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Gestational Diabetes Log

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed during pregnancy when your body cannot cope with the extra demand for insulin production resulting in high blood glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is managed by monitoring blood glucose levels, adopting a healthy eating plan and performing regular physical activity. Effective management of gestational diabetes will reduce the risk of complications during pregnancy and the birth of your baby. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. There are three basic components in effectively managing gestational diabetes: monitoring blood glucose levels adopting a healthy eating pattern physical activity. Gestational diabetes can often initially be managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity. However, for some women with gestational diabetes, insulin injections will be necessary for the rest of the pregnancy. Approximately 10 – 20% of women will need insulin; however, once the baby is born insulin is no longer needed. This is safe for both you and your baby. After the baby is born, gestational diabetes usually disappears. A special blood glucose test (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) (OGTT) is performed six weeks after delivery to ensure that blood glucose levels have returned to normal. However, women who have had gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life and should be tested for diabetes at least every 2 – 3 years. If gestational diabetes is not well looked after (blood glucose levels remain high) it may result in problems such as a large baby, miscarriage and stillbirth. A large baby can create the risk of injury at delivery, caesarean delivery, Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Diabetes Glossary

Diabetes Glossary

The following is a list of diabetes-related terms and their definitions. These words, listed in alphabetical order, are the most common ones you will hear when you are discussing diabetes. *Please note many of these definitions are product specific. A A1C (HbA1c) - Glycosylated hemoglobin. A1C (HbA1c) test - A 2-3 month average of blood glucose values expressed in percent. The normal range varies with different labs and is expressed in percent (such as 4 - 6%). AACE - American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. A professional organization devoted to the field of clinical endocrinology. ACE - American College of Endocrinology. *Accept - Pressing the ACT button to approve the selection or setting. *Active insulin - Bolus insulin that has been delivered to your body, but has not yet been used. ADA - American Diabetes Association®. Adult-onset diabetes - Former term for Type 2 diabetes. Adverse reaction - An unexpected, unpleasant or dangerous reaction to a sensor when it is inserted into the body. An adverse reaction may be sudden or may develop over time. *Alarm - Audible or vibrating (silent) notice that indicates the pump is in Attention mode and immediate attention is required. Alarms are prefixed in the alarm history with the letter A. *Alarm clock - Feature you can set to go off at specified times of the day. *Alarm history - Screen that displays the last 36 alarms/errors that have occurred on your pump. *Alarm icon - A solid circle that shows at the top of the screen and the pump beeps or vibrates periodically until the condition is cleared (see Attention mode). *Alert - Audible or vibrating (silent) indicator that notifies you the pump needs attention soon or that you should be reminded of something. Insulin delivery continues as programmed. *Alert icon - A Continue reading >>

Printable, Savable, Editable Diabetes Logsheets

Printable, Savable, Editable Diabetes Logsheets

Free Editable / Printable Diabetes Logbooks, Record Sheets: We have a variety of printable logsheets / charts that you can either print or also use in microsoft word or mac pages. Detailed 3-Day Logsheet: This is the same as the weekly logsheet, but the columns are broken down by hour and it includes more area for notes. 3 days per page. Insulin Pump User Log sheet: A record keeping form for pump users. 3 days on a page, broken down by hours. Includes room for blood sugars, grams of carbohydrate, boluses, basal rates, physical activity and notes. Rotating Pattern Logsheet – Record (for Type 2 diabetes): This logsheet is ideal for those with Type 2 diabetes. It includes 6 days per page and space for blood sugars, medication, food and activity input. The gray boxes denote alternating test/recording times in order to capture patterns throughout the day and night. Word Doc: Rotating Pattern Logsheet (for Type 2 Diabletes) Printable PDF: Type 2 diabetes logbook with rotating pattern Weekly Blood Sugar Pattern Worksheet: Use this printable weekly logsheet to track your blood sugar patterns by recording your readings before all meals and snacks. Word Doc: Weekly Blood Sugar Patterns Logsheet Printable PDF: Weekly Blood Sugar Patterns Logsheet Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

