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Gestational Diabetes Headache

Gestational Diabetes Complications

Gestational Diabetes Complications

Most Gestational diabetes complications can be avoided if you keep a tight rein on the management of your diabetes. Gestational diabetes is just as dangerous as any of the other types of diabetes, even though it is short-lived (only lasting during gestation). Considering that it is not only your own health, but also the health of your unborn child that are affected by it. From this point of view, it must be seen as even more serious as the other types of diabetes. The development of your baby during the pregnancy will determine largely the lifelong health of your child. This will of course be determined on how well you've managed to avoid the gestational diabetes complications. It really is up to you. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels can be quite dangerous, as it can cause severe problems for you and your baby. These problems are highlighted in the gestational diabetes complications listed below. Most women however, who have gestational diabetes, deliver healthy babies. You can also be counted amongst them, all it takes is to manage your disease with care. It really is up to you. The dangers of gestational diabetes complications does not lie so much with the fact that your body does not control its sugar levels adequately. The danger is more in these elevated blood glucose levels. You can and must assist your body to keep your blood sugar levels within the normal range. If your blood sugar are kept at normal levels, then you or your baby will not fall victim to gestational diabetes complications. How can your Baby be Affected by Gestational Diabetes Complications? When you have gestational diabetes, your baby could be at increased risk for these gestational diabetes complications: Fetal macrosomia. Excessive growth. Extra glucose will cross the placenta, which triggers y Continue reading >>

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes can be particularly hard on pregnant women. It can affect both the mother and her unborn child. Known as gestational diabetes, this condition is now more common than ever. In the United States, it is estimated to affect up to 1 in every 10 pregnancies. The rate is said to be similar in Australia, with new cases of gestational diabetes rising a whopping 21% between 2000 and 2010. Fortunately with early diagnosis and treatment, any negative health effects on mother and child can be significantly minimised. In this article, HealthEngine looks at the health risks and early warning signs of gestational diabetes. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the term given to expecting mothers diagnosed with pre-diabetes (otherwise known as Glucose Intolerance) during their pregnancy. The risk of glucose intolerance – and therefore gestational diabetes – is greatly increased during pregnancy because the efficiency of insulin (the hormone required to remove sugar from our bloodstream) naturally declines during this period. Less efficient insulin means sugar can become 'stuck' in our bloodstream, which leads to many health issues. For this reason, added sugar is basically hazardous to health during and immediately after pregnancy. What are the health risks of gestational diabetes? Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes does not mean you had diabetes before falling pregnant, or that you will have diabetes after pregnancy. But it does mean you need to be extra mindful of the foods you eat to ensure both you and your baby remain healthy. The risks of poorly managed gestational diabetes are serious: The developing foetus is prone to excessive growth and large birth weight, which is not ideal for either mother or child. Children born to mothers with poorly ma Continue reading >>

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia are both conditions that only occur during or just after pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is caused by an inability to use sugar properly during pregnancy, and may result in giving birth to a large baby. One of the potential complications of gestational diabetes is the development of preeclampsia. This condition, which may also be called toxemia of pregnancy or pregnancy-induced hypertension, occurs in about 10 to 30 percent of women with gestational diabetes. What Is Preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is defined as the presence of protein in your urine and high blood pressure occurring after the 20th week of your pregnancy. The condition affects about 5 to 8 percent of all pregnancies. In the United States, preeclampsia rarely causes the death of a mother or infant, but worldwide pregnancy-induced high blood pressure still causes 76,000 maternal deaths and 500,000 infant deaths every year. The cause of preeclampsia remains a mystery. We do know that you are at higher risk if you have gestational diabetes, a family history of preeclampsia, are overweight, or if you had high blood pressure or kidney disease before your pregnancy. Preeclampsia is more common during your first pregnancy, if you are carrying twins, and if you are over age 40 or a teenage mother. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Preeclampsia? The signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are caused by the sudden increase in your blood pressure, retention of fluids in your body, and kidney damage that allows proteins to pass into your urine. High blood pressure. You may have high blood pressure during your pregnancy without swelling or protein in your urine, so high blood pressure alone doesn't mean you have preeclampsia. Your doctor may suspect preeclampsia if you have a sudden increa Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes is a major health problem in America today. Normally, sugars and starches (carbohydrates) are metabolized for use by the body by the chemical insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. If the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, the carbohydrates cannot be used and the level increases in the blood. The carbohydrate that is tested and found in the blood is glucose. Excess glucose in the blood leads to the diagnosis of diabetes. If diabetes is not adequately controlled by diet or insulin injections, complications can occur, such as increases in infections and damage to blood vessels. GESTATIONAL DIABETES When a woman is pregnant, she must share her carbohydrates with the growing baby. The pregnancy hormones can interfere with the ability of the mother's insulin to regulate carbohydrates. In a small percentage of pregnant women (3-12%), the insulin response is very reduced and the blood glucose levels become abnormally high, causing gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy). For the mother, this can mean increased risk of infections or increased chance of a Cesarean section delivery. Following delivery of the baby, the mother's system returns to normal. In addition to problems for the mother, her baby may also suffer from diabetes. Depending upon the blood levels of glucose during the pregnancy, the baby may grow excessively large, causing difficulties at delivery. Additionally, the baby may have temporary difficulty controlling its glucose and calcium at birth. If the mother's blood sugar remains elevated throughout her pregnancy, the baby has increased risk of stillbirth. DETECTING GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes is most often encountered in late pregnancy. In the past, screening for this disease was based on clues such as a family history o Continue reading >>

