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Gestational Diabetes Test With A Cold

Gestational Diabetes Test With A Cold/sinus??

Gestational Diabetes Test With A Cold/sinus??

Gestational diabetes test with a cold/sinus?? You may view most areas of the forum without registering. If you wish to post, you do need to register . It's FREE! Gestational diabetes test with a cold/sinus?? I was going to go in for my GD test on Monday. But I have come down with a horrid cold/sinus infection. Should I wait til I feel 100%? Will it affect my levels? I have GD and a recent flu definitely affected my levels. Sent from my iPhone using The Bub Hub mobile app Being sick can definitely throw your levels out. You won't need to wait until you're 100% better, if you mostly feel good by Monday then you can still get it done, otherwise put it off for a couple more days. Yep, leave it for a few days if you can. When you're sick it does affect your levels. I have GD as well and I've had a funny tummy the last few days - it's certainly had an impact on my sugar levels too. Thanks ladies, I will see how I feel on Monday, of course it is about the only day for a while that DH can look after the other munchkins for me. By Kleep81 in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat By heartstringz in forum Second Trimester Chat By BubinDec in forum Second Trimester Chat Weekly eNewsletter Sign Up Pregnancy Week-by-Week Email Maternity Clothes Looking to buy maternity clothes?:: Check the bubhub directory of local & online maternity clothes shops:: Find ... Top 100 baby names in Australia Charlotte still reigns! Starting solids 5 ways to keep first foods simple 7 things you should know about having a healthy baby "Replaced good quality with cheap tight nappies" Snap, Zip, Go. Join the hands-free movement! When you've got a baby or a toddler, you never have enough hands! Help is here in the stylish shape of VIVRA. These purses lock onto your waistband so you can exercise or have fun Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Colds

Diabetes And Colds

Colds aren't fun for anyone, but if you have diabetes, all that sniffling and sneezing comes with an extra risk. When you're sick, there's a chance your blood sugar levels could go up. Some smart strategies can get you back on track. Why Is My Blood Sugar Going Up? When you have a cold, your body sends out hormones to fight the infection. The downside: That makes it hard for you to use insulin properly, and your blood sugar levels may rise. If you have type 1 diabetes and your blood sugar levels get hard to manage, it can lead to problems like ketoacidosis. That's a buildup of too much acid in your blood and it's potentially life-threatening. If you have type 2 diabetes, especially if you're older, very high blood sugar can bring on a serious condition called diabetic coma. How Often Should I Check My Blood Sugar? Check it at least every 3 or 4 hours when you're sick with a cold. If your levels aren't near your target, you can tweak your diabetes management plan -- your doctor may tell you to use more insulin if your blood sugar levels are too high. What Should I Eat and Drink? You may not feel hungry when you first get sick, but it's important to try to eat something anyway. You can have foods from your regular meal plan. The American Diabetes Association recommends you try to eat something with about 15 grams of carbohydrates every hour or so. Some foods to try: 3-ounce fruit juice bar 1/2 cup frozen yogurt 1/2 cup cooked cereal If you don't eat, your blood sugar might fall too low. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. If you have a fever, vomiting, or diarr Continue reading >>

Factors That Can Affect The Glucose Tolerance Test

Factors That Can Affect The Glucose Tolerance Test

Factors that Can Affect the Glucose Tolerance Test I have failed the glucose tolerance test in half of my pregnancies. In the first and fourth, I failed the one hour test and had to go for the three hour. As anyone who has gone though this can attest, it is not an enjoyable experience. The test takes three hours and you cant eat after midnight on the night before the test. So if the lab opens at nine in the morning, you wont eat until lunchtime. Most pregnant women dont fare well when they skip eating for the morning. I know I didnt. What I never realized is the factors that affect the test and what can be done to improve the odds of passing. Certain medications can affect the test, causing you to fail. Talk to your health care provider about any prescription medications you may be taking before scheduling the test. Some fairly common medications can have a negative effect. Some of these wont be a problem right now, such as birth control pills. A few of the other drugs that can affect the test include certain blood pressure medications, anti inflammatory drugs known as NSAIDS and seizure medications. You can prepare for the test by eating a healthy diet in the days leading up to the glucose test. A healthy diet that includes complex carbohydrates is the best choice. Include foods such as fruits, vegetables, rice, grains, bread, cereal and crackers for three days before the test. Carbs are important because people who follow low carb diets tend to do poorly on the glucose test. If you are not feeling well on the day of the test, you may want to reschedule. In some cases, an illness can affect the glucose tolerance test. Fever, vomiting or infection are some of the symptoms that may warrant postponing the test. Should you decide to wait, dont wait to long to reschedule t Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

