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Gestational Diabetes Lunch Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal IdeasPhoto Credit: ginew/iStock/Getty Images Teresa Cantilli has been working as a Registered Dietitian for 18 years. She is a Certified Diabetes Educator and an ACE Certified Personal Trainer. She earned her Master's Degree in Clinical Nutrition from the New York Institute of Technology. Her work has appeared in The New Standard Newsletter for the NSLIJHS, where she has been working for 10 years, and the book "Migraine Expressions." Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. This disorder, characterized by elevated blood sugar levels, is usually diagnosed between 24 and 28 weeks gestation. The cornerstones of managing GDM include regular physical activity and a nutritious, well balanced diet that controls the amount of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. While its essential for women with GDM to meet with a dietitian to receive a meal plan that takes individual calorie and nutrient needs into account, sample menu ideas can provide ideas to get started before this dietitian visit. A healthy diet is an important part of any pregnancy. For women with GDM, a nutritious, balanced diet promotes adequate weight gain and optimal fetal growth -- and also helps manage blood sugar levels. Because carbohydrate foods such as breads, grains, fruit, milk, starchy vegetables and desserts impact blood sugar the most, women with GDM need to ensure they are spreading these foods throughout the day, and limiting added sugars, desserts, and other sweets. Also, women with GDM are encouraged to eat every 2 to 3 hours -- typically 3 meals and 3 snacks daily -- to control blood sugars and provide necessary nourishment. Carbohydrate-containing foods are converted to glucose or sugar in the body, and insulin is necessary to remove e Continue reading >>

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes

Here are some suggested low glycaemic meal ideas that could help control your blood sugar levels if you have gestational diabetes. These foods below are generally recommended but you might find they do not not work for you and they increase your blood glucose levels. If so, try something else. There is more advice here on choosing low glycaemic index foods , as well as other top tips for eating with gestational diabetes. 1. Unsweetened porridge (large, or jumbo oats are best) or muesli with no added sugar. Avoid sweetened breakfast cereals 2. Grilled lean bacon with one slice of wholegrain, multigrain or granary toast 4. Boiled eggs and wholegrain, multigrain or granary toast 5. Plain yoghurt and fruit (berries are lower in natural sugar) 1. Beans on toast (try wholegrain, granary or rye) 4. Baked potato (try using a sweet potato) and baked beans 1. Wholemeal pasta with a vegetable or chicken sauce 3. Poached chicken with brown or basmati rice 4. Grilled fish with butter beans or other pulses 1. Fruit such as apples, oranges, pears, peaches, bananas 3. Hummus and carrot sticks or other crudits 5. Oatcakes with unsweetened peanut butter Read more about diet and exercise with gestational diabetes The glycaemic index is a measure of how quickly sugars are released into the bloodstream. Knowing what foods to avoid helps control gestational diabetes. Women who are overweight are at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes, although many women who develop it are not overweight at all. Exercise during pregnancy has a wide range of benefits for you and your baby. If you have gestational diabetes, you have even more reason to exercise: it can help reduce your blood glucose. If you have gestational diabetes, your diet will become an important part of managing your conditio Continue reading >>

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

This sample diet for gestational diabetes is only an example of what is practical. Talk to your health care team for more specific details about the correct diet for you. The goal is to provide enough nutrients to support your body and meet the needs of your growing baby. At the same time, the diet must maintain proper blood glucose levels. Your calorie requirements will change during your pregnancy. For example, you would need extra 300 calories per day during the second and third trimester. The following diet plan is an example only. The purpose is to show you some variations and ideas. Every woman is unique and so are her dietary requirements. Therefore, it is vital that you follow a diet plan designed for you personally. Speak to your health care team to model a diet plan that is appropriate for you. Meal planning should focus on eating several small meals throughout the day. Small, frequent meals support the stabilization of blood glucose levels better than larger, infrequent meals. The combinations of foods are also very important. The age-old saying is "An apple a day keeps the doctor away." Eating seven apples on Sunday is a bad thing, where one per day is good. Another non-negotiable rule is to drink at least eight glasses of water every day. Adding to the examples below, drink at least eight glasses of water per day. A glass of water with every meal and snack, and you have had six glasses already. Drinking plenty of water is important in building body fluids, digestion and blood circulation. Extra water also aids the kidneys in expelling the extra sugar from the blood. Find out more about portion sizes at: Gestational Diabetes Menu. Sample Diet for Gestational Diabetes for Monday Breakfast. 2 Scrambled eggs. 1 slice of whole wheat bread, plain or toast. 1 teas Continue reading >>

