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Gestational Diabetes How High Is Too High

Is Gestational Diabetes Serious?

Is Gestational Diabetes Serious?

Basically, gestational diabetes, or high blood sugar during pregnancy, can cause the baby to grow larger than it would’ve been otherwise, which may cause complications such as an unexpected c-section. If gestational diabetes is present, we want to know about it because we can take steps to monitor blood sugar and make dietary and lifestyle changes. We’d have women watch their blood sugar, and control how much carbohydrate and sugar they’re eating, to keep blood sugar in control and the baby at a healthy weight. Yes, it is serious. Gestational diabetes needs to be treated for the health of mother and child. Most women are treated with diet and possibly insulin. High glucose levels are not healthy for the fetus and can contribute to a number of problems such as early delivery of an immature baby. Women who have gestational diabetes are at a much higher risk of developing diabetes later in life. Gestational Diabetes is an endocrine disorder that is seen in females during pregnancy. It usually does not present itself until later in the pregnancy. It is caused by the hormones produced in the placenta during pregnancy. These hormones affect the maternal body’s ability to use insulin. This causes the mother’s blood sugars to elevate. The effect of these elevated blood sugars can cause health problems in the fetus. Babies born to mothers with Gestational diabetes are larger, sometimes exceeding 10 pounds. They may experience respiratory distress syndrome after birth as well as hypoglycemia (low blood sugars). And babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes have increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. Mothers at risk of gestational diabetes are typically older than 25 years of age at time of pregnancy, overweight or obese, have a family or pers Continue reading >>

Pregnancy: High-normal Blood Sugar Risky

Pregnancy: High-normal Blood Sugar Risky

May 7, 2008 -- Babies born to women with even slightly higher-than-normal blood sugar levels are at increased risk for a range of pregnancy and delivery-related complications, findings from an international study confirm. The large study examined the risks associated with having elevated blood sugar during pregnancy that is not high enough to be considered gestational diabetes. More than 25,000 pregnant women from nine countries took part in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study, which appears in the May 8 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine and was largely funded by the National Institutes of Health. Even a small rise in blood sugar above what is considered normal was associated with an increase in adverse outcomes, including high birth weight, C-section delivery, and preeclampsia, a complication that can lead to premature birth and can be deadly if not treated. The findings make it clear that elevated blood sugar has a direct negative impact on pregnancy and delivery, study co-author Donald R. Coustan, MD, tells WebMD. Coustan is professor and chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Brown University Medical School. "This lays to rest many of the criticisms about gestational diabetes treatment," Coustan says. "The critics have said that it isn't elevated glucose that leads to negative outcomes, it is obesity or maternal age or some other risk factor. But we were able to control for these risk factors, and glucose was still a major determinant of outcomes." Who Should Be Treated? One important question that remains unanswered is whether the threshold for treating high blood sugar in pregnancy should be lowered and if so, by how much. "Because there was a continuous relationship that was even seen in women with glucose levels considered n Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is a medical condition that causes high blood glucose (blood sugar). When there is too much sugar in the blood, it can cause health problems. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body regulate glucose levels in the blood. When there isn’t enough insulin or the body can’t use it properly, blood sugar levels can get too high. Diabetes that develops during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. It can cause health problems for both the mother and her developing baby during the pregnancy, and it may cause problems after birth. For example, when a mother’s blood sugar levels are too high, the baby's development may be delayed. The baby could also grow very large, which may make a C-section delivery necessary. All pregnant women will be tested for gestational diabetes at some point during the pregnancy. If mothers have risk factors, like age or weight problems, being pregnant with multiples, significant family history of diabetes or having gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, they may be tested earlier and more often than women without additional risk factors. Diagnosing gestational diabetes All pregnant women will be screened for gestational diabetes. Most health care providers recommend a glucose screening test between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. When women have risk factors for gestational diabetes, the test may be done in the first trimester. If this test shows an increased blood sugar level, a three-hour glucose tolerance test may be done after a few days of following a special diet. If results of the second test are in the abnormal range, gestational diabetes is diagnosed. Once diagnosed, your doctor will likely recommend counseling that shows you how to eat properly and test your own blood sugar up to fo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

