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Gestational Diabetes Sweet Treats

Can You Eat Chocolate With Gestational Diabetes?

Can You Eat Chocolate With Gestational Diabetes?

Chocolate is a sweet treat that has added refined sugar and so many ladies may prefer not to push the boundaries and choose not to eat chocolate with gestational diabetes. Too much, or the wrong kind of chocolate can easily spike blood sugar levels too high. However, for many it is an extremely hard thing to avoid and a small amount of the right kind of chocolate, paired well can be a safer small sweet treat that keeps blood sugar levels at safe levels. Due to the fat in chocolate it means the glucose from it releases slower than some other sweets and sugary treats and it is for this reason that chocolate is no longer recommended to be used to raise blood sugar levels when insulin dependant diabetics are having hypos. If you are a chocoholic who feels they will not be able to control the amounts eaten, then you may want to make the choice to abstain completely, or only buy chocolate in treat size amounts to prevent overindulging. Chocolate can be eaten as a treat with gestational diabetes but here are a few tips to make it more tolerable: Control of levels - Only have chocolate treats if you have control of your blood sugar levels. If you are seeing erratic levels (high and/or low), then leave treats until you have gained better control first. Snack - Eat it as a 'snack', rather than straight after a meal so that you don't over eat too many carbohydrates at one time OR if eating straight after a meal bear this additional carb amount in mind! Quantity - Eat only small amounts of chocolate. If you struggle to be restrained with eating chocolate then purchase treat size individual bars so that you don't overindulge e.g. a Cadbury's Freddo which is 18g in weight and 10g total carbs, or the Green & Black's 35g 70% dark chocolate minature bars, or treat size chocolate buttons Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Sweets You Can Have

Gestational Diabetes: Sweets You Can Have

Having gestational diabetes during your pregnancy is not a fun thing! You already have all the worries of a pregnancy and stressing out about getting things ready for the baby, now you have to deal with this too? If you have gestional diabetes, I want to share my story with you as well as giving you some tips on how to sneak in some good sweets without breaking the rules! When I was pregnant with my second baby, I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at about 28 weeks. I was not happy when this day came because it was the start of three months of watching your health very closely. Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy in a person who did not have diabetes before pregnancy. The pancreas does not produce enough insulin to combat the glucose in your body. You can ask your doctor about the science behind it, I just want to share what I had to go through and let you know what to look out for. For the next three months, everyday, I had to test myself on what my blood sugar levels were 7 times a day: before and after each meal and before bedtime snack. Yes, I had to prick my finger and draw blood 7 times a day. On top of that, I had to get checked every two weeks from the gestional diabetes clinic. I had to record all my blood sugar levels, what insulin I had taken, and record all the food I ate, six times a day. My days seem to be a drag and I was not enjoying myself! The only way I can feel any remote happiness in this process was finding out what sweets I can have. SWEET foods like ice cream, chocolate, and desserts! I was craving sweets like crazy, like with both pregnancies but this one was worse since I wasn’t allowed to have any sweets. During one of my clinic visits, I asked the dietitian what I can do about my cravings for chocol Continue reading >>

10 Savvy Snacks For The Gestational Diabetes Diet

10 Savvy Snacks For The Gestational Diabetes Diet

If you’ve got gestational diabetes, you can still get the nutrients you and Baby need and keep your blood glucose levels under control. Enjoy these 10 healthy, diabetic-friendly snacks during pregnancy. 1. Nachos Who says diabetic snacks mean zero taste? These zesty nachos are tantalizing to the taste buds, provide approximately 29 grams of carbohydrates, and are a good way to work in a little calcium and a serving of vegetables into your prenatal diet. Here’s how to make them: Layer 10 corn tortilla chips—just over 1 ounce in weight—on a baking sheet and top with 1/4 cup of grated cheddar cheese and 1/4 cup of chopped green pepper (or use hot peppers, if preferred). Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit, or until cheese is melted and bubbly. Remove from oven and transfer to plate. Top with 1/4 cup of tomato salsa and a tablespoon dollop of low-fat Greek-style yogurt. Health Tip: Because flavored tortilla chips tend to contain lots of sodium and, even worse for moms with gestational diabetes, added sugar, stick to plain corn tortilla chips. 2. Cheese and Crackers Perfect for a healthy, carb-controlled snack break at home or work—and easy enough to pack up for eating on the go—change up your choice of fruit and cheese to keep this snack classic fresh and exciting. These options are paired with a cup of low-fat milk for added calcium and just enough carbohydrates to reach 30 grams: 10 whole grain baked “thin snack crackers” (approx. 8 g of carbs); 1 ounce of cheddar cheese, sliced; 1/2 medium apple, sliced (10 g) and 1 cup of low-fat milk (12 g) 4 pieces of whole grain melba toast (15 g of carbs); 1 tablespoon reduced-fat cream cheese (1 g); 1/4 cup sliced strawberries (3 g) and 1 cup of low-fat milk (12 g) 5 round whole grain crackers (10 g of car Continue reading >>