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes

Well I failed the 3 hour test today.... I didn't even make it past the fasting ***. I failed so bad that I was diagnosed right then. I don't get to see my doctor until Monday. What can I expect? Did you ladies have an ultrasound to check the baby's weight? I am not sure what to eat. I need to bring my lunch to work so I need some easy meal ideas. I am not much of a cook and I am actually pretty picky. So this should be interesting for me! @mommyof2beauties2010 I have GD as well. For lunch ideas, you might consider low carb bread for sandwiches, or also Weight Watchers or Lean Cuisine meals that are low in carbs. For supper, we grill a lot, and eat a lot of fresh veggies. Summer is a good time (not that any time is a good time, but it is better than winter, I guess) to have GD because of all the fresh produce available! I got diagnosed about 3 weeks ago and know how frustrated the meal planning can be, especially for a picky eater! Right now for lunch I'm supposed to have 4-5 servings of carbs so I've been eating wraps (the tortillas I buy are 30 carbs each or 2 servings, plus meat, cheese, & veggies are all carb free, ranch dressing has negligible amounts of carbs so I don't even bother counting it). With that I can then have some chips or something to make up another 2 servings of carbs, or I'll just do two of them. The nice thing about the wraps is you can put as much meat on there as you want & as much veggies as you like. I'm not much of a veggie eater, so I've been doing cucumbers, lettuce, and red onion. For supper I'm also supposed to have 4-5 servings of carbs also, so usually I'll grill a cheeseburger (big hamburger buns are 2 servings of carbs, again meat & cheese don't count) and I'll find something to eat along with it, plus I'll have a salad or some raw ve Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Eating Well

Eating Well

We hope that the following practical information on eating and staying well will help you feel positive and encouraged to stick to the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet. The GDM diet is basically a really healthy way of eating which can benefit the whole family. Read on for tips on everything from exercising, eating cake and dealing with hunger. Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator What about exercise? What’s the deal with carbs? So you’ve just found out that you need to manage your daily carbohydrate (carb) intake. This can be a little tricky. Carbs are now a problem for you but also the solution. You need carbs and your baby needs carbs. Carbohydrates are our energy food. They are contained in many important food groups i.e. bread and cereals, fruits, vegetables and dairy. You can’t just cut them out or your diet would end up unbalanced and insufficient but too much of them means too much glucose in your bloodstream. The answer is this. You need to eat a consistent and moderate amount of carbs regularly through the day. Timing: Ideally you should be eating every 2.5-3hrs. Leaving a much longer gap means you might get too hungry and want to eat more when you finally do eat. Eating every hour means your body is going to find it too hard to keep processing all the time. Try having 3 meals and 3 small snacks through the day. These should be at times of the day that suit you. Type & Amount: Choose nutritious or high-fibre carbs i.e. wholegrain breads and crackers, pasta, starchy vegetables such as corn and potato, legumes, low fat dairy milk and yoghurt and fruit. A fist-sized amount of carbohydrate is a good rule of thumb to go by until you see a dietitian. This is usually equal to about a standard cup measure (2 Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

Recipes

Recipes

These recipes have been adapted from safefood with information tailored to those with Diabetes. Check out the food and diabetes section on the website for more information and background to healthy eating for diabetes. You will find that some of these recipes include sugar and that the traffic light system indicates red, as the recipe may be high in sugars but this does not mean that they can’t be included as part of a balanced diet. We are trying to increase awareness that having diabetes does not mean you must follow a diet that restricts sugar, as this is not the case. Small amounts of sugar are fine, particularly if they are combined with foods that are high in fibre. Desserts, biscuits and confectionery are not forbidden but because these are also usually high in calories, fat and sugar, people with diabetes should only have these occasionally. Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

