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Gestational Diabetes No Sugar In Urine

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes can cause a range of complications during pregnancy. Fortunately, a woman can help reduce complications by following a healthful diet. What foods should women eat and what foods should they avoid if they have gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs if a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin, during her pregnancy. This deficiency leads to high blood sugar. High blood sugar levels may cause problems for the woman and her baby if not managed properly. This article explains what type of diet a woman should follow during pregnancy if she has gestational diabetes. It also considers other treatment options for gestational diabetes and what complications may occur if the condition is not properly managed. Contents of this article: Understanding gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes each year in the United States. This type of diabetes occurs when a woman's body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps the body's cells to use sugar from the blood as energy. When a woman is pregnant, her body will produce more hormones, and she may put on weight. Both of these changes may mean that her body's cells may not use insulin as well as they used to. This is called insulin resistance. Becoming resistant to insulin means that the body needs more of it in order to use up the sugar in the blood. Sometimes a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin to keep up. This leads to a sugar buildup in the blood, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Symptoms of gestational diabetes may include: being unusually thirsty Continue reading >>

Anyone With Gestational Diabetes??

Anyone With Gestational Diabetes??

Hey girls...I was in hospital on saterday with contractions. Luckily for me and little man they eased of completely after spending almost 7 hours in hospital. My cervix was closed too which is wonderfull. I was given the option to stay in or come home. I chose coming home,as we only live 20 mins from the hospital. They found some glucose in my urine too...and have been talking about doing a glucose test. My question are for you ladies who have gestational diabetes. What signs or symptoms did you have before having the test done??? I'm glad everything is ok with your little one Personally I had no symptoms and still don't, absoloutly nothing. No glucose in urine, babies aren't big, they don't have big tummies etc etc. I got my blood test done because they routinely test women with a high bmi for gestational diabetes. Mine's fairly easily controlled with diet though None whatsoever! Mine was picked up when my blood sugar was 0.1mmol/L over during a random test. Having glucose in your urine doesn't mean you have GD but if you're worried, I would get the test They found some glucose in my urine too...and have been talking about doing a glucose test. I've had 3 glucose positive urine samples but when they tested my blood my blood sugar levels were normal. In other words just because the glucose is showing up in your urine it doesn't mean that it's getting into your blood stream or to baby. Hopefully that's the case for you as well. Good luck with your blood test. Thanks girls...Im seeing my mw tomorrow for the test forms so will have them done. Ive not been feeling well since friday and im feeling worse today. I feel sick all the time,dizzy and just not well. And im sitting down! I just dont feel right. I just spoke to my mw and she said oh maybe im just not feeling great a Continue reading >>

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine tests provide your doctor or midwife with important information about diseases or conditions that could potentially affect you or your growing baby. That's why at each prenatal visit, you'll be asked to give a urine sample as part of your regular exam. This sample is used to help determine if you have diabetes, kidney disease, or a bladder infection by measuring the levels of sugar, protein, bacteria, or other substances in your urine. The test is routine and painless and could prevent a lot of trouble down the road. What does a urine test involve? Urine can be collected any time of day. You will most likely be given a sterile cup to collect a sample before your exam. Before urinating, use a sterile towelette to wipe your genitals from front to back, and then release a small amount of urine into the toilet -- this prevents the sample from being contaminated with bacteria or other secretions that may invalidate the results. Put the container in your urine stream, and collect at least one to two ounces. This sample is then checked with chemically treated testing strips or sticks, and the results are usually available right away. If more analysis is necessary, your urine may be sent to a lab for additional assessment. What can a urine test detect? Sugar Typically, there is very little or no sugar (glucose) in urine during pregnancy. But when blood sugar levels in the body are too high, excess sugar can end up in the urine. This can be seen with gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that only develops during pregnancy. It occurs when pregnancy hormones disrupt the body's ability to use insulin, a chemical that turns blood sugar into energy. A doctor often orders a blood test for diabetes early in your pregnancy if he or she knows you have other risk factors, like a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Home » About Diabetes » Pregnancy » Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is the type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Like other forms od diabetes, gestational diabetes affects the way the body uses the glucose [sugar] in the blood and as a result the blood sugars rise too high. The glucose in the blood is the body’s main source of energy. If gestational diabetes is untreated or uncontrolled, it can result in a variety of health problems for both that mother and baby. So it is important that a treatment plan is worked out to keep blood sugars within the normal range. The good news is that controlling blood sugars can help to ensure a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Signs and Symptoms Most women do not have any signs or symptoms of gestational diabetes but your healthcare professional will check for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. When signs and symptoms do occur they include: Excessive thirst Increased urination. About 3 to 5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. The Causes of Gestational Diabetes Normal metabolism Normally during digestion the body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into simple sugars [glucose] and this glucose is absorbed into the blood and transported around the body by the blood vessel system to provide the energy needed for all our activities. This process cannot take place without insulin. Insulin is produced in the pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, and helps the glucose to pass into the cells to provide energy and maintains normal levels of glucose in the blood. The liver also plays a part in maintaining normal blood glucose levels. When there is more glucose in the cells than your body needs for energy, it is removed from the blood and stored it in the liver Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Approximately 3 to 5 percent of all pregnant women in the United States are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes. These women and their families have many questions about this disorder. Some of the most frequently asked questions are: What is gestational diabetes and how did I get it? How does it differ from other kinds of diabetes? Will it hurt my baby? Will my baby have diabetes? What can I do to control gestational diabetes? Will I need a special diet? Will gestational diabetes change the way or the time my baby is delivered? Will I have diabetes in the future? This brochure will address these and many other questions about diet, exercise, measurement of blood sugar levels, and general medical and obstetric care of women with gestational diabetes. It must be emphasized that these are general guidelines and only your health care professional(s) can tailor a program specific to your needs. You should feel free to discuss any concerns you have with your doctor or other health care provider, as no one knows more about you and the condition of your pregnancy. What is gestational diabetes and what causes it? Diabetes (actual name is diabetes mellitus) of any kind is a disorder that prevents the body from using food properly. Normally, the body gets its major source of energy from glucose, a simple sugar that comes from foods high in simple carbohydrates (e.g., table sugar or other sweeteners such as honey, molasses, jams, and jellies, soft drinks, and cookies), or from the breakdown of complex carbohydrates such as starches (e.g., bread, potatoes, and pasta). After sugars and starches are digested in the stomach, they enter the blood stream in the form of glucose. The glucose in the blood stream becomes a potential source of energy for the entire body, sim Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