Info Gestational Diabetes

Info Gestational Diabetes

What is Gestational Diabetes? In order to understand gestational diabetes, it is necessary to understand how insulin works. The hormone insulin which comes from the pancreas controls blood sugar. The role of insulin is to get the sugar into the cells. If for any reason the insulin is not working properly or there is not enough of it, the blood sugar will rise and if it rises high enough we call it diabetes. The difference between diabetes and gestational diabetes is that diabetes simply means your blood sugar is too high whereas gestational diabetes is any diabetes that arises or is first identified during pregnancy. During pregnancy the afterbirth or placenta releases hormones that circulate through your body. These hormones block how the insulin works and thus raise the blood sugar the purpose being to provide energy for the baby. Therefore, even in a normal pregnancy the pancreas has to make a lot of extra insulin just to keep the situation controlled. When the pancreas is not making enough insulin to overcome the blockage from these hormones, the blood sugar will rise, and this is called gestational diabetes. What causes it? The main problem is a mother’s pancreas not able to make enough insulin. There is a resistance to the insulin being made caused by the placental hormones but a normal pancreas can usually make enough insulin to overcome this insulin resistance. If the pancreas does not make the extra insulin, the sugar will rise and gestational diabetes occurs. What are the risk factors? The mothers weight can be a factor. If cells are swollen with fat owing to weight problems prior to pregnancy or if during the pregnancy excess weight is gained, it is more difficult for the insulin to get sugar into the cells. You are expected to gain weight in pregnancy, jus Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Topic Overview What is gestational diabetes? If your blood sugar level first becomes too high when you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. It usually goes back to normal after the baby is born. High blood sugar can cause problems for you and your baby. Your baby may grow too large, which can cause problems during delivery. Your baby may also be born with low blood sugar. But with treatment, most women who have gestational diabetes are able to control their blood sugar and give birth to healthy babies. Women who have had gestational diabetes are more likely than other women to develop type 2 diabetes later on. You may be able to prevent or reduce the severity of type 2 diabetes by staying at a healthy weight, eating healthy foods, and increasing your physical activity. What causes gestational diabetes? The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body properly use and store the sugar from the food you eat. This keeps your blood sugar level in a target range. When you are pregnant, the placenta makes hormones that can make it harder for insulin to work. This is called insulin resistance. A pregnant woman can get diabetes when her pancreas cannot make enough insulin to keep her blood sugar levels within a target range. What are the symptoms? Because gestational diabetes may not cause symptoms, it is important for you to be tested for gestational diabetes. Sometimes a pregnant woman who has symptoms has been living with another type of diabetes without knowing it. If you have symptoms from another type of diabetes, they may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Increased hunger. Blurred vision. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel more hungry. So having these symptoms doesn't always mean that a woman has diabete Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Topic Overview What is gestational diabetes? If your blood sugar level first becomes too high when you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. It usually goes back to normal after the baby is born. High blood sugar can cause problems for you and your baby. Your baby may grow too large, which can cause problems during delivery. Your baby may also be born with low blood sugar. But with treatment, most women who have gestational diabetes are able to control their blood sugar and give birth to healthy babies. Women who have had gestational diabetes are more likely than other women to develop type 2 diabetes later on. You may be able to prevent or reduce the severity of type 2 diabetes by staying at a healthy weight, eating healthy foods, and increasing your physical activity. What causes gestational diabetes? The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body properly use and store the sugar from the food you eat. This keeps your blood sugar level in a target range. When you are pregnant, the placenta makes hormones that can make it harder for insulin to work. This is called insulin resistance. A pregnant woman can get diabetes when her pancreas cannot make enough insulin to keep her blood sugar levels within a target range. What are the symptoms? Because gestational diabetes may not cause symptoms, it is important for you to be tested for gestational diabetes. Sometimes a pregnant woman who has symptoms has been living with another type of diabetes without knowing it. If you have symptoms from another type of diabetes, they may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Increased hunger. Blurred vision. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel more hungry. So having these symptoms doesn't always mean that a woman has diabete Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Copyright © 1998 [email protected] All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your health provider. This particular web section is designed to help present some ideas for coping with/preventing higher readings. It should be re-emphasized that nothing herein should be considered medical advice. Contents What to Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What If You Just Have a High Reading, Without Any Real Rhyme or Reason? What Then? What If My Fasting Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? What If My Post-Meal Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? Trouble-Shooting High Readings: Some Ideas What To Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What do you do if you get a higher reading than you are supposed to? First off, don't panic. There are any number of factors that can cause an incorrectly high reading, and you need to rule these out before confirming the high reading. Always re-test to confirm a high number! You need to know if there was an error of some kind. The very first thing you do if you get a high number is to go wash your hands thoroughly and then re-test. Any bits of food on your fingers can significantly affect your numbers. A residue of juice or a drop of fruit pulp on your hand could elevate your readings tremendously. Other substances on your hands might also possibly affect your readings, so washing your hands really well before doing a reading is very, very important. (Kmom's story: I had a couple of readings that were high; upon reflection I realized that I had been cutting up grapes for my toddler before the measurement and gotten busy and forgotten to wash my hands before testing. Wh Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood sugar levels are too high. Gestational diabetes is a form of the disease that occurs during pregnancy. 請點擊此轉換成中文 Haga clic aquí para ver esta página en español. High blood-sugar levels aren’t good for you or your baby. Untreated gestational diabetes may cause you to develop high blood pressure and can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes later on. Most women with gestational diabetes deliver healthy babies. However, when blood sugar isn’t properly controlled, it can result in a very large baby. The larger size can cause injury to your baby during delivery or could require preterm or cesarean delivery, or both. In addition, uncontrolled gestational diabetes can increase your baby’s risk of developing birth defects, high blood sugar, breathing problems and other conditions. Gestational diabetes can also increase the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes later in your child’s life. Although in most cases gestational diabetes goes away after you give birth, it’s important to get special care to control your blood sugar during pregnancy to protect you and your baby. Who's at Risk Anyone can get gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at greater risk of developing the condition if you: Have certain health conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome or prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be considered diabetes. Are overweight or have given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more. Have had gestational diabetes before or a have family member with type 2 diabetes. Are African American, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latina or Pacific Islander American. For most women, there aren’t any noticeable symptoms of ge Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What It Means For You And Your Baby