Most of the food people eat is turned directly into glucose when digested, and the body uses it as energy. The pancreas is responsible for making the hormone insulin which helps to get glucose into the cells of the body. Diabetes is a long-term disease that occurs due to the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the body being unable to use the insulin it produces effectively. The body is unable to process food properly to use for energy. Glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to severe health problems. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and is also known as juvenile diabetes. With type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin. According to The American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In people with type 2 diabetes, their body does not use insulin properly, which is known as insulin resistance. The pancreas responds by making more insulin to cover the deficiency but is not able to keep blood glucose at normal levels. As glucose builds up in the blood, the body's cells do not receive the energy they need. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Glucose tolerance test: Testing for diabetes A simple blood test can often detect diabetes. If the test produces borderline results, a glucose tolerance test may help with the final diagnosis. In a healthy person, glucose levels will rise after eating a meal and return to normal once the glucose is used or stored by the body. A glucose tolerance test can help to work out the difference between normal glucose levels and the levels seen in diabetes and prediabetes. The glucose tolerance test is used to measure t Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to properly use sugar (glucose) as a source of fuel. As a result, the levels of sugar in the blood become abnormally high. When this condition occurs during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Impact Gestational diabetes affects about 2–10 percent of all pregnancies. It usually begins in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy and goes away after the baby is born. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, obesity, high blood pressure, increasing age and a close relative with diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Ramifications Gestational diabetes can result in complications for mother and baby. Women with gestational diabetes are more likely to get high blood pressure or pre-eclampsia. They have an increased chance of needing a Cesarean delivery. Babies of women who have gestational diabetes are more likely to develop jaundice. They also may grow too large, leading to an increased risk of birth trauma. Complications can be avoided by controlling gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can usually be well controlled through a combination of close monitoring, diet, exercise and occasionally the administration of medication. You will be instructed to go to the lab at your convenience or call to schedule time. The lab will provide the glucose solutions to drink and you will need to remain in the clinic for the duration of the test (about one hour). Gestational Diabetes Screening Test Testing for gestational diabetes is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for gestational diabetes, you may be tested earlier. For accurate results, it is very important that you follow these instructions exactly. You do not need Continue reading >>

How Can I Treat A Cold During Pregnancy?

How Can I Treat A Cold During Pregnancy?

You are here: Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy Tips How can I treat a cold during pregnancy? Posted by Admin on September 8th, 2015 12:34 PM Colds are typical in maternity, and also have the tendency to last longer. Avoid combo OTC drugs or long-acting drugs. Many OTC medicines could be safely used in pregnancy, but you must consult your carrier first. Be sure to be seen if you are having severe or long term symptoms. While the acute rhinitis is consistently aggravating, it ares more of a trouble to capture one while expecting! Expectant ladies are much more vulnerable to infections as a result of their decreased body immune system, so this could make colds take place much more typically and last much longer. The nasal passages are already susceptible to being expanded as well as therefore stuffy in pregnancy, so a cold can only make this worse. Below are some points you can attempt to treat the acute rhinitis in pregnancy. Many over-the-counter (OTC) drugs can be made use of in maternity if they are utilized on a short-term basis. If you have the choice, avoid medications that are long-acting, extended-release, optimal strength, consist of liquor, or are a mix of a number of elements. As always, you need to consult your provider initially prior to starting any brand-new medications. To assistance combat high temperature as well as the pains related to colds, acetaminophen(Tylenol) could be securely utilized. A recent research out of Norway connected Tylenol use with poorer electric motor skills and also some delayed milestones in children born to mothers who took this medicine, but this remained in women that made use of the drug for an extended amount of time (as long as 28 days!). Consequently, utilize it when needed however stay clear of prolonged consumption. The fa Continue reading >>

Can Cold Weather Reduce The Risk For Gestational Diabetes?

Can Cold Weather Reduce The Risk For Gestational Diabetes?

Can Cold Weather Reduce the Risk for Gestational Diabetes? Authors: News Author: Veronica Hackethal, MD; CME Author: Charles P. Vega, MD Physicians - maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) Family Physicians - maximum of 0.25 AAFP Prescribed credit(s) ABIM Diplomates - maximum of 0.25 ABIM MOC points Nurses - 0.25 ANCC Contact Hour(s) (0 contact hours are in the area of pharmacology) This article is intended for primary care clinicians, obstetrician-gynecologists, endocrinologists, nurses, and other clinicians who care for women at risk for gestational diabetes mellitus. The goal of this activity is to provide medical news to primary care clinicians and other healthcare professionals in order to enhance patient care. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Evaluate the physiology of glucose metabolism during pregnancy Assess the association between ambient temperature and the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus Disclosure: Veronica Hackethal, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Disclosure: Robert Morris, PharmD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Disclosure: Amy Bernard, MS, BSN, RN-BC, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Health Sciences Clinical Professor, UC Irvine Department of Family Medicine; Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California Disclosure: Charles P. Vega, MD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Served as an advisor or consultant for: McNeil Consumer Healthcare Served as a speaker or a member of a speakers bureau for: Shire Pharmaceuticals In support of improving patient care, Medscape, LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Co Continue reading >>