PDF Format Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes mellitus that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Some women found to have gestational diabetes actually may have had mild diabetes before pregnancy that was not diagnosed. What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") is a condition that causes high levels of glucose in the blood (see the FAQ Diabetes and Women). Glucose is a sugar that is the body’s main source of energy. Health problems can occur when glucose levels are too high. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by a change in the way a woman’s body responds to insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone. It moves glucose out of the blood and into the body’s cells where it can be turned into energy. During pregnancy, a woman’s cells naturally become slightly more resistant to insulin’s effects. This change is designed to increase the mother’s blood glucose level to make more nutrients available to the baby. The mother’s body makes more insulin to keep the blood glucose level normal. In a small number of women, even this increase is not enough to keep their blood glucose levels in the normal range. As a result, they develop gestational diabetes. Will I be tested for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes. You may be asked about your medical history and risk factors or you may have a blood test to measure the level of glucose in your blood. This test usually is done between 24 weeks and 28 weeks of pregnancy. It may be done earlier if you have risk factors. If I develop gestational diabetes, will I always have diabetes mellitus? For most women, gestational diabetes goes away after childbirth. How Continue reading >>

A Sweet Pea In The Pod: Controlling Your Gestational Diabetes

A Sweet Pea In The Pod: Controlling Your Gestational Diabetes

A sweet pea in the pod: Controlling your gestational diabetes Taking a gestational diabetes class can help put your mind at ease. Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Decorating the nursery, picking out tiny clothes and shoes, studying sonogram printouts to determine whose nose he hasfor most expectant mothers, these are the activities that consume the time awaiting babys big arrival. But for some, the biggest concern isnt how to dress the bumpits how to manage their blood sugar to keep the bump safe. Finding out you have gestational diabetes can trigger a slew of questions and even more concern, but it doesnt have to be scary. Most of the time, gestational diabetes can be controlled and treated during pregnancy so you can go on to deliver a healthy, bouncing baby. Much like birthing classes prepare expectant mothers for delivery, attending a gestational diabetes class can give you a leg up on controlling your blood sugar and may even put your mind at ease. One such class is offered by Texas A&M Healthy South Texas in conjunction with Driscoll Childrens Hospital in Corpus Christi. Claudia Perkins, registered dietitian and health educator with the program, has helped many worried moms-to-be gain control of their gestational diabetes by making a few adjustments to their lifestyle. Heres a peek at her answers for some of the most common questions she is asked on the subject. A woman who has never had diabetes before but experiences high blood glucose (sugar) levels while pregnant is considered to have gestational diabetes. It occurs in up to 10 percent of American pregnancies and typically doesnt manifest until the tail end of the second trimester (between 24 and 28 weeks). Around week 24 into pregnancy, your health care provider will administer a screening gl Continue reading >>

Postprandial Glycemic Control During Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy Predicts The Risk Of Recurrence

Postprandial Glycemic Control During Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy Predicts The Risk Of Recurrence

Postprandial glycemic control during gestational diabetes pregnancy predicts the risk of recurrence Scientific Reportsvolume8, Articlenumber:6350 (2018) | Download Citation In this study we aimed to explore the significance of glycemic control during gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnancy in predicting recurrence as this is unknown. A retrospective population-based cohort study of women with first diagnosed GDM pregnancy was conducted. A total of 426 women with 4,226 glucose charts were obtained. Daily glucose values were collected from the glucose charts. Non-parametric (LOWESS) regression was used to present the glucose measurements along the gestational weeks. The analyses revealed that the 2-hour postprandial levels among women with GDM recurrence were substantially higher throughout gestation (PR = 1.89 [95% CI: 1.33, 2.73] for every 20 mg/dl increase). In a multivariable log-binomial regression, the mean postprandial glucose was significantly associated with GDM recurrence (p = 0.017) after adjusting for maternal age, family history of diabetes, insulin use, and inter-pregnancy interval (PR = 1.04 [95% CI: 1.01, 1.07]). The study conclusion is that tighter postprandial glycemic control should be considered. Future studies should explore tighter cutoffs of the 2-hour postprandial glucose. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk for a variety of adverse birth outcomes 1 , 2 , 3 . In addition, GDM is also a significant predictor for type 2 diabetes 4 . After pregnancy, 5% to 10% of women with GDM are found to have type 2 diabetes, and women with GDM have a 20% to 50% probability of developing diabetes within 5 to 10 years following GDM pregnancy 5 . About 50% of the women with GDM will have recurrent GDM at their consecu Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy - Gestational Diabetes Logbook And Manager 4+

