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Gestational Diabetes Sugar Binge

Confessions Of Sweetaholic-my Marshmallow Binge

Confessions Of Sweetaholic-my Marshmallow Binge

Confessions of Sweetaholic-My Marshmallow Binge New Member Recently diagnosed type 1 and giving myself shots Confessions of Sweetaholic-My Marshmallow Binge I am a new Diabetic. New Type 1. Almost one month new. Just started taking insulin last week. I have an ENORMOUS sweet tooth. Ever since I found out I have diabetes, I have been so good. I have been eating sugar free jello, sugar free pudding, or a spoon full of peanut butter to curb my cravings. Two nights ago while my boyfriend was in the shower I literally attacked a bag of marshmallows. There was half a bag left and I scarfed the entire bag down in 30 seconds. Flat. Of course I didnt tell him. At first I thought I was so sly for sneaking it. I later felt like I had cheated myself in so many ways. Shame. I gave in. Last night I "confessed" to him what I had done, knowing he would be so disappointed(which he was). I wanted to see if anyone has moments like these? I feel like a dog with my tail between my legs. I am so much stronger than this, and I have to be in order to manage my diabetes. Any tricks from my fellow "experienced" diabetics? I am going to have to get my sweet tooth under control and need help! I think many of us are former carbaholics. I can pass up a marshmallow, but chips are my downfall. I've been doing some form of low carb for almost 3 years. The only thing that has really helped me is eliminating certain carbs from my diet. The more I eat the more I want. I am now learning how to cook with alternates to flour and sugar so I can still have my treats around to safetly eat. Even though I have given up breads and most grains, the smell of fresh bread from a bakery sends me up the wall. It takes a lot of will power. Now when I crave those things, I think how high my bg will go and instead grab so Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Intake Affect Fetal Weight Gain In The Third Trimester?

Does Sugar Intake Affect Fetal Weight Gain In The Third Trimester?

Does Sugar Intake Affect Fetal Weight Gain in the Third Trimester? Nadia Haris is a registered radiation therapist who has been writing about nutrition for more than six years. She is completing her Master of Science in nutrition with a focus on the dietary needs of oncology patients. Eating too much sugar can cause fetal weight gain.Photo Credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz/iStock/Getty Images Nutrition before, during and after pregnancy impacts your baby's health. It is essential for pregnant women to eat a balanced diet that supplies their developing fetus and changing body with the right nutritional support. Eating too many carbohydrates and sugary foods can cause health problems and lead to excessive weight gain in the baby. Pregnancy is divided into three main stages, or trimesters. The third and last trimester is a critical time for growth, as the developing fetus will gain almost half its weight in this three-month period, and there is essential brain and lung formation. The food you eat directly impacts the baby's weight, and proper, balanced nutrition is of primary importance for your health and that of your baby. The American Pregnancy Association recommends gaining a pound per week during the seventh and eighth months of pregnancy. Your weight may stabilize or even decrease slightly in the ninth month. However, eating too many refined carbohydrates and sugary foods can negatively impact your baby's health and your own. In April 2002, "The Journal of Reproductive Medicine" published the results of research that studied the impact of gestational diabetes mellitus on pregnant women and the developing fetus. Excess sugar in the mother's blood due to consuming too many carbohydrates and sugary foods or because of uncontrolled type 2 or gestational diabetes can impact Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

Stop The Diabetic Binge

Stop The Diabetic Binge

Trying to stop a diabetic binge is like trying to keep your hand on a hot stove—it’s very difficult and against your natural instinct. Our body’s natural instinct is to withdraw the hand when we feel the heat; your body’s natural instinct when your blood sugar is low is to eat. Therefore, if your blood sugars remain low even after you eat the brain gets hijacked. As discussed in my previous blog “The Diabetic Binge.” Even when you know you have counteracted the hypoglycemic reaction (with food, a glucose tablet, or juice, for example), it is difficult to make yourself stop eating—because your brain is still receiving that “hungry” message. Your body and brain remain on high alert in an effort to raise those blood glucose levels, pushing you to eat in the same way that the brain tells the hand to pull away from the hot stove. Diabetic Binge Prevention The first way to reduce diabetic binging and the quantity of hypoglycemic reactions is to maintain well-controlled blood glucose levels. The more your blood glucose levels fluctuate, the greater the impact reactions will have on the body’s natural process to keep it fueled—and the higher the risk of hypoglycemia. To prevent binge eating during a hypoglycemic reaction, you should realize what a difficult task this is and that willpower will be a major part of the equation. There will most likely be times that one will end up binging despite having a strong will. The Plan… You need to have a plan for when it occurs. First take care of your reaction as you normally would. I suggest orange juice; drinking the quantity your body normally needs to get back to a normal blood glucose level. If you feel yourself wanting to eat more, then have a low carbohydrate snack that you can follow-up with and eat slowly Continue reading >>