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

You might think a diabetes diagnosis means you’ll have to skip dessert forever. “Not so,” says Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, a certified diabetes educator at DuPage Medical Center in Chicago. “With a little planning, you can satisfy your sweet tooth while keeping your blood sugar under control.” But just how do you do that? There are several ways. Swap Other Carbs for Dessert “Everyone focuses on the sugar, but what’s really important is the total carbohydrates,” says Rondinelli-Hamilton, author of the American Diabetes Association cookbook Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking. “If you’d like to have a small piece of pie for dessert, skip the starchy vegetable during dinner,” she says. But she’s quick to point out that this isn’t something you should do on a regular basis. “Desserts and sweets don’t have the nutritional value that other foods do, so it’s best to save them for special occasions,” she says. Think Small Along with limiting how often you have dessert, you’ll also need to limit how much you eat -- and that can be a challenge. “Sugar sets off fireworks in your brain, making you crave more,” says Jessica Bennett, RD, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Fighting the urge to overdo it takes a lot of effort. But there are ways to make it a little easier. “Set yourself up for success by buying desserts that are packaged as a single serving, like a sugar-free fudge pop or a small square of dark chocolate,” Rondinelli-Hamilton says. And be realistic. “If you can’t have cake in the house without eating the whole thing, don’t buy a cake,” she says. When you go out, check the menu for miniature desserts. Many restaurants now offer treats served in small dishes or shot glasses. “If that’s not Continue reading >>

Sweet Snacks/dessert

Sweet Snacks/dessert

Is anyone allowing themselves to indulge in a sweet snack or dessert? Does anyone have any good recommendations that don't cause a spike in BG? I have been craving dessert for the last few weeks after sticking to a very strict diet. Any tips welcome! I had a salad for lunch Friday and a small slice of pumpkin cheesecake and walked 1 mile in the morning before lunch and my #s were 113 2 hours after. I just make sure whoever desserts I eat I have that much protein to balance. So a cookie that's 12 grams of carbs I have at least 12 grams of protein (nuts, peanut butter, etc). I've been having pretty good luck. I'm diet controlled for all #'s except fasting I'm on meds for (but still struggling with it). One sweet snack I've been making myself is just blending together 12 oz unsweetened vanilla almond milk, 1/2 a banana, and 3 Tbs no sugar added peanut butter. It tastes like a sweet smoothie but has no added sugar and counts for 1 carb! I usually pair it with a couple cheese sticks for additional protein, even though the peanut butter alone is probably enough. :) Cheesecake is one of the better desserts to have because of the protein it has. Try sugar free jello or pudding as well. And weight watchers ice Creams. I opt for bites of things a little more often as opposed to doing a full dessert on rare occasions. As long as it's with dinner, doesn't seem to matter if it's 2 bites of cheesecake or half a See's candy truffle or a generous spoonful of ice cream. My numbers stay low and I've been surprised that it's enough to satisfy the sweet tooth. I had some chocolate carmel ice cream this afternoon after eating a big spoonful of peanut butter. I tested after an hour and my number was only a 92. You never know until you try! I toast raisin cinnamon English muffins and put but Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