This post contains affiliate links. This means that I make a small commission off of purchases made through my links at no extra charge to you. All opinions are my own. When I was pregnant with Bensen, my biggest struggle came when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Some women cry when their regular clothes don't fit anymore, I cried when my carb intake became drastically limited and I realized just how many high carb foods I enjoy. I knew going into that pregnancy that I was at risk for GD because I was pre-diabetic, a little overweight and have a family history of Type II diabetes, but getting that confirmation that I indeed had it was rough for me. I'm here to tell you that I survived and that six weeks postpartum, I was healthier than I'd been when I first got pregnant! My diagnosis came the week of Valentine's Day, so my loving husband changed his plans for our celebration. Instead of going to our favorite pasta restaurant, stuffing ourselves silly, and then coming home to lounge on the couch in front of a movie, he planned and prepared a low carb dinner at home and then we went for a walk. It meant a lot to me because I knew how much time and effort he'd put into researching and preparing our meal, and also how much of a sacrifice it was for him to eat the same thing that I was eating and nothing more. He told me later that he was hungry within a couple of hours because the meal just wasn't filling enough for him. During those last two months of my pregnancy, I learned to love vegetables and eat foods that I never would have considered in the past. After a few weeks of testing my blood sugar levels before and after each meal, I learned what I needed to eat and do to keep them level throughout the day. Some days were better than others, but I was diligent a Continue reading >>

Example Meal Plan Gestational Diabetes Uk

Example Meal Plan Gestational Diabetes Uk

Eat low amounts of unrefined complex starchy carbohydrates at every meal Bulk up meals with lots of vegetables & salad All the meals and snacks in this plan follow the 8 golden rules ; they have been paired and follow the basis of eating little and often, high protein, high natural fats, low complex carbs, bulking up on vegetables and salad. In order for this dietary advice to work you also need to follow the guidance around drinking plenty and going for a stroll after your main meal. We advise drinking a glass of water every time you eat and also one between each meal or snack. This is based on drinking around 3 litres of water a day which may sound like a lot to some, but a small glass of water with and between each time you eat will really impact your blood sugar levels and will assist with flushing any excess sugar from your system. For more information on drinks, please read more here Ingredients: 1 small or a large slightly green to yellow banana,2 large eggs, butter or coconut oil,Greek full fat yoghurt, a few berries, almonds, seeds Mash the banana, crack the eggs into a bowl and whisk.Add the mashed banana to the eggs and mix until blended.Heat a frying pan and add butter or coconut oil.Drop the batter into the pan (2 tbl sp per pancake), fry for 1 minute, or until the bottom of the pancake has browned slightly.Flip the pancake over (very gently as the mixture is fairly wet meaning the pancakes can break easily) and cook the other side.Serve warm with full fat Greek yoghurt, berries, nuts, seeds and add sweetener or agave nectar if you wish Spanish Frittata with grilled halloumi and salad Ingredients;500g leftover cooked new potatoes or boiled potatoes,1 onion,olive oil for cooking,3 tbl sp chopped flatleaf parsley,6 eggs,ham (omit for vegetarian version),grat Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Tetra Images/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images The food cravings and aversions of pregnancy often make meal planning and eating a bit more complicated, and gestational diabetes only adds to this complexity. When it comes to meal ideas and recipes, a woman with gestational diabetes needs tobe most mindful of carbohydrates, which is the nutrient that impacts blood sugars the most. Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Diabetes means that glucose (sugar) levels in a person's bloodstream are too high. Normally, the hormone insulin , which is produced by an organ called the pancreas, absorbs and uses glucose that comes from your food. During pregnancy, though, a woman's hormones make it difficult for her to use insulin (this is called insulin resistance). In other words, she has to use a lot more insulin, up to three times as much, to bring down glucose levels in the blood. In some pregnant women (around 9 percent, according to the American Diabetes Association) their body cannot make enough insulin to keep their glucose levels within the normal rangethis condition is called gestational diabetes. In order to control blood sugar, women with gestational diabetes need to follow a carbohydrate-controlled diet. Sometimes, if a diet is not enough to control blood glucose levels, a woman may need to also take insulin or an oral medication like metformin . When planning your meals (under the guidance of your healthcare team), there are a couple tidbits to keep in mind. One is that your sensitivity and reactivity to carbohydrates may increase as your pregnancy progresses. Also, pregnancy with diabetes can make big demands on time which can influence your ability to preparehome-made meals. Thi Continue reading >>

