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Gestational Diabetes Ice Cream

Managing My Prediabetes With Kale And Ice Cream

Managing My Prediabetes With Kale And Ice Cream

In my last blog post, I discussed how I was back on the healthy food and exercise wagon as a result of feeling jittery with too much sugar, participating in new and fun exercise routines with friends and fear of potential amputation and death from full on diabetes if I didn’t get my act together. The new question is this: How will I maintain this healthy lifestyle and be as strict with it as possible? Well, since this prediabetes journey began, I believe I have learned one lesson for sure; Perfect is the enemy of the good. You see, for those of us who already eat healthy, exercise and are of a healthy weight (like me), we may have to cut ourselves some slack and know that it is not always realistic to eat a carb free, paleo diet or exercise 6 times a week. Failing to do that does not mean we are going to fall sick and die. The truth is that even people who could do better in the food, exercise and weight department need to cut themselves some slack and do the best they can. At least that’s my opinion. It is very rare to find someone who can give up all treats and exercise daily. If those people exist—and I have met a few! — more power to them. For the rest of us mere mortals, or at least for me, I have come to the realization that we simply need to do the best that we can, forgive ourselves when we don’t, and get back up on the horse tomorrow or even right after we indulge. Here are a few more strategies that have worked for me: ALWAYS have healthy snacks (hard boiled eggs, cut up veggies, etc.) readily available in the front of your fridge and cabinet that you do indeed enjoy. This will prevent impulse snacking on garbage. ALWAYS eat before a social event where you suspect there may not be healthy food or have an emergency supply of healthy snacks in your bag Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

Questions About Gestational Diabetes

Questions About Gestational Diabetes

Hi there. I'm kind of curious about some of your rules - I also have GD and have to test 4 times a day and have to count carbs, but I am allowed fruit and sugar if it fits into my plan. Also, nothing about dairy was ever mentioned to me. In fact, my dietitian recommended I eat a cup of full fat ice cream every night before bed. I'm wondering why they are being so strict with you. I was worried about losing weight also. The first week I lost a pound but I put it back on the second week. Since then I have gained a pound a week and my doctor is happy with that. I've been doing the diet for going on 2 months. If you were normal weight and not eating out of control, I don't think losing weight will be an issue. You just might gain slower. I have found that I have to eat MORE than I want to. Pregnancy has killed my appetite and I have lost 14 pounds overall. I gained 5 with the first week of GD, but that was while making myself actually sick from forcing so much food into me to get 60g of carbs at every meal, but those 5 pounds were gone two weeks later. Then I was told I could go down to 45g, which has been better. No restrictions on sugar, fat, etc. Just looking at carbs. You get 60 carbs at every meal??I only get 45, and that's max and seems to raise my blood sugar to over the recommended limit of 135 after a meal. Hmm...sounds like different doctors are allowing different things- less of a science and more of an opinion? Yeah, it was really shocking for me to find out just how much I need to eat! My first meal of the day needs to be 15-30 though, and I've found that the lower the better since that's my body's worst time, it seems. For my second meal today I had 49g and my number about 40 minutes after eating was only 96 (we had to go somewhere and I wanted to see how it Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes / Ice-cream