This post contains affiliate links. This means that I make a small commission off of purchases made through my links at no extra charge to you. All opinions are my own. When I was pregnant with Bensen, my biggest struggle came when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Some women cry when their regular clothes don't fit anymore, I cried when my carb intake became drastically limited and I realized just how many high carb foods I enjoy. I knew going into that pregnancy that I was at risk for GD because I was pre-diabetic, a little overweight and have a family history of Type II diabetes, but getting that confirmation that I indeed had it was rough for me. I'm here to tell you that I survived and that six weeks postpartum, I was healthier than I'd been when I first got pregnant! My diagnosis came the week of Valentine's Day, so my loving husband changed his plans for our celebration. Instead of going to our favorite pasta restaurant, stuffing ourselves silly, and then coming home to lounge on the couch in front of a movie, he planned and prepared a low carb dinner at home and then we went for a walk. It meant a lot to me because I knew how much time and effort he'd put into researching and preparing our meal, and also how much of a sacrifice it was for him to eat the same thing that I was eating and nothing more. He told me later that he was hungry within a couple of hours because the meal just wasn't filling enough for him. During those last two months of my pregnancy, I learned to love vegetables and eat foods that I never would have considered in the past. After a few weeks of testing my blood sugar levels before and after each meal, I learned what I needed to eat and do to keep them level throughout the day. Some days were better than others, but I was diligent a Continue reading >>

Easy No-bake Diabetic Dessert Recipes

Easy No-bake Diabetic Dessert Recipes

No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! Continue reading >>

Dessert Archives - Katie Knapkekatie Knapke

Dessert Archives - Katie Knapkekatie Knapke

An all natural, sweet treat that wont send you blood sugar through the roof So you are female, hormonal, pregnant and lets face it at some point you will to be craving a gooey, sweet, chocolate chip cookie. You will feel guilty about it. You will try to eat a piece of fruit to suppress the craving. It wont work. You will anguish on whether or not to give in. You will give in and have just one chocolate chip cookie (20-40 grams of carbs) and you will worry that your little meter is going to give you an outrageously high number so. you walk for an hour after eating the little piece of heaven. Sound familiar? Flourless Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars made with Chickpeas, Peanut Butter and Honey Perfect after dinner treat if you have gestational diabetes Gooey and Delicious Satisfy a sweet tooth! I am pretty sure some of you are ready to take a cookie and shove it down my throat right now but I found a little slice of heaven with only 13 grams of carbs and to go along with it 2 grams of fiber and 3.6 grams of protein! Perfectfor an after dinner dessert! Yes it is a treat, but one that is so delicious, reasonably low in carbs and it will more than satisfy the chocolate chip cookie craving! As my pledge, there are no artificial sweeteners in this or any of my recipes! You: Ummm, Katie, I looked at the ingredients and there a can of chickpeas listed first sounds gross Me: Trust me on this one they are absolutely delicious and have been approved my husband and kids. My 3 year old even did a cookie dance:) I wish I had it on video! RECIPE: Salted Flourless Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars Continue reading >>