Eating Too Much Sugar - Pregnancy-info

Eating Too Much Sugar - Pregnancy-info

I'm afraid I'm eating too much sugar. I have a weakness for chocolate candy, plus from what I've been reading, a lot of normal food I may be eating may contain added sugars as well. Can eating too much sugar harm my baby? I can't stop eating sugar either. I don't know if it's because I used to be on the Zone and hardly ate sugar, but now I crave it every afternoon. I don't think it will harm the baby per se, but it'll make us fat.. I am 20 weeks and already up 15 lbs! yes eating to much sugar can harm you baby you can have a very large baby and that can cause problems please talk to your doctor about the risks I do not want to scare you or anything but I have had gestational diebetes in all 3 of my pregnancy's so I have done research on this subject and it could lead to what I have as well good luck Have a piece of candy everyday, little piece to curb your craving so that you dont binge! And that little bit wont hurt! My mom had gestational diabetes with me because she ate a bunch of candy on Valetine's Day. If she could eat a lot of candy on one day & it affect the pregnancy, eating it a lot every day could be pretty bad. There are other sweet things that are good for you & baby to eat instead. for all the ladies: Jo's right. Lots of food we eat has added sugars, one of the worst of them being "high fructose corn syrup". It's in juices & cereal & yogurts & the list goes on. The main problem with people ingesting too much sugar is not that they WANT to, but that they are so concerned with checking the fat & calorie & carb content of what they're eating, they don't see the most important thing: the INGREDIENT list. So many of us are ingesting artificial this & that, tons of sugar & salt & partially hydrogenated oils, & nasty food coloring without knowing it! I've learne Continue reading >>

12 Tips For Coping With Gestational Diabetes

12 Tips For Coping With Gestational Diabetes

My first pregnancy was pretty smooth sailing until the seventh month when I learned I had Gestational Diabetes. Common among Hispanics and women over 35, Gestational Diabetes (GD) is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy, especially during third trimester. Although doctors aren’t sure why, women who are black, Hispanic, American Indian or Asian have an increased risk for developing gestational diabetes. In my case, I had eaten pretty healthy (I certainly wasn’t binging on sweets or desserts) and with medical counseling I learned my diagnosis was most likely hormonally based, meaning my placental hormones caused a rise in blood sugar not mater what I ate. For those of you diagnosed with GD, I’m not going to lie…it’s not a walk in the park, but it is manageable and the diagnosis forces you to be healthy during pregnancy (and not gain a ton of weight). Here are some things that helped me cope with GD and deliver a healthy baby in spite of having it (be sure to check with your doctor before you implement anything new into your GD self-care routine): 1. Seek a second opinion. Although I love my ob-gyn, I also saw an Endocrinologist at Northwestern who specializes in Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes. I did this for my second pregnancy and I would highly recommend it. I wish had done so for my first pregnancy. 2. Develop strategies to cope with GD “pain points.” The mandatory 2 hour fasting between meals was killer. Take a nap during those two-hour fasting windows if you can or keep yourself busy to make the time go by quickly. The fasting is what truly bothered me (and the continuous finger pricking). I only gained 25 pounds with my second pregnancy so being on the GD diet for nine month Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Binge Eating