Gestational Diabetes / Ice-cream

Hi ladies I have gestational diabetes and my bloods are mostly good, I really want to treat myself today tho, I'm craving some Ben and jerrys ice-cream. Is it really bad if i do have it just this once? I feel bad but I so need a treat right now.. If you must have ice cream I would recommend skinny cow ice cream it doesn't taste to bad and has not affected my testing I was also diagnosed with GD and all my readings so far have been low (my GTT fasting level was 0.1 over the limit!). I've been treating myself to some weis mango sorbet every evening and it hasn't made a difference to my levels. Not sure about Ben & jerrys though, maybe if you have a scoop of it just to get the craving to go away. I find with cravings they just don't go away until you give in! Eat the ice cream and then go for a walk afterwards. I have been been eating like I don't have GD (naughty!) and as long I am active afterwards, stand up, put things away, wash dishes etc I am generally ok! If your readings are generally good, then experiment a bit until you know your limits otherwise the rest of the pregnancy is going to be torture. Go for it. Just don't over do it (eating the whole tub )! I have GD too and I had some chocolate a couple times this week and generally my sugars are normally ok with about half my fasting ones being a couple 0.1 points higher than recommended. I would suggest having the ice cream as a snack in the evening after having taken your last reading for the day. My dietician said we can eat anything within reason just consider how much and when. Ie Don't have a treat at the same time as having a meal with lots of carbs :) I've been eating banana paddle pops and fandangles throughout My readings have not gone over at all. I'm always naughty and eat chocolate and ice cream, get u Continue reading >>

Ice Cream Is Good For You (with 7 Caveats)

Ice Cream Is Good For You (with 7 Caveats)

Ice cream is good for you (with 7 caveats) Health-conscious adults dont have to forgo frozen treats SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) As a summer treat, ice cream is hard to beat. But it also can be a vehicle for unhealthful fat and calories if you don't watch the quality and quantity of what you consume. Fortunately, many manufacturers have been churning out lighter fare that offers lower fat and fewer calories per serving without sacrificing much of the taste and texture that make ice cream so appealing. And alternatives such as frozen yogurt, sorbet, water ice, fruit bars and sherbet can bridge the gap for people determined not to pass up the simple pleasure of frozen treats. Some families are forgoing pricey student loans in favor of alternative strategies. Photo: AP. For many, ice cream is as American as apple pie and baseball. In 1984, President Ronald Reagan declared July National Ice Cream month and designated the third Sunday of the month National Ice Cream Day. Visiting the local ice cream parlor is "very much a part of the American tradition," said Mary Leopold, co-owner of 92-year-old Leopold's Ice Cream in Savannah, Ga. "It's an experience that's multigenerational to this day. "Even in this economy that has hit so hard, it's a way that people can still feel like they can have something special," she said. Of course, as with any dessert, few people can afford to indulge in ice cream frequently without giving some thought to weight and overall health management. The alternatives may not be better for you People who have diabetes should count total carbohydrates and be careful when substituting fruity frozen treats for ice cream, said Melissa Joy Dobbins, a registered dietician in Chicago and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. That's because many sh Continue reading >>

Ice Cream, Ice Lollies & Frozen Yoghurt

Ice Cream, Ice Lollies & Frozen Yoghurt

With the first glimpses of some sunshine last weekend, we've seen a few ladies asking about ice cream & ice lollies in our Facebook support group and so whilst this was on my list of posts coming soon, I've brought it forward for all you eager ladies that are craving ice cream and let's face it, who cares what the weather is doing, we love ice cream! So can we eat ice cream, ice lollies and frozen yoghurt with gestational diabetes? Here we'll share hints & tips and our best finds... Diabetic & sugar free ice cream Diabetic or sugar free ice cream is often the first thing ladies turn to with gestational diabetes. There are lots of these 'diabetic' ice creams on the market, some like Frank's are widely available in many supermarkets and it's common to see diabetic ice creams in independent ice cream parlours. These ice creams are fine to eat with gestational diabetes but you shouldn't have to pay more for these 'diabetic' products and should be aware of the ingredients used. Diabetic ice creams often contain high amounts of artificial sweeteners (sometimes listed as polyols or sugar alcohols) which may cause gastric upsets, bloating, cramps, wind and diarrhoea. Sorbitol and mannitol can be the main culprit for causing gastric upset, but some people struggle with other sweeteners causing gastric upsets too. Natural sweeteners are often better tolerated than artificial. Diabetic ice creams can sometimes have a funny after taste or texture too, so whilst they shouldn't send your blood sugar levels soaring, you may find alternatives which suit you better. That said, sometimes it's just enough to take the ice cream craving away when you're walking along the beach! 99, Mr Whippy & Mcfluffy (soft serve ice cream) It is up to you to decide if you think it is safe to eat this type Continue reading >>

