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Gestational Diabetes Symptoms

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (or gestational diabetes mellitus, GDM) is a condition in which females who previously were not having diabetes exhibit higher than normal levels of blood sugar while pregnant. The illness usually shows few signs/symptoms [1] . It is usually found during pregnancy medical checks. Up to 16% of pregnant women are affected by GDM[2]. Pregnant women with family history of having diabetes and ethnic background have higher chances of getting the disease. Gestational diabetes is caused when a pregnant woman's body does not produce enough insulin, leading to higher than normal blood sugar levels. Some women with GDM are treated with drugs. However, healthy eating [3]and regular exercise can help to lower the chances of getting GDM. It is still unclear what causes gestational diabetes. It may be due to the action of pregnancy hormones, blocking the action of insulin to its receptors. This prevents cells to take in glucose properly. This causes sugar to remain in blood, where it continues to rise. [4] Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes can have many problems, such as, being too large (which may make childbirth difficult), lower than normal blood glucose, or being born too early. More serious problems include brain problems or dead before birth.[5] In addition, women with gestational diabetes have higher risk of getting Type 2 diabetes (or, in fewer cases, Type 1 diabetes) after pregnancy. In most cases, children belonging to mothers having gestational diabetes are at higher risk of childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes later in life. This can be stopped through healthy eating and regular exercise. [6][7] Common risk factors for developing gestational diabetes are: Having gestational diabetes previously Mother's age- risk increases with age (espe Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, some women develop high blood sugar levels. This condition is known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). GDM typically develops between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s estimated to occur in up to 9.2 percent of pregnancies. If you develop GDM while you’re pregnant, it doesn’t mean that you had diabetes before your pregnancy or will have it afterward. But GDM does raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. If poorly managed, it can also raise your child’s risk of developing diabetes and add other risk factors to you and your baby during pregnancy and delivery. It’s rare for GDM to cause symptoms. If you do experience symptoms, they will likely be mild. They may include: fatigue blurred vision excessive thirst excessive need to urinate The exact cause of GDM is unknown, but hormones likely play a role. When you’re pregnant, your body produces larger amounts of some hormones, including: human placental lactogen estrogen hormones that increase insulin resistance These hormones affect your placenta and help sustain your pregnancy. Over time, the amount of these hormones in your body increases. They may interfere with the action of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar. Insulin helps move glucose out of your blood into cells, where it’s used for energy. If you don’t have enough insulin, or you have high levels of hormones that prevent insulin from working properly, your blood glucose levels may rise. This can cause GDM. You’re at higher risk of developing GDM if you: are over the age of 25 have high blood pressure have a family history of diabetes were overweight before you became pregnant have previously given birth to a baby weighin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

PDF Format Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes mellitus that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Some women found to have gestational diabetes actually may have had mild diabetes before pregnancy that was not diagnosed. What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") is a condition that causes high levels of glucose in the blood (see the FAQ Diabetes and Women). Glucose is a sugar that is the body’s main source of energy. Health problems can occur when glucose levels are too high. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by a change in the way a woman’s body responds to insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone. It moves glucose out of the blood and into the body’s cells where it can be turned into energy. During pregnancy, a woman’s cells naturally become slightly more resistant to insulin’s effects. This change is designed to increase the mother’s blood glucose level to make more nutrients available to the baby. The mother’s body makes more insulin to keep the blood glucose level normal. In a small number of women, even this increase is not enough to keep their blood glucose levels in the normal range. As a result, they develop gestational diabetes. Will I be tested for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes. You may be asked about your medical history and risk factors or you may have a blood test to measure the level of glucose in your blood. This test usually is done between 24 weeks and 28 weeks of pregnancy. It may be done earlier if you have risk factors. If I develop gestational diabetes, will I always have diabetes mellitus? For most women, gestational diabetes goes away after childbirth. How Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

Could you have gestational diabetes and not know it? Nearly 10% of pregnant women find out they have gestational diabetes midway through their pregnancies. Most of them are surprised by the news because they feel the same way that they’ve always felt: healthy and normal. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that affects only pregnant women. It shows up in women who’ve never had diabetes before. And for many (but not all) such women, it goes away on its own after their babies are born. You may never have signs of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women don’t. That’s why your doctor has to screen you for it, usually between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. The test checks your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels after a glucose load. Some pregnant women do notice subtle signs of gestational diabetes. The symptoms are similar to those of other forms of diabetes. But they’re also common symptoms in all pregnant women, so they’re easy to miss as the sign that something’s wrong. Signs of gestational diabetes include: Feeling thirsty. You may want to drink a lot more than you usually do. You’ll feel thirsty even when you haven’t eaten something salty, run around on a hot day, or done something else that would make you want an extra glass of water. Being tired. If you feel fatigued, even early in the day, it may be more than the strain of being pregnant that’s causing you to be so tired. Ask your doctor if you could be at risk for gestational diabetes. Having a dry mouth. A dry mouth may go hand-in-hand with your increased thirst. You may want to drink more water to get rid of the parched feeling. Both could be signs of gestational diabetes. All pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes, whether you show any symptoms or not. But you s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