Gestational Diabetes And Binge Eating

I'm really ashamed to admit this, but I've been having an increasingly difficult time with managing my Gestational Diabetes these last few weeks. I started off really well at 28 weeks and based on my numbers I was told that I just needed to continue with diet control and no insulin was necessary. After getting an ultrasound or two with an ''Everything looks ok!'' I slid back into old habits and have begun binge eating. I'm scared and horrified at what my blood sugar might look like, so sometimes I don't even test. Today I binged for like 45 mins, and when I checked my blood sugar around an hour after I had started my binge it said 156. I'm embarrassed and ashamed and I don't know what to do.. I had my last ultrasound yesterday. They said my baby is in the 75% percentile for tummy size which is to expected with GD, but her overall weight is in the 55% percentile (She's 7.5lbs at 39 weeks) and that everything looks fine. I was too scared to tell them about my recent issues with binge eating and so I said nothing. I could just cry right now because I hate myself so much. I had told my regular doctor months ago that I previously had an issue with binge eating and she said I could take a low dose of zoloft during pregnancy which might help. I had filled the prescription but I'm scared to take it thinking that will do more harm then the binge eating itself. And then if I want to breastfeed I'm afraid of taking it then too because I see so much conflicting info on the internet. I'm just so depressed and I don't know what to do... Continue reading >>

I Am A Bad Mom Already

I Am A Bad Mom Already

My eating disorder is more important than eating a low carb diet. And I really hate that I basically cannot eat fruit or milk because I love actual carbs more. This is leaving me constantly crying, super stressed out, and with crappy sleep. So of course, I haven't had a single fasting glucose under 90. All of my readings have been under 130, which means some after meals numbers have been a little high. I just want to binge. I keep rationalizing that other than higher birth weight, what the hell is eating poorly actually do to my baby. Because she already has an obese mother she has a higher risk of type 2 diabetes anyway. Higher birth rate could mean your baby could break a shoulder during delivery. You don't want to be responsible for that, or for your baby actually having diabetes. You need to stop thinking about yourself and put your baby's health before your taste buds. You sound selfish saying she'll be likely to have it anyways because you're obese. She could be the complete opposite. You being obese could make her a health freak. You never know. Don't set her up for failure, because you will always be upset with yourself. Either way, as hard as it is you've got to try and put your baby's health first. This diet is the hardest part of my pregnancy, but I keep telling myself it's not about me as much as it is my baby. You do the diet for your baby not for you. This little bundle of joy needs your help. Find a serious medical website and read about the consequences of untreated GD, it is not just diabetes later in life; it should convince you to act more seriously. I am pretty sure you want an healthy baby. Something I don't understand is the low carbs diet. GD mothers usually eat a huge amount of carbs. I usually eat healthy and have a healthy lifestylr and I neve Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes – 3 Common Diet Mistakes

Gestational Diabetes – 3 Common Diet Mistakes

Today’s guest post “Gestational Diabetes – 3 Common Diet Mistakes” is written by registered dietitian and gestational diabetes expert Lily Nichols. When the doctor said “You have gestational diabetes,” you practically broke down. You thought it couldn’t happen to you and now you’re completely overwhelmed trying to figure out how to manage it. Maybe you were given a glucose meter to check your blood sugar and you’re afraid of poking your finger. Maybe you were told your baby will come out big if you don’t change your diet. Most of all, you’re terrified that you might need insulin. For some women, changing their diet and exercise is all that’s needed to lower blood sugar. Actually, diet and exercise are the primary treatments for gestational diabetes. That means there is a chance you won’t need medicine or insulin. Only your medical provider can make that call. As a perinatal dietitian and diabetes educator for women with gestational diabetes, I’ve heard all of these concerns and more. The women in our OB/GYN office are lucky, because they get a full hour-long class with me to learn the ins and outs of eating to manage gestational diabetes. Plus, I continue to see them throughout their pregnancy, because what worked at 24 weeks might not work at week 36. Those first few days (or weeks) after diagnosis and before they see me are rough. Most ladies end up starving themselves in an attempt to control their blood sugar because they don’t know any other way. Luckily, there’s another way. Here are the 3 most common diet mistakes women make before they come to my gestational diabetes class: Mistake #1 – Eating Low Fat We’ve been told for so long that “fat will make us fat” or “low fat diets are healthy,” so it seems like reducing fat i Continue reading >>