9 Chocolate Recipes For People With Gestational Diabetes Because Youve Still Got A Sweet Tooth

9 Chocolate Recipes For People With Gestational Diabetes Because Youve Still Got A Sweet Tooth

9 Chocolate Recipes for People With Gestational Diabetes Because Youve Still Got a Sweet Tooth The one thing I dreaded more than anything while I was pregnant was the test for gestational diabetes . Since my chocolate craving was strong, I prayed I could continue plowing through bags of M&Ms. Luckily, I passed, but I knew several women who werent so lucky. According to the UCSF Medical Center, seven percent of pregnant women suffer from gestational diabetes , which usually goes away once your baby is born. But until then, you have to come up with clever way to satisfy your sweet tooth, which means finding chocolate recipes for people with gestational diabetes . I know what youre probably thinking. How can a sugar-free chocolate recipe have any sort of flavor? But it is 100 percent possible. After all, the 29.9 million Americans suffering from diabetes do it every day. By changing a few key ingredients, like almond flour instead of white flour and using superfoods, like avocados, to create desserts, you can find some new favorites to enjoy. Sure they may be a little healthier than the traditional chocolate cake youre used to. But isnt that just better for you and your growing baby. Even if youre in the clear to eat chocolate, you should try whipping up one of these nine gestational diabetes-friendly chocolate recipes. Theyre sure to satisfy anyones craving pregnant, diabetic, or none of the above. 1. Healthy Vegan Chocolate Avocado Mousse Made with the superfood avocado, this vegan chocolate avocado mousse from Hello Natural is full of antioxidants and only two tablespoons of cocoa. Youll be able to enjoy a creamy, healthy pudding without sacrificing flavor. 2. Low Sugar Chocolate Chip Quinoa Cookies This low sugar treat from Oatmeal With a Fork is made with quinoa, a g Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes Yesterday just got my results back from my GTT and I've just reached the threshold of 7.8 which means I've officially got gestational diabetes. I was fine in the appointment with my midwife but as soon as I got out I just burst into tears. It's the first complication I've had with this pregnancy. I've got to wait to have an appointment with the diabetes team at the hospital to get it all explained to me properly about how I can change my diet etc. Getting home, I looked through the foods we have in and with the GDA of sugar being 90g, the amount of sugar in everything is atrocious. A yogurt I have contains nearly 30g of sugar! Feels like I won't be able to eat anything! I have such a sweet tooth and am gutted to think I can't eat biscuits or chocolate. I'm not into savoury snacks at all! If anyone has experience of gestational diabetes and how they manage with it that would be great! Try not to worry too much hon, most GD is managed by diet and it just means they like to observe the baby a little closer. Did you have any symptoms of GD before you took the GTT? I have been eating low GI for a while now and have found oat cakes with Philidelphia on and brown toast with low sugar jam on a really nice snack/treat. x x Sorry to hear about your GD, but it's good that it has been picked up on and you and baby will be looked after. I do totally sympathize with you about how changing your diet will be tough. When they thought I might have it (had the test and I don't thankfully) I was so depressed! Had a really niggley pregnancy-lots of annoying symptoms that meant I haven't really enjoyed it if I'm honest, and when I thought I'd have to give up cake... It was the last straw and i was in floods of tears. But there are so many low su Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And A Horrible Sweet Tooth!

Gestational Diabetes And A Horrible Sweet Tooth!

I don't have GD but I'm trying to eat by the rules of 100 Days of Real Food as much as possible and one of the core concepts is eliminating refined sugars and artificial sweeteners (which are NOT good for you) from the diet. It takes a bit of changing the way you view food, but I realized that buying whole foods (as in, foods that exist naturally) and shopping at places like Trader Joe's makes it a lot easier. You just start by stocking up on whole foods, and/or foods for which the ingredients list does not include sugar, and then augment with different naturally-occurring sweeteners like honey and pure maple syrup. For instance, instead of buying Frosted Mini Wheats I bought a box of organic wheat squares (ingredients: 100% whole wheat) and started mixing pure honey into it. Pretty freaking tasty, actually. The recipe index for the site is here . It includes a lot of desserts and other snack-type noms. You should check it out, it could be a great source of alternative foods while you cope with GD. You "plan" them into your meals/snacks. A few nights ago, I had 1/2 serving of a chocolate candy bar broken into chunks and mixed with pb so I could have a carb and a protein together. Another thing I have done is cut back on potatoes so that I could have some apple with my supper. In the 2-2.5 weeks since I got the GD diagnosis, I have also noticed that cutting down on the candy/cooky type junk sweets is causing fruits and less sweeter items (i.e. plain greek yogurt with 1/2 sugar jelly) to be satisfying to my sweet tooth. I use sugar-free popsicles and jello for "free snacks". When I get a carb choice snack, I am allowed 15 carbs so 100 calorie packs are good choices or the 100 calorie Choboni Greek Yogurts have been pretty tasty. I was told no honey or pure maple sugar, o Continue reading >>

Sweet Treats For Gestational Diabetes

Sweet Treats For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes might mean lots of treats are off the table for you so it is time to get creative. Here are two recipes for sugar-free treats that are delicious as well as good for you and your pregnancy. These tasty muffins make great use of apples which are in season right now. There is no refined sugar in the recipe and it contains the right carbohydrates that are broken down slowly, such as oat bran and sultanas. 2. Sift flour and baking powder into a large bowl. Mix in oat bran, cinnamon, salt and sultanas. 3. In a separate bowl whisk egg, milk and grapeseed oil together. 4. Make a well in the dry ingredients and add the egg mixture and beat. 5. Stir in grated apples and chopped walnuts. 6. Grease a muffin pan and spoon mixture evenly into the cups. 7. Bake in pre-heated oven for 20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Likewise, this yummy recipe contains no refined sugar. Instead there is bananas, orange juice and sultanas for your slow releasing carbohydrates. Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

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