About Gestational diabetes Pregnant women who were not diabetic before but who have high blood sugar levels during pregnancy are said to have gestational diabetes (GD). Normally, the disease affects women quite late in her pregnancy, around the 24th week. The disease does not show noticeable signs or symptoms. In some cases however, gestational diabetes may cause excessive thirst or increased urination. 32 million people are living with diabetes in India, and more than 16 percent of pregnant Indian women have gestational diabetes. And the prevalence percentage of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing rapidly. According to a study published in the Journal of the Association of Physicians of India, an overall prevalence of GDM in their study area is about 17% in Chennai, 15% in Trivandrum, 21% in Alwaye, 12% in Bangalore, 18.8% in Erode and 17.5% in Ludhiana. The study also indicated that Indian women have high prevalence of diabetes and their relative risk of developing GDM is 11.3 times compared to white women. Further, Asian women are ethnically more prone to develop glucose intolerance compared to other ethnic groups. It has also been seen that pregnant women in the age group of 30 to 39 years had greater prevalence of GDM as compared with those in the age group of 20 to 29 years. Considering all these facts, the researchers suggest screening all pregnant women for glucose intolerance. Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes

A A A Gestational Diabetes (cont.) During pregnancy, an organ called the placenta develops in the uterus. The placenta connects the mother and baby and makes sure the baby has enough food and water. It also makes several hormones. Some of these hormones make it hard for insulin to do its job—controlling blood sugar—so the mother's body has to make more insulin to keep sugar levels in a safe range. Gestational diabetes develops when the organ that makes insulin, the pancreas, cannot make enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels within a target range. Symptoms Because gestational diabetes does not cause symptoms, you need to be tested for the condition. This is usually done between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. You may be surprised if your test shows a high blood sugar level. It is important for you to be tested for gestational diabetes, because high blood sugar can cause problems for both you and your baby. Sometimes, a pregnant woman has been living with diabetes without knowing it. If you have symptoms from diabetes, they may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Increased hunger. Blurred vision. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel more hungry, so having these symptoms doesn't always mean that a woman has diabetes. Talk with your doctor if you have these symptoms so that you can be tested for diabetes. A A A Gestational Diabetes (cont.) What Happens Most women find out they have gestational diabetes after being tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of their pregnancy. After you know you have gestational diabetes, you will need to make certain changes in the way you eat and how often you exercise to help keep your blood sugar level within a target range. As you get farther along in your pregnancy, your body will continue Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which a woman without diabetes develops high blood sugar levels during pregnancy.[2] Gestational diabetes generally results in few symptoms;[2] however, it does increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, depression, and requiring a Caesarean section.[2] Babies born to mothers with poorly treated gestational diabetes are at increased risk of being too large, having low blood sugar after birth, and jaundice.[2] If untreated, it can also result in a stillbirth.[2] Long term, children are at higher risk of being overweight and developing type 2 diabetes.[2] Gestational diabetes is caused by not enough insulin in the setting of insulin resistance.[2] Risk factors include being overweight, previously having gestational diabetes, a family history of type 2 diabetes, and having polycystic ovarian syndrome.[2] Diagnosis is by blood tests.[2] For those at normal risk screening is recommended between 24 and 28 weeks gestation.[2][3] For those at high risk testing may occur at the first prenatal visit.[2] Prevention is by maintaining a healthy weight and exercising before pregnancy.[2] Gestational diabetes is a treated with a diabetic diet, exercise, and possibly insulin injections.[2] Most women are able to manage their blood sugar with a diet and exercise.[3] Blood sugar testing among those who are affected is often recommended four times a day.[3] Breastfeeding is recommended as soon as possible after birth.[2] Gestational diabetes affects 3–9% of pregnancies, depending on the population studied.[3] It is especially common during the last three months of pregnancy.[2] It affects 1% of those under the age of 20 and 13% of those over the age of 44.[3] A number of ethnic groups including Asians, American Indians, Indigenous Australians, and Pacific Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational diabetes -- diabetes that develops during pregnancy -- is a relatively common complication of pregnancy, affecting about 6% of all pregnant women. You may have a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are obese when you become pregnant Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large (greater than 9 pounds) baby before Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or suffering from certain birth defects Have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies Have a family history of diabetes Come from certain ethnic backgrounds, including African, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or Pacific Islander Are older than 30 But half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no risk factors. If left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for your newborn. For example, babies of untreated mothers with gestational diabetes may grow too large (called macrosomia), increasing the risk of problems during delivery, such as injuries to the baby's shoulders and arms and nerves in these areas. Having a very large baby may also increase your risk for requiring a cesarean section or other assistance during delivery (such as a forceps or vacuum delivery). Your baby may also experience a sudden drop in blood sugar after birth, requiring treatment with a sugar solution given through a needle in the vein. Your newborn baby may also have a higher risk of developing jaundice (a condition that causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and breathing problems. The risk of birth defects in infants whose mothers have gestational diabetes is very low because most pregnant women develop gestational diabetes after the 20th week of pregnancy, when the fetus has already fully developed. The risk of birt Continue reading >>