Gtt With A Cold? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Gtt With A Cold? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Should I wait until I have got rid of my cold, (sore throat, runny nose and aches) before I go for my 3rd GTT? Will it effect the result? I have had two, 3 months apart, and it's time for my 3rd this week, but with feeling rough I have put it off, but this cold is lurking so don't know if I am going to have to go and do the GTT anyway. Bit of background, I had Gestational diabetes with my 2nd pregnancy, ended up on insulin in the last 8 weeks of pregnancy, but it went after the birth. I asked if I should be tested regularly as they told me I would more than likely end up diabetic, but the doctor never sent me for a test, until I mentioned it (5 years after birth). Came back 'borderline' can't remember exact result, think the fasting was 6.7 an 2 hours later 6.9 , 2nd test the nurse said my fasting had gone down (6.2 I think) but my 2hr reading was higher, so I would need a 3rd GTT and if it came back the same I would have to see the doctor and probably end up on medication. I was just told by the nurse to use diet control....given a quick portion size talk, cut out sugar and that was it! Should know it all from gestational diabetes but I seem to have forgotten most of it! I do have my meter from then, so got a new battery and some test strips from ebay. So I am going to try for myself and see what results I get. Seen the doc, I am not 'diabetic' but 'insulin resistant' when fasting.... Told me I could go on medication if I wanted, but wouldn't be classed diabetic. Told me Continue reading >>

1 Hour Glucose Test

1 Hour Glucose Test

The lab tech did a GREAT job on my blood draw! Im not a fan of needles or puncturing my veins, but I swear I didnt feel it. Shes been a nurse for 40 years, so she just smiled. Some recommendations for your 1 hour glucose test: 1. Bring a bottle of water to drink during the test. 2. Bring some food to eat immediately after the second blood draw. 3. Bring something to entertain yourself for an hour. I read a magazine but I would much rather have been on my Nintendo DS or on my laptop. I got my test done at 26 weeks. My doc does everyones test at 26 weeks. Still havent got the results yet, Ill let yall know! Helpful (0) @mightySapphire I brought unsweetened tea with me and they wouldnt let me drink it or anything else until after the test. I was sooo thirsty too because of the sweetness of the drink. I didnt think the drink tasted bad I just really wanted to wash the sweetness down! I forgot I was taking the test the day that I had to. They had told me not to have anything sweet before I came in. I ate toast with jelley followed by candy and some fruit juice before the test. whoops! I thought for sure I would fail it because of all of the sugar I had downed, but it was good. Helpful (0) @rnc620: Every lab has different rules. Some require a 12 hour fast before the test, some dont. Some let you drink water, some dont. (Which is silly since youd have to consume A LOT of water to effect the test.) My lab didnt require fasting for the 1 hour test, but since I already was, they got me in early (bonus!). Eating beforehand affects your baseline blood draw, and your subsequent draws. But if they see anything unusual in your results, theyll have you take the three hour test. Helpful (0) Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

Regular diabetes is caused by either: (1) the pancreas not producing enough insulin (Type 1 diabetes) (2) the body not responding to the insulin (Type 2 diabetes). Without enough good, working insulin in your body, you end up with too much glucose in the blood and not enough in your cells.Insulin helps the cells take in glucose produced from the foods you eat, which, in turn, supplies the energy for your body. Gestational diabetes happens only during pregnancy, usually around the 24th week. It somewhat is like Type 2 diabetes when your pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin doesn’t work as it should. This is because during this time in your pregnancy, your placenta begins making large amounts of hormones. Some of these hormones may stop the insulin from helping the cells absorb glucose from the blood. At the same time, your pancreas can’t keep up with the extra demand for insulin. Without enough good, working insulin in your body, you end up with too much glucose in the blood and not enough in your cells. If your cells can’t get enough glucose, your body won’t have enough energy to work and play. Also, the extra glucose in your blood can be dangerous. This condition, called hyperglycemia, is how diabetes is diagnosed. As more and more sugar builds up in your blood, it spills over into your urine. So sugar in your urine is another sign of diabetes. Too much sugar in your urine pulls water from your body, causing you to feel thirsty. Even though you drink plenty of water, you still feel thirsty. Drinking a lot of water also causes you to go to the bathroom often. Feeling thirsty all of the time and going to the bathroom a lot are both signs of diabetes. Other signs include blurry vision and feeling tired. A Dangerous Side Effect of Diabetes – When your body doe Continue reading >>

