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Gestational Diabetes Now What

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes?

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes?

If you've just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes you may be feeling shocked, upset, overwhelmed, guilty, distressed, in denial, or asking "why me?". It can be a daunting and very confusing time. What may have been the perfect pregnancy could feel completely shattered, or additional complications to an already difficult pregnancy may feel like the last straw for you. You may be completely unaware of gestational diabetes and may have stopped eating in fear of causing high blood sugar levels, consequently harming your baby. You may be worried this could mean a pregnancy which is filled with additional hospital appointments, medication, insulin injections, intervention and feel like you will not be able to have the pregnancy and birth you hoped for. You may be worrying that you will now be diabetic for the rest of your life. You may be very emotional and may spend days crying through fear of the unknown or due to reading or hearing too many horror stories linked to gestational diabetes. STOP!... I aim to share with you some information, support and tips based on frequently asked questions in our gestational diabetes Facebook support group. This information is written by myself as a mother who has been exactly where you are right now. I've experienced 2 gestational diabetes pregnancies, have been researching gestational diabetes for a few years now. I have helped and supported thousands of ladies over the past two years. You're not alone... Just need help with diet? If your main worry is dietary advice, scroll to the bottom of this page for lots of dietary links Let it sink in but try not to panic Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes is a BIG deal for most ladies. You may have no idea what it means and are just struck with absolute horror and fear over what this Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

So Youve Had Gestational Diabetesnow What?

So Youve Had Gestational Diabetesnow What?

While most women breathe a sigh of relief after their babys delivery, those with gestational diabetes are often even more relieved. Finally, after weeks of managing diabetes and carefully watching what you eat, you are looking forward to getting back to your normal routine. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. All pregnant women are screened since it is most often a silent condition that develops in later pregnancy. It is thought to be caused by a combination of factors (genetic, hormonal, and obesity) that ultimately make it more difficult for the body to process sugar and carbohydrates. Since it is caused by pregnancy-specific factors, it often resolves at the end of pregnancy. In a small percentage of people, the diabetes does not resolve, likely because they had preexisting diabetes that was not picked up before pregnancy. While its true that gestational diabetes resolves itself postpartum for many women, it can still have other implications for your health. If youve had gestational diabetes, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life is seven times the risk of the average woman. Typically, the risk of developing diabetes is highest in the five years after pregnancy. The risk extends to the child, as well children whose mothers had gestational diabetes were at increased risk of developing obesity and diabetes later in life. Beyond diabetes, there are some heart health factors to consider. After gestational diabetes, women are at increased risk of high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, increasing the likelihood of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in women. Life gets busy after the birth of a child, and it can be difficult to stay on top of your health when when juggling pediatric appointments, vaccina Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

I Was Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes. Now What? - Prenate Vitamin Family

I Was Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes. Now What? - Prenate Vitamin Family

I was Diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes. Now what? Gestational diabetes (GD) is a condition that occurs during pregnancy when blood sugar levels are too high. While the diagnosis is not a lifelong concern, like other types of diabetes, it is still a scary and serious diagnosis as well as a condition that expecting mothers need to manage. By conservative estimates, 1 in 20 women will be diagnosed with GD during pregnancy.1 But some reports by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate the prevalence of GD may be as high as 9.2 percent.1 It is usually diagnosed in the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy.1 If left untreated or mismanaged, the impacts of GD on both moms and babies can be detrimental, even causing miscarriages or stillbirths.2 Because of the high stakes, management of GD is critical. If you are facing a GD diagnosis, the following lifestyle and diet adjustments can help lower blood sugar levels. The first step in managing GD is to bring blood sugar levels down through diet adjustments. This typically includes following a well-balanced diet of fruit, vegetables, dairy, whole grains and lean protein. Many women may not realize that their carbohydrate consumption could be contributing to their high blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates can be classified into two main groups: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates and higher in simple sugar and break down quicker. Because of this they tend to raise blood sugar quicker. Complex carbohydrates contain higher amounts of fiber, contain higher levels and break down slower. Try to avoid foods that contain simple carbohydrates, such as sodas, baked sweets and fruit juice concentrate. Start reviewing food labels and keep track of how many carbohydrates you consume daily. Although it may important for women with Continue reading >>