8 Silent Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

8 Silent Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Blurred vision iStock/gorraj Gestational diabetes, which occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar, is actually difficult to diagnose through symptoms alone because it mimics typical pregnancy complaints. This is why in 2014, the U.S. Preventative Task Force recommended gestational diabetes screening for all pregnant women after 24 weeks, a test in which you drink a sweet liquid to see how your body handles the sugar. But there are some signs that, if you experience them together, should prompt a call to your doctor. One such symptom is blurred vision. “When blood glucose is high, the water content of the eye structures is affected, making it harder to focus,” says Clara Ward, MD, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth and Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston. “It can be a chronic vision problem if the sugars are always high, or sudden and transient after a very indulgent meal.” Once your blood sugar is under control, your vision should go back to normal. iStock/Alliance It’s totally normal to be tired during pregnancy due to hormonal changes—according to a poll by the National Sleep Foundation, 78 percent of women had more disturbed sleep during pregnancy, and up to 60 percent took naps. But excessive fatigue can also be one symptom of gestational diabetes. “When sugars are high, your cells and organs can’t get and use the oxygen and nutrients they need to produce energy,” Dr. Ward says. “Fatigue is the body’s way of trying to get us to rest.” Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It's different from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Like other forms of diabetes, it causes high levels of glucose (a simple sugar) in the blood. Gestational diabetes develops when various pregnancy hormones and body changes — including weight gain — cause cells to use insulin (a hormone that regulates blood glucose) less efficiently. As many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes, according to a 2014 report in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. Symptoms of Gestational Diabetes For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause any noticeable signs or symptoms. If you do experience symptoms (which are caused by high blood glucose levels), they may include: Blurred vision Fatigue Excessive thirst and urination Nausea and vomiting not associated with normal pregnancy Weight loss Increased rate of infections, particularly in the urinary tract (bladder), vagina, and skin These symptoms tend to go away after giving birth, when blood glucose levels return to normal. Gestational Diabetes Complications Uncontrolled gestational diabetes can cause a number of complications in both pregnant women and their babies. It can raise your risk of developing preeclampsia, a potentially deadly condition during pregnancy that involves high blood pressure, too much protein in the urine, swelling, and depression. You may require a Cesarean section (C-section) because your baby is considerably larger than normal, a condition known as macrosomia. And if your blood glucose levels aren't tightly controlled during pregnancy, your baby will have an increased risk of dying before or soon after birth, and may be born with: Temporary hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) Jaundice ( Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes: Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Pregnancy

The increase of particular hormones during pregnancy can prevent insulin – a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels – from working properly, resulting in a form of diabetes called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is temporary and affects about 4% of all pregnant women. But, even though gestational diabetes is temporary, it still poses some risks: Both you and your baby have a greater chance of developing type-2 diabetes, which could lead to organ and blood vessel damage if not properly treated. Half of all women who have gestational diabetes contract type-2 diabetes within 10-20 years of delivery. Babies whose mothers have diabetes are usually much larger than the average baby (a condition called macrosomia) because they receive extra glucose through the placenta that is then stored as fat. This may result in birth complications and the need for a cesarean section. Babies born to mothers with diabetes are also more likely to have hypoglycemia, breathing problems, and jaundice at birth, as well as an increased risk for childhood obesity. Having a family history of diabetes isn’t the only thing that increases your chances of developing gestational diabetes; in fact, there are a number of contributing factors, including age and ethnicity. Here are some components that affect your risk level: You’re overweight or obese You’re over 30 years of age You had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy You have a family history of type-2 diabetes You’re Native American, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Indian, Polynesian, Melanesian Vietnamese or an indigenous Australian or Torres Strait Islander The first signs of gestational diabetes are often missed because they are some of the most common symptoms of pregnancy. A glucose screening test, given to women who Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which levels of glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream are higher than normal. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy, usually in the second trimester. Glucose is produced in the body from the foods you eat. The pancreas, an organ located just behind the stomach, produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes the glucose from the bloodstream and carries it inside your body’s cells where it is used for energy, as well as allowing excess glucose to be stored properly. During pregnancy, the placenta produces hormones that help the baby develop. These hormones also block the effects of insulin in the woman’s body, increasing her blood sugar levels. Most women who have gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Who is at risk? Gestational diabetes affects about 4–8 of every 100 pregnant women in the United States. Any pregnant woman can develop the condition, but some women are at greater risk than others. Known risk factors include: Age (older than 25 years; the risk is even greater after age 35) Race (occurs more often in African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asian Americans) Overweight and obesity Personal history of gestational diabetes or prediabetes Having delivered a baby weighing more than 9 pounds Family history of type 2 diabetes (in parents or siblings) Among women with these risk factors, as many as 14 in 100 develop gestational diabetes. How do you know if you have gestational diabetes? Most women with gestational diabetes have no warning signs or symptoms, so all pregnant women should be tested for this condition between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. For minority women who are obese and who have had a previous history of gestational diabetes or a Continue reading >>

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