How To Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar When Youre Pregnant

How To Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar When Youre Pregnant

When youre pregnant, you may wonder why your obstetrician asks for a urine sample at prenatal checkups. One thing your doctor watches is glucose.Its normal for someto show up, but if it shows up repeatedly or in large amounts, it is sometimes a sign that you have gestational diabetes (high blood sugar during pregnancy). Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Most women getscreened for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks into their pregnancy. If there is a lotof glucose in your urine in earlyprenatal visits, however, youll probablydo the screening sooner. For people who have risk factors for gestational diabetes, we usually recommend that they get screening early in pregnancy usually in the first trimester, says Ob/Gyn Jeff Chapa, MD . Your doctor likely will talk to you aboutseveral risk factors during your early checkups. Dr. Chapa says you are more likely to get gestational diabetes if: You are overweight, with a body mass index over 30 You had a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Your blood sugar levels are highin the urine or blood Your family has a history of type 2 diabetes Women who have a few of these factors often get an early screening. Your doctor will ask you to take a test called the oral glucose tolerance test. Heres what happens: During the test, you quickly drink a sweetened liquid which contains 50 grams of glucose. Your body absorbs this glucose quickly, causing your blood sugar levels to rise. You will have blood drawn from your arm about 60 minutes after drinking thesugary liquid. The blood test measures how well your body processes the glucose solution. If your test results are not normal, you likely w Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

If you’re a pregnant woman, probably one of the last things you want to hear is that you have gestational diabetes. Your thoughts might range from, “What did I do to cause this?” to “Will my baby be OK?” First, keep in mind that it’s perfectly normal to feel scared and worried. Second, while gestational diabetes (GDM) is indeed serious, remember that, with proper management, you can have a healthy baby. Once you’re diagnosed If you find out that you have GDM, be prepared to learn a lot about diabetes! You’ll likely be referred to a diabetes educator and/or a dietitian. You might also be referred to an endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. In most cases, you’ll be seen by a member of your health-care team about every two weeks. Be prepared to start checking your blood glucose with a meter, following a meal plan, checking your urine for ketones, recording your food and glucose levels, and possibly starting on insulin. In other words, be prepared to do some homework! Your team is there to support you and make sure that you receive the right treatment. Treating GDM There are a number of ways in which GDM is treated, and they all work together to help ensure that your blood glucose levels stay in a safe range throughout your pregnancy. Remember that the goal is to keep your blood glucose in a normal range; this is because, when blood glucose levels are too high, the extra glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. Too much glucose can cause your baby to be too large, and may cause other complications for both you and your baby during delivery and later on (such as Type 2 diabetes). Nutrition and meal planning. The saying that “you’re eating for two” during your pregnancy is partly correct. You ARE eating f Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Can You Prevent Gestational Diabetes?

Can You Prevent Gestational Diabetes?