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/Primal for My Gestational Diabetes Ive been interested in Paleolithic (or paleo) diets for ages, but it always seemed difficult to give up my favorite croissants and ciabatta bread and fully embrace the lifestyle. Plus, I have a wheat-addicted daughter and husband to deal with.Ive tried removing wheat from the house from time to time, but it usually results in some sort of mutiny and my dear hubby making panicked runs to Costco for massive packs of apple turnovers. I found him hiding some in his car last year and decided I may have been a wee bit extreme in my war on gluten. However, I got a wake up call last year when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD) fairly early on in my recent pregnancy with our twins. Gestational diabetes is much more common with twin pregnancies, but the diagnosis upset me. It seemed that getting a diagnosis of gestational diabetes triggered the five stages of grief! My first step was definitely denial: How could I possibly have gestational diabetes? I eat very healthy foods overall (well at least according to conventional holistic nutrition)plenty of healthy whole grains, beans, legumes, organic vegetables, fruit, grass-fed beef, and organic chicken. Oh, and wild salmon of courseI do live in the Pacific Northwest!I also love my dark chocolate , but Im more likely to make glucomannan pudding than cupcakes. (Okay, sometimes we have cupcakes.) I was tested for gestational diabetes earlier in my pregnancy than most because of my symptoms (hyperemesis gravidarum, constant thirst, and needing to pee even more than the average pregnant woman) and the high risk of GD with twins. My test results were marginal, and it was still early, so, convinced this was all a giant mistake, I started monitoring my blood sugars four times Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Oh Joy! : Archives

Oh Joy! : Archives

I'm not gonna lie guys, being pregnant can be really unfun. I do like being pregnant most of the time...I love the feeling of a growing baby inside your belly, people are really extra nice to you, Bob will never say no to my request for a back massage, and of course, the prize you get at the end is awesome. I like being pregnant maybe 75% of the time, but the other 25% of the time, it just kind of sucks. I run out of breath really quickly, I have trouble sleeping, I've peed in my pants more times than I'd like to admit, and my body eventually just can't keep up. When I was pregnant with Ruby, I developed gallstones and had to have my gallbladder removed soon after she was born. And yesterday, I found out that I have gestational diabetes. Which means little to no carbs and no sugar until this baby comes out. To a person whose day is based around what I'll have for dessert, it was a pretty sad thing to hear. So, here I am all-of-a-sudden having to go on a diet, while pregnantthe one time your body wants just a little bit more to eat and needs a little bit more energy to get you through the day. Yes, I am super bummed. But I know it's for my own health and the health of our baby and that I have to get on track with this new plan even if it wasn't part of the old plan. So, friends, if you have any amazing protein-based, veggie-based food or recipe suggestions for me, I am all ears. Or if you've had gestational diabetes before and have any tips for me, I need all the help I can get! {Photo by Bob Cho. I tried to find a photo of me with a "thumbs down" but had no luck.} Continue reading >>

Having Gestational Diabetes And Being Pregnant

Having Gestational Diabetes And Being Pregnant

Important Things Ive Learned about Eating for Two with GestationalDiabetes The views expressed in this post are those of a Spoke contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of Red Tricycle. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes, sometimes known as GD, occurs when a pregnant womans blood sugar rises dangerously high. The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin which controls blood sugar within a normal range, but during pregnancy, hormones produced by the placenta can in some cases render insufficient insulin, leading to gestational diabetes. Its important that GD is recognized and treated quickly because of the health implications for both mother and baby. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) suggests that all expectant women who dont already have diabetes be tested for gestational diabetes between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. One of the more common ways to determine if a woman has GD is to submit to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). You should schedule the test in the morning as you have to take it on an empty stomach. When you arrive at your doctors office or lab, you will be provided with a special solution drink containing 75 grams of sugar (glucose). A blood sample will be taken 1 and then 2 hours after you drink the solution to determine if your blood sugar is in fact considered high. Does gestational diabetes affect the baby? Women with GD who receive appropriate care usually go on to deliver healthy babies . However, if you have continuously high blood glucose levels all through pregnancy, the fetus will also have increased blood glucose levels. High blood glucose can result in a larger than normal fetus, possibly making the birth more problematical . The baby also faces the risk for having neonatal hypoglycemia ( Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