Gestational Diabetes: What It Means For You And Your Baby

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that starts during pregnancy. (The word gestational means “during pregnancy.”) If you have gestational diabetes, your body isn't able to use the sugar (glucose) in your blood as well as it should, so the level of sugar in your blood gets too high. Gestational diabetes affects about 3% of all pregnant women. It usually starts in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy (between the 24th and 28th weeks). This kind of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. How can gestational diabetes affect me and my baby? Your baby may grow somewhat larger than a typical baby. This can happen because the extra sugar in your blood “feeds” your baby more. If your baby is very large, you may have a more difficult delivery or need a cesarean section. Gestational diabetes can also cause some problems for your baby at birth, such as a low blood sugar level or jaundice (yellowish skin color). Neither of these problems is very serious. If your baby's blood sugar level is low, he or she will be given extra glucose (sugar water) to bring it back to normal. Jaundice is treated by putting the baby under special lights. Jaundice is common in many newborns and not just those born to mothers with gestational diabetes. What can I do if I have gestational diabetes? Your doctor will probably suggest a special diet for you and may want you to have your blood tested to monitor (check) the sugar level. He or she may also want you to ge Continue reading >>

Infant Of Diabetic Mother

Infant Of Diabetic Mother

Diabetes in pregnancy There are two types of diabetes that occur in pregnancy: Gestational diabetes. This term refers to a mother who does not have diabetes before becoming pregnant but develops a resistance to insulin because of the hormones of pregnancy. Pregestational diabetes. This term describes women who already have insulin-dependent diabetes and become pregnant. With both types of diabetes, there can be complications for the baby. It is very important to keep tight control of blood sugar during pregnancy. What causes diabetes in pregnancy? The placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. It also produces a variety of hormones to maintain the pregnancy. Some of these hormones (estrogen, cortisol, and human placental lactogen) can block insulin. This usually begins about 20 to 24 weeks into the pregnancy. As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced, and insulin resistance becomes greater. Normally, the pancreas is able to make additional insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but when the production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of the placental hormones, gestational diabetes results. Pregnancy also may change the insulin needs of a woman with preexisting diabetes. Insulin-dependent mothers may require more insulin as pregnancy progresses. Who is affected by diabetes in pregnancy? About 5 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetics make up the vast majority of pregnancies with diabetes. Some pregnant women require insulin to treat their diabetes. Why is diabetes in pregnancy a concern? The mother's excess amounts of blood glucose are transferred to the fetus during pregnancy. This causes the baby's body to secrete increased amounts of insulin, which result Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

A risk means there is a chance that something might happen. With every pregnancy there are some risks, but if you have gestational diabetes your risks of some things will be increased. Managing your blood sugar level brings these risks right down again though and most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These things are very unlikely to happen to you, but understanding the risks may help you see why it is important that you follow your healthcare team’s advice. The risks linked to gestational diabetes are caused by blood glucose levels being too high. If you can keep your blood glucose as close as possible to the ideal level, your risks will be reduced. Risk of having a large baby (macrosomia) If your blood glucose level is high, it can cause high blood glucose levels in your baby. Your baby will produce more insulin in response, just like you do. This can make your baby grow larger than normal. This is called macrosomia. Babies weighing more than 4kg (8lb 8oz) at birth are called macrosomic. Macrosomia increases the risk of: Birth trauma - either the mother or baby can be affected when it is difficult for the baby to be born. Trauma may include physical symptoms, such as bone fractures or nerve damage for the baby, or tearing and severe bleeding for the mother as well as psychological distress. Shoulder dystocia - where the baby’s shoulder is stuck in your pelvis once the head has been born. This can squash the umbilical cord, so the team need to use additional interventions to deliver the baby quickly and safely. It means you may have labour induced early or to have a caesarean section so that your baby is born safely. Your baby's weight will be monitored carefully in pregnancy to see whether these interventions are needed. Continue reading >>

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