Binge Eating And Pregnancy

Binge Eating And Pregnancy

If you're a woman with binge eating disorder and you're pregnant, you might need extra support to help you and your baby stay healthy. A good first step toward a successful pregnancy is to learn how bingeing affects your body and your unborn child. Trying to get pregnant ? You'll want to read this, too. Many women eat more food than usual when theyre pregnant. This is normal. But regularly eating a lot of food when youre not hungry , and sometimes to the point of feeling sick, is not. Youre dealing with more than simple pregnancy cravings if you: Often eat in secret because of feelings of shame or guilt Binge eating can make your periods come less often or even stop. When this happens, your body doesn't release an egg (ovulate) when it should each month. This can make it hard to get pregnant . Your urge to binge eat might go away during pregnancy. It does for a few women. But studies say the patterns of overeating often continue. Many women get the disorder for the first time during pregnancy. Many people who binge eat are overweight or obese. Carrying extra fat around your middle might make it hard for your doctor to track your babys growth and development with ultrasound . If you're overweight , you're also more likely to have certain problems during pregnancy, including: Set up extra appointments to keep track of your babys growth. Consider counseling and therapy (an important part of binge eating treatment ). Go to a support group for people with eating disorders . Your doctor might also want to check you for signs of depression after the baby is born ( postpartum depression ). Depression is common in people who binge eat, and its also common in new moms. Talk to your doctor about your eating habits, mood, and pregnancy symptoms . That can help you and your baby ca Continue reading >>

Falling Off The Wagon

Falling Off The Wagon

Life happens and pregnancy hormones causing all sorts of emotions do not help. Add gestational diabetes diagnosis to the mix along with any other number of problems that could be going on and some ladies find themselves seeking comfort from eating or drinking certain things, resulting in a binge. Life will throw curve balls at us all the time, so the best thing to do is be prepared. If you rely on food for comfort then work out what things you can eat as a stress relief treat which will not spike your blood sugar levels. OR, even better, find alternative means of stress relief... Take a candle lit bath, let your partner give you a massage (or book a professional one if your partner is causing the stress!), go for a walk along the sea front or out in the country. Take some time out for you! Gestational diagnosis can make some ladies live on salad leaves and 'dust' every day. If you over restrict yourself then you can quickly feel deprived and depressed and it is only a matter of time before you crack. Check out our dietary advice which can be found here . It's based on eating little and often. As long as you follow the 8 golden rules then you should be able to eat a wide variety of foods and we can help you find alternatives to most things you are craving. You may find our dietary advice is not as restrictive as the advice you've been given at hospital and it could make a huge difference to the readings you get. Don't know the alternatives and bored of what you're eating? It's very easy to keep eating the same things over and over as they give good readings. But there will come a time when you get to the point of wanting to vomit when you put that same item of food you've been living on for weeks to your mouth. This could be the breaking point where ladies throw caution Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Instability & Gestational Diabetes

Blood Sugar Instability & Gestational Diabetes

Blood Sugar Instability & Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Instability & Gestational Diabetes What are the benefits of maintaining stable blood sugar levels? Minimize strain on internal organs and body chemistry Maintain stable internal body chemistry and prevent candida/yeast growth Maintain mineral stores. Sugar is associated with depleting minerals like calcium. Grow a smaller baby, have an easier labor, increase your chance of spontaneous vaginal delivery without the need for intervention Return to your pre-pregnancy/ healthy weight easier and more naturally As always, eat a variety of wholesome foods: fresh vegetables, fruits, grains, beans, quality dairy and meat (unless you are vegan/vegetarian), as well and unrefined oils and fat. Foods should be partnered together for taste, enjoyment but also to reduce a glycemic rise. For example, combining carbohydrates with protein (salad and fish, rice and chicken), and fruit with fat (pear with nuts, banana and yogurt). These combinations allow sugars to be released slowly, instead of all at once. Eat smaller portions more frequently. Take the food you might normally eat in three meals and divide it into six, evenly spaced throughout the day. This can reduce digestive stress, and allow your meal to digest more easily, as well as keeping your blood sugar from having wide fluctuations throughout the day. Developing a daily exercise program is as important as eating well. Being active helps in two ways. First, every time you exercise, you use up blood sugar and keep levels lower for several hours. Exercising for a few minutes after every meal (even just a ten minute walk around the block), when your blood sugar levels are elevated, is an excellent practice. Secondly, exercise that builds muscle will create more cells that u Continue reading >>