Diabetes In Pregnancy - Gestational Diabetes Logbook And Manager 4+

The app has places to record the food you are eating, glucose, exercise, and weight. But, as others have said, I'm shocked by how many foods aren't listed. A nice addition would be the ability to scan food products, and have it upload nutrition info from there (as I know other apps can do). Also when I try to go into 'recent foods', it seems to crash the app. It does the job, but so many ways it could be better. Ok, expected more with the price of the App The app does track certain things, e.g., glucose level and food. However, would have given a better rating if it had more food choices (it doesn't even have some popular food brands such as Chobani and some common restaurants) which must enter manually. For the price of the app, I was expecting more and it does crash more often than I expected. Ok, expected more with the price of the App The app does track certain things, e.g., glucose level and food. However, would have given a better rating if it had more food choices (it doesn't even have some popular food brands such as Chobani and some common restaurants) which must enter manually. For the price of the app, I was expecting more and it does crash more often than I expected. A lot to be desired- especially for the price I read the negative reviews- but still couldn't find another app that tracked food and glucose. I concur with other reviews that the price is a lot considering the limitations with the food list and not friendly way to add food. With that said- in trying to log mozzarella, I couldn't find it until I scrolled through every cheese and found that it is misspelled - mozarella!!! Seriously? $6 for this? A lot to be desired- especially for the price I read the negative reviews- but still couldn't find another app that tracked food and glucose. I concur wi Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I had gestational diabetes with both of my pregancies. I know it isn't easy but you definetly need to watch what you eat and exercise. I was not put on insulin this last pregnancy I was put on a pill that I took in the morning before I ate and ended up having to take one at night to. The doctors main concern is when you have the baby, they could have problems with their sugar. My daughter came out and ended up her sugar dropped and she couldn't come out of the nursery until it was stable. With both of my pregnancies I wasn't able to see my baby until 24 hrs. My son ended up having fluid on his lungs, and my daughter had issues with her sugar. Try your best on watching what you eat and try and exercise. Another issue is the babies weight. My son was 10 lbs 6 oz, my daughter was only 8lbs 10oz. Not trying to worry you but big babies can happen especailly with gestational diabetes. Good Luck. I have Type 1 Diabetes, I am 23 weeks pregnant and I don't know if anyone has told you this...but the pancreas makes insulin and it is a hormone that you need to keep your blood sugar normal. When you are pregnant your body requires more insulin to preform the body functions. The amount of insulin you need changes up until you are about 36 weeks pregnant and then it just evens out again. They have no idea why but it just happens. I don't know if it is the same way for Gestational Diabetes, but i just thought you might want to know this information if it is the same. But you also should know that any white breads will raise your sugar and same with sweat things. Not to mention that salty foods can actually make you feel like you are having a high blood sugar but it is just the need to drink a ton more water. Because of the diabetes you will need like twice as much water as you would if Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Two Gestational Diabetes Management Apps For Patients

Comparison Of Two Gestational Diabetes Management Apps For Patients

Comparison of two gestational diabetes management apps for patients To explore the usability and applicability of two gestational diabetes management apps for patients. The apps are Gestational Diabetes Manager and Diabetes in Pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is a common problem in pregnancy. Ideal management to decrease its risks requires high levels of patient involvement, especially if insulin is involved. Glucose meters track glucose levels, but not if the reading is before or after a meal. In order to be helpful, the meter also has to be available at the time of her appointment where the information can be downloaded for assessment. The Gestational Diabetes Manager and the Diabetes in Pregnancy (DNP) apps offer an adjunct for tracking and sharing glucose measurements and other important diabetes management data. #1 Gestational Diabetes Manager available for the iPhone ,$2.99 The home screen of the Gestational Diabetes Manager offers several options. On first use, the user can input her height, weight, due date, recommended caloric intake, and even her doctors email address. This section can be updated as needed from the home screen. The log section allows the user to log various data: meals, blood glucose, ketones, water, and exercise. In the final section of the app, the user can see a report-type display of all logged data. The report can also be sent to the patients physician as a .CSV file via email (not encrypted). Patient can specify what type of read (premeal, postmeal, fasting) Ability to email report to health care provider Weeks pregnant presented are subtracted from due date, rather than from last menstrual period Inability to correct inaccurately recorded data Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Whether you had diabetes before you got pregnant or you developed diabetes during your pregnancy, you'll need to keep a close eye on your blood sugar levels. Tight control will help you avoid complications and long-term health problems for both you and your baby. You're eating differently because your body needs more energy to help your baby grow and be healthy. And your changing hormones affect how your body makes and uses insulin. In the later parts of your pregnancy, you may become more insulin resistant, so blood sugar builds up to higher levels. How often should you check your blood sugar? Pre-existing diabetes: Before and after meals and before bedtime If you are pregnant and have type 1 diabetes, your doctor might sometimes ask you to check your blood sugar in the middle of the night, around 3 a.m. You should check your fasting urine ketones every day, too. For every type of diabetes, if you're pregant you need to see your doctor at least once a month, perhaps as often as once a week. Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