Week 28: Testing Positive For Gestational Diabetes

Week 28: Testing Positive For Gestational Diabetes

How I'm changing up my routine as I head into the third trimester. I’m in the home stretch now. Just about 12 weeks (plus or minus) until I can finally meet my baby boy Finn! The main overriding themes right now are continued low back pain, and being sleepier than I have been. To help with the low back pain, I’ve employed an array of various pillows when I sleep. I don’t have the one many pregnant women seem to use—the full body pillow—but I do have the fantastic Boppy Pregnancy Wedge, which really does help me sleep better when I stick it under my belly. Besides that, I’m using my usual memory foam pillow under my head, and a regular cheap bed pillow between my knees. Although it’s a bit of a physical feat everytime I need to roll from one side to the other to arrange it all just-so, the pillow variety is keeping me comfortable enough to sleep through the night at the moment. My naps have increased in length and frequency. Now, it seems that I need a good 3 to 3 ½ hour nap at least 3 times a week. On the other days, I don’t nap at all. But when I do feel tired, it’s almost like I’ve been hit with a tranquilizer dart. Must lay down NOW! I am behind on some things I really need to get done, but I am not being too hard on myself about it. Everyone keeps telling me to enjoy the rest now, so that’s what I’m doing. A bigger piece of news to report: At 26 ½ weeks, my health care provider had me take the GTT, or glucose tolerance test, for gestational diabetes. I’ve been feeling so great that I really couldn’t believe it, but my test came back positive—just barely. Apparently, I’m just over the line into having the diagnosis. What exactly does this mean, I wondered. According to the American Diabetes Association, many pregnant women get it and Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is first diagnosed during pregnancy. Like type 1 and type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes causes blood sugar levels to become too high. When you eat, your digestive system breaks down most of the food into a sugar called glucose. Glucose enters your bloodstream so your cells can use it as fuel. With the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), muscle, fat, and other cells absorb glucose from your blood. But if your body doesn't produce enough insulin, or if the cells have a problem responding to it, too much glucose remains in your blood instead of moving into cells and getting converted to energy. When you're pregnant, your body naturally becomes more resistant to insulin so that more glucose is available to nourish your baby. For most moms-to-be, this isn't a problem: When your body needs additional insulin to process excess glucose in blood, the pancreas secretes more. But if the pancreas can't keep up with the increased demand for insulin during pregnancy, blood sugar levels rise too high because the cells aren't using the glucose. This results in gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes needs to be recognized and treated quickly because it can cause health problems for mother and baby. Unlike other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes isn't permanent. Once a baby is born, blood sugar will most likely return to normal quickly. However, having gestational diabetes does make developing diabetes in the future more likely. Am I at risk of developing gestational diabetes? Anyone can develop gestational diabetes, and not all women who develop the condition have known risk factors. About 5 to 10 percent of all pregnant women get gestational diabetes. You're more likely to develop gestational diabetes if you Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes. Will My Baby Be Ok?

I Have Gestational Diabetes. Will My Baby Be Ok?

There is a good chance that your baby will be fine. Now that you, your GP and your midwife know that you have gestational diabetes (GD), you can work together to stabilise your blood sugar levels. It’s important to treat GD, because it can cause serious complications if it’s not controlled. That's why keeping your blood sugar stable is the best thing you can do for your baby. The trouble with having too much sugar in your blood is that it crosses the placenta to your baby. This means there's a risk that he could grow large. A big baby may make labour and vaginal birth more difficult, because there's a chance your baby's shoulder could get stuck behind your pelvic bone as you push him out (shoulder dystocia). Your doctor may advise you to have a caesarean birth. Sadly, with GD, there's a raised risk of pre-eclampsia and premature labour. More rarely, having uncontrolled GD can lead to a baby being stillborn. These risks can be kept very small if you control your blood sugar levels. You can do this by eating a healthy, balanced diet, made up of wholegrain carbohydrates, lean proteins and healthy fats. These types of food have a low glycaemic index (low GI), which helps your body to process sugar at a steadier rate. Keeping active and exercising daily will also help you, and your unborn baby, to stay well. Exercise will also help you to keep your weight gain at a healthy level, which is important for controlling GD. If, despite all your efforts, you can’t control GD through diet and exercise, your obstetrician will prescribe medication (metformin) or insulin injections. These are safe for pregnancy, and will help to protect your baby against the effects of GD. Your midwife and doctor will monitor you and your baby throughout pregnancy. You may have extra antenatal ap Continue reading >>

Youve Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes. Now What?