The other day, after a casual dinner at home, my wife and I went out for ice cream. We'd opted to leave the air-conditioned safety of our home on this 90+ degree day, to head for an ice cream parlor that's just a short stroll from our house. As we stood there pondering the particular ice cream creations that sounded best, I glanced at my Dexcom CGM to see where my blood sugar happened to be and what that would mean for my carb counting and insulin dosing. Seeing a 97 mg/dL on my receiver, I smiled and rattled off the number to my wife who had already moved toward the counter to tell the clerk her decision. I rarely deviate from choosing either a plain scoop of vanilla, or an 'unfancy' single-scoop hot fudge sundae. But in this moment, I decided to go with a single scoop of rocky road, full of chocolatey goodness and riddled with marshmallows and nuts. I was treating myself, after all. A woman nearby had apparently overheard the first part of our conversation and realized I was talking about diabetes. She shot me a look before saying, "You can't eat that!" Without more than a second's hesitation, I shot back a quick, decisive response: "Yes, I can!" That started a back and forth that I would have preferred to avoid, about how this woman was nosing in on a private matter that didn't concern her -- one that she also had no personal insight into and no context as to who I was or how I was managing my diabetes and this particular food choice. It wasn't any of her business in the first place of course, but still she insisted that she knows a lot about diabetes and what PWDs can or cannot eat, since she has family members who happen to live with it. (((sigh))) We in the Diabetes Community know this type of person well. They're referred to as the Diabetes Police, who think they Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Made Me A Better Mom

Gestational Diabetes Made Me A Better Mom

Gestational Diabetes Made Me a Better Mom Diabetes gets a bad rap and deserves it, but gestational diabetes actually changed me for the better. I had this diagnosis with all three of my children. It was a hard pill to swallow during my first pregnancy, but one I readily accepted with my next two because gestational diabetes taught me a lot about myself, my health, and the kind of mom I wanted to be for my kiddos. I wasnt all that worried when I flunked the one-hour glucose test during my first pregnancy. I had eaten a large bowl of ice cream the night before after polishing off some Mexican food with my in-laws. I fasted correctly for my three-hour test, but hung a lot of my hopes on the claim that the majority of women fail the one-hour test and do fine on the three-hour test. When the nurse called me at home, I cried because it just did not seem fair. Self-pity took over for the rest of the day. I had already had two miscarriages prior to this pregnancy, which made me feel like I was owed a perfect nine months of getting fat and feeling comfortable baby kicks. I wanted to eat pancakes for a mid-afternoon snack and have milk shakes at every meal. After a sleepless night, I did some on-line research. It was comforting to hear that a lot of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. And like most things, women can handle it. I visited a diabetic counselor the next week, and we worked on a food plan. She explained that patients rarely need insulin if they follow the diabetic guidelines about portion control and making good food choices. It seemed pretty straightforward and, lucky for me, I had my husband on hand to listen to the medical advice. I got a monitor, testing strips, and some pen needles to check my blood sugar four times a day. That evening, I had my first Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Sweets You Can Have

