to—the higher chance of developing gestational diabetes—is the only one that has been a factor in my pregnancy. I’m fairly healthy, I have no history of diabetes in my family, and I try to eat well—lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and few highly processed junk foods. But older pregnant women—and that means even women as young as in their late 20s, believe it or not—can have a harder time regulating insulin, leading to increased blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes, if not controlled through diet and exercise, can cause high-birth-weight babies and potentially lead to delivery complications, as well as increasing the risk that the child will develop obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. For the mother, there’s also the risk of high blood pressure and a higher likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. I haven’t been diagnosed with gestational diabetes so far. But because my blood sugar was a little high during my early glucose tolerance test (this is given to all pregnant women around 28 weeks, but women of my age are also sometimes tested earlier), I was advised to exercise more frequently and follow a low-carbohydrate diet, the same advice given to those with the diagnosis. The last thing a pasta-loving pregnant lady with a sweet tooth wants to hear is that she should cut out carbs. I have always been skeptical of the low-carb Continue reading >>

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

As with many issues related to pregnancy and parenting, there are many myths and misconceptions about gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes has been a controversial topic for some time, with even world famous obesterician, Michel Odent, weighing in on the matter. Some medical and health professionals believe gestational diabetes (not to be confused with type 1 diabetes) is a “diagnosis looking for a disease”, because the steps to manage it is exactly the same as the advice to prevent it – with diet. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are given a label, without any evidence to show that the label improves outcomes. Low carb, high healthy fat eating, quitting smoking and exercise is how you prevent and treat insulin resistance. As Doctor Chatterjee says, “Our genes load the gun, but it's our environment that pulls the trigger”. Our addiction to sugar and processed foods is literally making us — and our future children — sick. If you haven't yet read about the 3 year old who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it's a must read. Women Need Educating, Not Testing A diagnosis of gestational diabetes results in the very advice which should already be given to all pregnant women — long before their glucose tolerance tests. They should eat a low GI diet, eliminate sugar and processed grains, as well as get some daily exercise. Very wise advice for all of us, regardless if we're pregnant or not. A recent study concluded, “A low GI diet was associated with less frequent insulin use and lower birth weight than control diets, suggesting that it is the most appropriate dietary intervention to be prescribed to patients with GDM [gestational diabetes mellitus].” However, the vast majority of doctors and midwives are not trained nutritionists, dieticians Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Lives in Vancouver, BC, and has a doctorate in social work and education from McGill University Correspondence: Dr Carmen Lavoie, 512 W 21st, North Vancouver, BC V7M 1Z7; telephone 604 971-0966; e-mail [email protected]_nemrac Copyright the College of Family Physicians of Canada Cet article est disponible en franais. Voyez " Diabte gestationnel ". For the first time in my life I had to watch what I ate. Results of a glucose tolerance test at 22 weeks of my first pregnancy revealed that I had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Thereafter, I was caught up in an intense regimen of medical intervention, which included ketosis check 3 times per day (read: peeing on a stick), laboratory tests (read: peeing in a cup) on average once per week, nonstress tests twice a week toward the end of the pregnancy (still peeing in a cup), and of course, appointments for dietary counseling. I worked hard every day to control my blood glucose levels, faithfully following the schedule of poking, peeing, injecting, and exercising. I wanted to be a compliant patient: if I could not do what was necessary to ensure the health of my unborn child, what kind of mother would I be? With a diagnosis of GDM, my score as a good mom was on the line. What exactly were the target blood glucose levels? Interestingly, what seemed fine for one family doctor concerned another. Then there was the obstetrician who disagreed with both family doctors. I found different approaches to target blood glucose levels and different approaches to insulin dosing. The only topic I could be sure to get agreement on was diet. Canadas Food Guide versus low-carbohydrate diet Canadas Food Guide 1 seems to be the cornerstone of dietary counseling for patients with diabetesif I could just learn to follow the food guide then suppo Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Ineffective For Gestational Diabetes

Low-carb Diet Ineffective For Gestational Diabetes

Low-Carb Diet Ineffective for Gestational Diabetes A diet that contains a low amount of calories from carbohydrates does not reduce the need for insulin treatment in women with gestational diabetes or affect pregnancy outcomes, according to a new study published online April 5 in Diabetes Care. "I believe that we should start rethinking the role of the glycemic load of the diet in the treatment of gestational diabetes ," senior author Didac Mauricio, MD, PhD, from the University of Lleida, Spain, told Medscape Medical News. "In addition, further research is needed in this area of medical nutritional therapy [MNT] in gestational diabetes, in pregnancy, and in the management of diabetes mellitus, generally speaking," he said. MNT is the mainstay of gestational diabetes treatment and is based on controlling the amount and distribution of carbohydrates to obtain optimal glycemic control without ketosis. In Spain, guidelines state that if MNT is not sufficient to control blood glucose levels, insulin should be started. However, there are no randomized controlled trials that demonstrate an advantage of a diet with a prespecified amount of carbohydrate in reducing the need for insulin, Dr. Mauricio explained. He and his team addressed the issue by randomly assigning 152 women with gestational diabetes to follow either a low-carbohydrate diet, where 40% of the total caloric content was carbohydrate, or a control diet, which consisted of 55% carbohydrate. Protein content, which was 20%, was similar in both diets. The mean gestational age at the time of enrollment was 30.4 weeks for the low-carbohydrate group and 30.1 weeks for the control group, and the mean age of the women in the low-carbohydrate group was 33.5 years for the low-carb group and 32.1 years for the control group Continue reading >>

Too Few Carbs? - Dieting And Nutrition For Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Too Few Carbs? - Dieting And Nutrition For Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi all. I'm new to this forum. I have been eating relatively low carb (60 grams) for about 4 months now. Eating this way has allowed me to keep my blood sugars in a pre-diabetic/normal range, lose weight and feel so much better! I have been keeping a food journal and although my fasting numbers had been staying in the 80's before, now I am seeing them in the high 90's/low 100's every morning and throughout the day as well. Upon reviewing my journal I see that my carbs have dropped more like down to 30 or so a day ( maybe I've been a bit too compulsive about this???). Anyway, I'm wondering if anyone else has see this happen to them - is it possible I have lowered my carbs too much and have actually shot myself in the foot? Or bitten the hand that feeds me??? Is it possible that not eating enough carbs could raise my blood sugar? Sometimes before a meal comes around feel hungry and then when I check my sugar at the meal it is higher (like 110 or 120) and I don't want to eat many carbs then for fear of making it worse. Is my thinking all wrong?This last month for me has been extremely busy (lots of visitors and then a two week trip away from home.) Thanks in advance for any counsel you can give. I have spend hours reading here and have learned so much already! As a long term type 1 and on a very low carb diet I can tell you without doubt that you must measure or otherwise limit the proteins, fats, and green vegtables taken in. That was the biggest surprise to me. I need to take a bolus of insulin with everything I eat to keep the sugars level. If I eat an extra helping of salad I will need to ca Continue reading >>

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