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes?

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes?

Hi, I need some fast ideas for low gi meal and snacks please.Im almost 33 weeks pregnant and this baby is measuring on the 97th percentile! DS1 was 6pounds 8 and I tested positive for gestational diabetes, DS2 was 8 pounds but I wasn't tested, I tested negative for gestational diabetes this time round but a 4d scan showed its measuring big so the midwife will look at the results in 2 weeks at my appt.In the meantime please give me any low gi meal/snack ideas which are speedy to prepare, will continue to cook normally for the family.I was thinking maybe lots of roasted veg with chicken and salad - anyone know of a low gi dressing? Is some mayo ok? Could I roast some veg and freeze it? Or how long would it be ok for in the fridge?What about wraps with lots of salad/cheese or chicken or tuna??Jacket potatoes with beans and cheese or chicken mayo?Im a bit worried about changing my eating as it feels like a 'diet' and I expect I will loose weight which just feels wrong in pregnancy??Any tips from any other g.d women or women who have ideas?Thanks Hi, I need some fast ideas for low gi meal and snacks please. Im almost 33 weeks pregnant and this baby is measuring on the 97th percentile! DS1 was 6pounds 8 and I tested positive for gestational diabetes, DS2 was 8 pounds but I wasn't tested, I tested negative for gestational diabetes this time round but a 4d scan showed its measuring big so the midwife will look at the results in 2 weeks at my appt. In the meantime please give me any low gi meal/snack ideas which are speedy to prepare, will continue to cook normally for the family. I was thinking maybe lots of roasted veg with chicken and salad - anyone know of a low gi dressing? Is some mayo ok? Could I roast some veg and freeze it? Or how long would it be ok for in the fridge? Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes & Lunch Suggestions? - Mothering Forums

Gestational Diabetes & Lunch Suggestions? - Mothering Forums

Meat, meat, more meat and cheese. Lots of sandwiches. For my first pregnancy I ate a lot of pb&low sugar j but ds is allergic to peanuts and I'm really sick of almond butter, but that makes a good sand or a nice snack, esp w/ apple slices. I can't do pasta, but Ezekial bread (or any bread w/ an under-15 carb count) is ok for me, esp if I load it up w/ mayo. I'm not a salad fan unless someone else is making it but I'll eat cut up veggies like carrots or peppers and some pickles on the side. I also love hummus and that's ok for my levels--just puree chickpeas w/ some olive oil, salt, a little lemon, tahini if you've got it. I'll throw some raw vegs in there too for a veg boost. I'll eat that w/ vegs or just plain. Egg salad. Recently I've been making some yummy chicken salad and it's easy to hide a lot of vegs in there. I add a small serving of fruit (small apple or orange, 1/2 C blueberries, etc) as well. I like canned soup b/c it's so easy but the sodium is crazy so I try not to. Lots of leftovers, too. Tonight we had chili so that'll be tomorrow's lunch. Lunch isn't so tough for me, esp since I tend to eat out a lot. Burgers are my standby, or salad of course if I'm being good. B'fast is the hardest because I'm soooo sick of eggs! Not to go all ot but I've found that a piece of toast w/ cream cheese (a lot of cc) and jam doesn't spike me and it's a change from eggs. I got a diet plan from a registered diabetes ed/dietican last time and I pretty much just ate the same thing every day and I guess I'll start to again. Continue reading >>

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