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition that can occur during pregnancy. If you have gestational diabetes, it means you have higher blood sugar levels than normal during pregnancy. Approximately 9 percent of pregnant women experience gestational diabetes. If you do have gestational diabetes, it’s important to get treated quickly since it can cause problems for both your health and your baby’s. The causes of gestational diabetes are not fully understood and it can’t be prevented entirely. But you can lower your risk of developing it. Keep reading to learn more about this condition and what you can do to decrease your risk. The causes of gestational diabetes aren’t known, but it is associated with a variety of risk factors. Those factors include: being over age 25 being overweight having a close relative with type 2 diabetes having higher-than-normal blood glucose levels prior to pregnancy, or signs of insulin resistance, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome or acanthosis nigricans Some ethnic groups are also at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes, and include: African-American Asian-American Hispanic Native American Pacific Islander The best way to lower your risk for gestational diabetes is by being healthy before you get pregnant. If you’re overweight, work on improving your diet, eating healthy food, and exercising regularly. Talk with your doctor about the best way for you to lose weight, since even a few pounds can make a difference in your risk level for gestational diabetes. If you’re inactive, start regular physical activity at least three times a week. After you’re pregnant, don’t try to lose weight, but do continue a healthy diet that focuses on vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Exercise moder Continue reading >>

I'm Pregnant And The Doctor Found Sugar In My Urine

I'm Pregnant And The Doctor Found Sugar In My Urine

I'm pregnant and the doctor found sugar in my urine At my doctor's check-up today, a small trace of sugar was present in my urine. The doctor pricked my finger and tested my blood and said that the trac... At my check-up today, a small trace of sugar was present in my urine. The doctor pricked my finger and tested my blood and said the trace was fine (the reading was 5.8mmol/L) and that small traces of sugar are quite common in late pregnancy. The doctor didn't seem concerned, so I didn't ask any questions. Now I'm wondering if I should be taking any special precautions, such as changing my diet, or if I should be concerned that this is an indicator of potential problems. In pregnancy, the body changes the way it manages glucose and reacts to insulin. For some, the extent of these changes means a diagnosis of gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy) is made. In some countries a short glucose tolerance test is done at around 28-weeks in all women to detect this. In the UK women are usually screened if they; develop glucose (sugar) in the urine, which is common and often doesn't develop into gestational diabetes show signs of excess fluid around the baby. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes is usually made if the fasting blood sample is greater than 7mmol/l or if the two-hour level is greater than 11.1mmol/l. Cut off levels for diagnosis vary a little between different units. Your blood glucose level was entirely normal. If someone is diagnosed with gestational diabetes, the mainstay of treatment is a diet with reduced fat , increased fibre and regulation of carbohydrate intake. Eliminating certain foods from your diet can lead to rapid improvement, for example high calorie drinks, snack foods and fresh orange juice. While the result of your blood test means there Continue reading >>

Bump Measuring Big But No Sugar In Urine. Is Mw Having A Hairy About Nothing?

Bump Measuring Big But No Sugar In Urine. Is Mw Having A Hairy About Nothing?

I measured 2-3 weeks ahead consistently throughout (wasn't offered any further scans or GTT test) and my midwife suggested several times that our baby would be around 8.5-9lb. He was born at 40+1 and weighed 6lb 10oz! I just had a lot of fluid. I have had GD since week 28, but no sugar has ever been detected in my urine (only via bloods during the glucose tolerance test). I've measured 4-6cm big throughout. I think they now allow 4cm either way before they start thinking scans/bloods etc. The most important thing seems to be your trend, like you said, they have no other measurements for you. I was brought back alternate weeks on 3 occasions to confirm the measurement. My midwife was really clear that fundal height is a crap tool, but it's all she has in clinic - so I got scanned. The extra growth scan showed a normal, but 90th centile baby, normal fluid etc. my bloods are all fine (I didn't have a GTT) Now, I get measured and charted, most recently 35cm at 30 weeks, but no one panics. I just make big bumps! I am on pregnancy no3, have measured very large with all 3, this one I am measuring 34 weeks at 28weeks . I have been tested for gd and I definately don't have it. As my consultant said, "some women just carry big babies or just look very large" . My first weighed 9lb, my second weighed 10.9lb, I am hoping miracles will happen and that this baby will be 8lb something! AnAdventureInCakeAndWineWed 15-Jan-14 08:28:13 A one-off measurement that's 3 weeks ahead is nothing to be concerned about, and your MW shouldn't have worried you. If you're consistently measuring considerably ahead for several appointments then they are more likely to refer you for a growth scan. I suspect having a previous 9lb baby has ticked one of the GD risk factor boxes, and IIRC they will refer Continue reading >>

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