Youve Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes. Now What?

Youve Been Diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes. Now What? You have gestational diabetes. Hearing the news might come as a shock at first. The information you are provided might be confusing and overwhelming. Thats completely normal. Before you hop on Google and read everything you can about gestational diabetes, turn off the computer, put down your phone and take a breath. When it comes to gestational diabetes its important to remember that you arent to blame and you shouldnt feel guilty. Communicate with loved ones about the diagnosis and let them know your worries, concerns and feelings so that they can help you in coping with the anxiety you might feel and in helping to keep you on track. With a proper diet, exercise and, sometimes, medication, women who are expecting can help to control their gestational diabetes. These tips and suggestions will go a long way in helping you to manage the complication: Use your doctors, nurses and nutritionist Your team of doctors, nurses and nutritionists are there, not just to support you, but to educate you as well. Having open communication with your support team will calm your nerves and allow you to feel as though you are doing all you can to have a safe, healthy pregnancy. The quicker this happens, the easier it will be. Women with gestational diabetes should eat smaller portions more often. While sugary foods and sweets are typically a no-no, be aware that many carbs also include a lot of sugar. Stick with high protein, low carbs items and include salads and green veggies. You will need regular physical activity to help control your blood sugar levels. Not only will this assist in helping your blood sugar, but it will give you added energy and promote a healthier, overall, lifestyle. However, listen to your body. It will tel Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Medical experts haven't agreed on a single set of screening guidelines for gestational diabetes. Some question whether gestational diabetes screening is needed if you're younger than 25 and have no risk factors. Others say that screening all pregnant women is the best way to identify all cases of gestational diabetes. When to screen Your doctor will likely evaluate your risk factors for gestational diabetes early in your pregnancy. If you're at high risk of gestational diabetes — for example, your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy was 30 or higher or you have a mother, father, sibling or child with diabetes — your doctor may test for diabetes at your first prenatal visit. If you're at average risk of gestational diabetes, you'll likely have a screening test during your second trimester — between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Routine screening for gestational diabetes Initial glucose challenge test. You'll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you'll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. A blood sugar level below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 7.2 to 7.8 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it only means you have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. You'll need a glucose tolerance test to determine if you have the condition. Follow-up glucose tolerance testing. You'll fast overnight, then have your blood sugar level measured. Then you'll drink another sweet solution — this one containing a higher concentration of glucose — and your blood sugar level will be checked every hour for three hours. If at least two of the blood sugar readings are higher than normal, you'll Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Living With Gestational Diabetes

Living With Gestational Diabetes

Between three and 20 per cent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, depending on their risk factors. All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes within 28 weeks of pregnancy. What is Gestational Diabetes Mellitus? Gestational diabetes mellitus is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Your body cannot produce enough insulin to handle the effects of a growing baby and changing hormone levels. Insulin helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. If your body cannot produce enough insulin, your blood glucose (sugar) levels will rise. The good news Your baby will not be born with diabetes. Gestational diabetes can be managed and you can expect to have a happy, healthy baby. What does gestational diabetes mean for my baby? If left undiagnosed or untreated, gestational diabetes can lead to high blood glucose (sugar) levels. This increases the risk that your baby will weigh more than 4 kg (9lbs) and will have a difficult delivery. Gestational diabetes can also increase the risk of your baby becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes in the future. What does gestational diabetes mean for me? A diagnosis of gestational diabetes means you will be working closely with your health-care team to manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels and keep them in the target range. This will help you avoid complications in labour and delivery. After your baby is born, blood glucose (sugar) levels will usually return to normal. However, you are at greater risk for gestational diabetes in your next pregnancy and of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Risk factors for gestational diabetes Being: 35 years of age or older From a high-risk group (Aboriginal, Hispanic, South Asian, Asian and African) Obese (BMI of 30kg/m2 or Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

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