Gestational Diabetes: Sweets You Can Have

Having gestational diabetes during your pregnancy is not a fun thing! You already have all the worries of a pregnancy and stressing out about getting things ready for the baby, now you have to deal with this too? If you have gestional diabetes, I want to share my story with you as well as giving you some tips on how to sneak in some good sweets without breaking the rules! When I was pregnant with my second baby, I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at about 28 weeks. I was not happy when this day came because it was the start of three months of watching your health very closely. Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy in a person who did not have diabetes before pregnancy. The pancreas does not produce enough insulin to combat the glucose in your body. You can ask your doctor about the science behind it, I just want to share what I had to go through and let you know what to look out for. For the next three months, everyday, I had to test myself on what my blood sugar levels were 7 times a day: before and after each meal and before bedtime snack. Yes, I had to prick my finger and draw blood 7 times a day. On top of that, I had to get checked every two weeks from the gestional diabetes clinic. I had to record all my blood sugar levels, what insulin I had taken, and record all the food I ate, six times a day. My days seem to be a drag and I was not enjoying myself! The only way I can feel any remote happiness in this process was finding out what sweets I can have. SWEET foods like ice cream, chocolate, and desserts! I was craving sweets like crazy, like with both pregnancies but this one was worse since I wasn’t allowed to have any sweets. During one of my clinic visits, I asked the dietitian what I can do about my cravings for chocol Continue reading >>

Eating Ice Cream In Pregnancy Benefits, Risks & Myths

Eating Ice Cream In Pregnancy Benefits, Risks & Myths

Pregnancy demands utmost care in ones food and lifestyle choices. However, it is essential to provide adequate nutrition to the expecting mother along with fulfilling her cravings. Pregnant women often experience food cravings, especially for sweets, chocolates and ice-creams. Ice creams are sweetened frozen desserts usually made of dairy products with fruits or flavours added. Ice creams are a sinful delicacy loved and enjoyed by most. But a common question iscan pregnant women eat ice cream? The answer is YES. A pregnant woman can consume ice creams, with basic care and attention to factors of hygiene, history of allergy, and medical issues related to cold, diabetes and obesity . As long as you keep these precautions in mind and do not deprive yourself of the essential nutrients, you can safely give in to these cravings once in a while. Although ice creams are less of a nutritional foodstuff and more of an indulgent product, yet there are subtle supplies of essential nutrients like calcium, vitamins and minerals that can be obtained from ice creams. A 100 gm serving of vanilla ice cream has 47% fat, of which 70% is saturated or undesirable fat, almost 42% carbohydrates and about 6-7% proteins as its major constituents. Calorie-wise, a typical 100 g scoop delivers 207 calories. Lately, ice creams have healthier versions, with low fat, sugar-free and yogurt-based light ice creams made available. Besides, ice creams also provide vitamins like Vitamin A and Vitamin B12 in moderate amounts. The body gets about 20% RDA of phosphorus and 17% of essential calcium from a 100 g scoop, both of which are important for healthy bones, joints, other musculoskeletal tissues and the proper functioning of the heart. How Much Ice Cream Should a Pregnant Women Eat in a Day? Ice creams a Continue reading >>

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Snacks are a really important part of the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet for several reasons. Simply put, eating regularly will generally help keep your glucose levels tracking smoother. And including a snack between your meals also makes it less likely that you’ll get super hungry. Have you noticed that once you’re hungry it’s much harder to try to control your food intake? The key to a successful GDM diet is ensuring that you’re having a consistent amount of carbs. Snacks are also a good time to fit in your fruit and dairy requirements that you may no longer be able to eat together with your main meal. And often small and frequent intake also helps with other common problems in pregnancy such as nausea and heartburn/reflux. If you’re working or at home with little kids or just aren’t used to including mid-meal snacks, it’s often hard to adjust to this. So planning and preparation is the key! When you’re out and about you’ll probably find it challenging to find something that is both the right amount of carbs and not too high in fat, but also nutritious. So it pays to have a selection of suitable options on hand and variety will help too. I’ve put together this extensive list of suggestions. Your dietitian can help you work out whether you should eat some of these in combination to ensure you’re eating the recommended amounts both in terms of carbohydrate amount but also overall food group and nutrient amounts. Please note, the majority of these products are Australian. Dairy 1 carb snacks (where 1 carbohydrate serve = 15 grams of total carbohydrate) (Always check the product’s nutritional panel for exact info) Cup of low fat/soy milk (if you’d like s Continue reading >>

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