My 3 Hour Glucose Test Disaster

My 3 Hour Glucose Test Disaster

If you’re here, you likely searched for something like: failed glucose test failed 3-hour glucose test what happens when you fail your glucose test what to expect at my glucose screenings sugar shock glucose test throwing up after glucose test And so I say: welcome! (Although I hope that what happened to me doesn’t happen to you!) Since I originally shared this experience, I have gone on to have two healthy, beautiful baby girls (read their birth stories here and here). Despite the dramatic moments I had at the glucose test, please be assured that it’s very uncommon and I recovered after a little rest and relaxation! A quick update on my story. During my first pregnancy, I failed my 1-hour glucose test, which meant I was ordered to undergo a second and more extended test. These glucose screenings are designed to diagnose high blood sugar during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). The first test involves drinking a liquid that contains glucose and after an hour, having your blood drawn to test the sugars. If you fail the first test, you have to do a tolerance test, which involves fasting and then another round of glucose screening with multiple blood draws. So, that brings us back to my experience! I showed up to my 3-hour test armed with my laptop and free wifi to pass the time, so I wasn’t too worried. I fasted and showed up at 8:15am. At 8:30am I was taken back and had my fasting blood sugar level drawn. I was handed the glucola, which was twice as sweet as the previous one, meaning it had 100g of sugar in it. Again, it didn’t taste bad, just syrup-y sweet. This time, I had 10 minutes to drink it and I chatted with the nurse while I sipped away. She told me some interesting facts: How you eat doesn’t necessarily affect your outcome. She has had large women c Continue reading >>

Colds And Illness

Colds And Illness

When you are poorly with colds and illness or vomiting, you may notice a rise in blood sugar levels as your body fights to get better. The body releases extra glucose and having gestational diabetes means that you cannot create or use enough insulin to help normalise your blood sugar levels. Dehydration With higher blood sugar levels your body will cause more frequent urination to help flush out the excess glucose, this in turn can lead to dehydration. Make sure you increase fluid intake if you are poorly. How to make yourself feel better Drink plenty Try to eat little and often to maintain blood sugar levels Frequently test blood sugar levels so that you can see what's happening Take paracetamol to bring down temperatures and give pain relief Try sugar free throat lozenges for sore throats such as Halls sugar free throat sweets Try applying Vicks Vaporub on your neck for sore throats, or on the soles of your feet with colds Try drinking hot water, lemon and ginger for colds Have a warm, steamy shower or bath to clear airways For help with advice when vomiting, take a look at our hyperemesis page here. Consult a medical professional if you are concerned or symptoms persist. If you cannot keep food down then you should contact your hospital Diabetes and infections Bacteria feed from increased glucose levels and the reduced function of neutrophils (white blood cells that attack infection) in the body mean that diabetics are more susceptible to infection. Gestational diabetes also increases the susceptibility to various types of infections. The most common infections are urinary tract, yeast infections such as thrush and skin infections. If you suspect you may be suffering with any type of infection then please seek medical advice. In many cases, medication may be required Continue reading >>

'get Outside And Embrace The Cold:' Gestational Diabetes Linked To Warmer Temperatures

'get Outside And Embrace The Cold:' Gestational Diabetes Linked To Warmer Temperatures

Canadian researchers have uncovered a direct link between risk of gestational diabetes and what may at first seem like an unlikely source: outdoor air temperatures. In Monday's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, researchers report the relationship they found after checking records of nearly 400,000 pregnant women in the Greater Toronto Area who gave birth between 2002 and 2014. "This is the first population study showing this relationship between air temperature and gestational diabetes risk," said lead author Dr. Gillian Booth, a scientist at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Alicia Dubay's gestational diabetes illustrates the stakes for women at high risk of developing the condition. Left untreated, the temporary form of diabetes in pregnancy can result in stillbirth, increase the risk of having a difficult delivery and increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes for mom and baby. "I remember after I got my diagnosis, I called my husband crying really, really hard, because I was nervous and worried about it what it meant for me and for my baby," Dubay, 32, recalled. Women typically take a glucose drink test 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancy to see if their blood sugar levels are high. Dubay's baby girl, Seraphina Rose, was born healthy and full term at 37 weeks in December 2015. A short stay in the neonatal ICU to check that the infant was fine at regulating her blood sugars was the only effect related to the Brampton, Ont., mom's gestational diabetes. "There were a few things that were really challenging," Dubay said. "Just keeping on top of all the scheduling of everything that you need to do" to manage the condition while working full time. It included: Carefully planned and prepared meals and snacks. B Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

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