Sugar Blues

Sugar Blues

Gestational Diabetes: A threat to mom and baby. At my 26-week OB appointment, I drank a bottle of extra-sweet soda—imagine Mountain Dew spiked with pancake syrup—and an hour later, submitted my arm for a blood test. I was being screened for gestational diabetes and, as a gym regular and healthy eater (except for those first-trimester French-toast binges), I wasn't worried. But the next day I learned that my blood sugar exceeded the cutoff level, and I'd need a more precise test involving an overnight fast, four blood draws and a soda twice as sweet as the first. This time I was worried. What were the chances that I could actually have gestational diabetes? If so, what would that mean for me and the twins I was carrying? How concerned should I be? These are hot-button questions in the medical community. High blood sugar during pregnancy, what doctors call gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), now affects 5 percent to 8 percent of expectant women, up from 4 percent about 20 years ago. Doctors have known for decades that GDM puts women at risk for having large babies and Cesarean sections; new studies indicate it may have long-term consequences and that it poses risks at lower blood-sugar levels than previously thought. The good news is that proper treatment reduces these risks. A diagnosis might sound scary, says Danielle Symons Downs, Ph.D., an assistant professor of kinesiology at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, "but for a woman who takes it seriously and makes lifestyle changes, it could be the best thing to happen to her and her offspring." The Sugar Story Gestational diabetes develops when hormones from the placenta compromise a woman's ability to use the insulin produced by her pancreas. Though most women compensate by producing extra insulin to Continue reading >>

My Wife Won't Stick To Her Gd Diet.

My Wife Won't Stick To Her Gd Diet.

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. She was diagnosed with GD at around 25 weeks. She attended all the educational sessions to learn about the diet to follow and at first she was doing well. As time went on she gradually started pushing the limits and cheating more frequently. She is now 37 weeks pregnant and she is not sticking to the diet at all. Every day she eats several things that are supposed to be off limits, like cake, chocolate and sugar filled drinks. I've tried everything to make her stop. I'm not a good cook but I try, and what I do cook is healthy but she turns her nose up it. I went to the Dr. with her the other day and he expressed very firmly that she needs to start sticking to the diet, but it made no impact whatsoever on her. I find her irresponsible actions to be incredibility selfish, if my child is born with problems because of her I will never forgive her. This is making me extremely anxious and depressed, I've lost all respect for her and after this I have no faith in her as a mother. I don't know what to do. Sweets and other fast carbs can be very addicting at the best of times. Add to that the hormones raging through a woman's body while she is pregnant and the associated cravings and aversions and it is easy to believe that she is all but helpless to do what she needs to do. I don't know what the educational sessions told her, if it was a fairly normal one, it would be having her eating enough carbs to keep from getting free of their additive nature. One thing that you can probably do to help (if you are not already doing it) is make this both of your diets. Lead by example and keep all temptations ou Continue reading >>

For The Pregnant Mom Who Failed Her Sugar Test… What You Really Want To Know

For The Pregnant Mom Who Failed Her Sugar Test… What You Really Want To Know

Recently, I got a text from a friend who is pregnant with twins. She said, “I just failed my sugar test and have to go back for the three-hour test… I’m sort of a sobbing mess about it right now, and I remember you saying you had gestational diabetes. Any words of advice?” It’s true. I actually had gestational diabetes with both of my pregnancies, though I’ve never written about it here. I was, of course, happy to share a little bit of my experience with my friend, but – since reaching through the phone to give her a hug wasn’t really an option – I mostly tried to encourage her that this wasn’t the WORST thing ever. I could absolutely relate to her feelings of worry, guilt, and sadness over the first (and, in my case, second) failed tests; but, for me, gestational diabetes ended up almost being a blessing in disguise. I was lucky enough to be able to manage mine through dietary changes both times and, in the end, delivered perfectly healthy little 7 pound babies. Other than the inconvenience and stress of having to prick my finger to take my sugars five times a day and not being able to eat donuts, gestational diabetes really was just a good incentive to eat healthier and get more physical activity during my pregnancies. I figured there are probably other mamas-to-be out there in similar situations (waiting to take the 3-hour test or recently diagnosed with GD), who might also benefit from hearing about my experience. So, below is my story with a few “words of advice” sprinkled in. First though, and hopefully this goes without saying, but just in case: I’m not a medical expert. If you have (or might have) gestational diabetes, you need to work with your doctor to make the necessary changes in your diet (and, possibly, figure out medications) to Continue reading >>

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