INTRODUCTION Insulin is a hormone whose job is to enable glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream to enter the cells of the body, where sugar is the source of energy. All fetuses (babies) and placentas (afterbirths) produce hormones that make the mother resistant to her own insulin. Most pregnant women produce more insulin to compensate and keep their blood sugar level normal. Some pregnant women cannot produce enough extra insulin and their blood sugar level rises, a condition called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects between 5 and 18 percent of women during pregnancy, and usually goes away after delivery. It is important to recognize and treat gestational diabetes to minimize the risk of complications to mother and baby. In addition, it is important for women with a history of gestational diabetes to be tested for diabetes after pregnancy because of an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the years following delivery. More detailed information about gestational diabetes is available by subscription. (See "Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy: Screening and diagnosis".) GESTATIONAL DIABETES TESTING We recommend that all pregnant women be tested for gestational diabetes. Identifying and treating gestational diabetes can reduce the risk of pregnancy complications. (See "Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy: Screening and diagnosis".) Complications of gestational diabetes can include: Having a large baby (weighing more than 9 lbs or 4.1 kg), which can increase the risk of injury to the mother or baby during delivery and increase the chance of needing a cesarean section. Stillbirth (a baby who dies before being born), a complication which fortunately is now rare in women with gestational diabetes because of good control of blood sugars and careful monitoring of mo Continue reading >>

Overview Of Gestational Diabetes

Overview Of Gestational Diabetes

As any pregnant woman can attest, her body undergoes many changes throughout pregnancy, especially hormonal changes. Some of these hormones, like insulin, control the processing of food and the providing of nutrients to the unborn child. As such, some women may develop gestational diabetes, which impacts how the insulin hormone controls the transfer of glucose, or sugar, from the bloodstream into other cells in your body. Gestational diabetes impacts both mother and baby. In many cases, gestational diabetes goes away following birth; however, while the condition is present, it is important to manage the condition to mitigate health risk and to ensure that both mother and baby live the healthiest lives possible. Cause Pregnancy can put additional stress on your hormones. This makes it harder for the body’s insulin hormone to move glucose, which provides energy, from blood into the cells. This depleted use of insulin is often called insulin resistance. When the body isn’t able to compensate for the presence of insulin resistance by producing more insulin, a woman can develop gestational diabetes. Concerns When gestational diabetes is left untreated, it can cause: Premature or still birth. Unusual prenatal development, including respiratory complications. Problems during delivery. A greater likelihood that you or your child will develop diabetes later in life. Diagnosis and Testing Testing for gestational diabetes occurs between the 24th an 28th week of pregnancy. For the screening, women are asked to drink a sugary glucose solution. One hour after consumption of the solution, a caregiver will test a woman's blood sugar level to see how her body has processed the glucose. Depending on the results of this initial screening, a woman may be asked to do an additional gluco Continue reading >>

Vanderbilt Diabetes Center Gestational Program

Vanderbilt Diabetes Center Gestational Program

Dr. Jagasia has been at Vanderbilt since 1998. After completing her fellowship at Vanderbilt, she joined the endocrinology faculty in 2000. She is an expert in gestational diabetes as well as other endocrine diseases in pregnancy. She established the GDM clinic in 2000, which now receives referrals from obstetricians and midwives at Vanderbilt and also several other hospitals. Dr. Jagasia is also the Associate Program Director of the Endocrinology fellowship program at Vanderbilt. Patricia Patterson has been a registered nurse since 1988. She has been a certified diabetes educator since 1995. She offers diabetes education in the Vanderbilt Eskind Diabetes Clinic. Patricia has worked with Dr. Jagasia and the Gestational Diabetes Clinic to educate and manage blood sugar in pregnant women since 2005. She teaches patients on many aspects of diabetes care. Jennifer Garland is a registered dietitian and a certified diabetes educator. She received her Masters in Public Health from the University of Utah. She has been working with patients with gestational diabetes since 2000, and has been a certified diabetes educator since 2004. She enjoys working with clients and watching them lead healthier lives. New patients can expect detailed GDM education at the first visit. You'll meet with a doctor, dietitian and diabetes educator to learn about treatment, diet and diabetes care. You'll learn how to test your blood glucose, record the results and send them back to us regularly. You can expect diet advice tailored to your needs. Our dietitian will work with you to make a healthy eating plan that fits your lifestyle and help you reach your blood glucose goals. We will work with your obstetrician to care for you and monitor your health. After delivery, you will be tested to see if you' Continue reading >>

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