Headaches In Pregnancy

Headaches In Pregnancy

You are here: Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy Tips Headaches in pregnancy Posted by Admin on September 11th, 2015 12:12 PM Migraines generally get far better in pregnancy. Try to figure out just what activates your migraine and avoid them if possible. Headaches can likewise suggest preeclampsia, particularly later on in pregnancy. Many females experience migraines during maternity actually, practically one-third of ladies will certainly have them often! While this common signs and symptom is often harmless, the migraines can still be awkward as well as at times could require more focus on make certain something worrying isnt going on. Migraines are a specific kind of migraine that are usually severe as well as could be associated with light level of sensitivity, nausea or vomiting, or aesthetic adjustments. Fortunately is that many migraine headache patients have less migraine headaches when they are expecting. Some studies have revealed that 60-80 percent of ladies have actually decreased migraines or no migraine headaches at all while pregnant. Therapies for migraines consist of staying clear of triggers, Tylenol, and also periodically narcotics or muscular tissue relaxants (it is perfect to avoid these last two in maternity if feasible). Early in maternity, migraines may be the result of changing hormone levels or modifications in blood and also liquid quantities. As maternity proceeds, headaches could also be the outcome of postural adjustments or stress as your weight moves more and you are carrying also much more fluid. If you are seeing migraines more commonly, aim to gather some details for your obstetric carrier. Do you notice them if you havent had your morning mug of coffee? Is it even worse when you havent eaten or rested or after youve had a high-salt dish? Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

At some point during your pregnancy, your obstetrician will hand over a small bottle of a sugary flavored drink and ask you to down it just before you come to your next appointment. Within about 60 minutes of taking the drink, you'll have a blood sample taken. This is the glucose screening test for gestational diabetes, or high blood sugar during pregnancy. Between two and 10 of every 100 pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly every pregnant woman under a doctor’s care will take this test because, in some cases, it won’t present visible symptoms. Video of the Day The tricky part about gestational diabetes is that while a pregnant woman is dealing with nausea, backaches, headaches and all the other symptoms of a normal pregnancy, symptoms of increased blood sugar won't necessarily be apparent, notes the Texas Children's Hospital website. However, you could experience blurred vision, fatigue, increased thirst and urination, nausea or vomiting, frequent infections or weight loss despite an increased appetite. Risk Factors for Gestational Diabetes Due to the typical lack of symptoms, doctors test nearly everyone for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks. However, if you are considered high-risk for high blood sugar, your doctor might also screen you at your first prenatal appointment. Those who are considered high risk include women who are obese, have had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, have a family history of diabetes, previously gave birth to a big baby or one with a birth defect, have high blood pressure or are over age 35. Taking the glucose screening test, despite an absence of symptoms, is important for all pregnant women because of the effect high Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with no history of any kind of diabetes in her life. Like the general form, the gestational type is characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels [1]. High glucose levels in the blood can be dangerous both for the mother and child. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed later in pregnancy; so, if you have diabetes in the first trimester that often means you have had it before getting pregnant [2]. Gestational Diabetes Classification Gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM (common) [3] Gestational diabetes insipidus or GDI (rare) [4] What causes diabetes during pregnancy? Researches are still being carried out to find the exact factors triggering high blood glucose levels in pregnancy. But, the hormonal and other changes occurring in your body are known to be responsible for the problem. Certain genetic factors have also been recognized to play a role in some cases [5]. Pathophysiology of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The body changes during pregnancy make your body somewhat resistant to insulin [6]. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to help your body use glucose for producing energy. The reduced functioning of insulin during pregnancy causes glucose build up in the blood, leading to diabetes. Gestational diabetes is more likely to occur late in the second trimester or during the third trimester as the pregnancy hormone levels gradually becomes higher with the advancement of your pregnancy [7]. What are the risk factors for gestational diabetes? Being overweight before conceiving Being over 25 years of age [7] History of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Family history of type 2 diabetes Carrying twins A tendency to have high blood glucose levels, but not hi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Pregnancy Headaches

How To Deal With Pregnancy Headaches

One of the not so pleasant aspects of maternity is the reality of needing to take care of particular minor problems currently as well as then. And also one such issue that could actually leave you in splits is the pregnancy migraine that typically impacts numerous women in the very first trimester of their pregnancy. Common Causes for Headaches during Pregnancy The first and significant cause for constant headaches during pregnancy can be attributed to the increase in hormone levels throughout this time. The abrupt surge of hormonal agents then causes an increase in blood circulation to all components of the body, including the head. This abrupt adjustment can cause migraines throughout pregnancy. Other usual reasons for pregnancy frustrations include aspects like poor posture, stress (both physical and psychological), sinus, absence of appropriate sleep, exhaustion, vision modifications, reduced blood sugar, high blood pressure (called preeclampsia), dehydration, unexpected hunger pains, overheating or caffeine withdrawal etc. Often, females who experience regular migraines before getting pregnant have the tendency to experience less of the exact same after conceiving. For others, however, ladies who get constant migraines before maternity could experience a rise in the regularity as well as intensity of these migraine headaches after developing. In any type of instance, maternity migraines have to be managed promptly and need to be reported to a physician if the discomfort and frequency increase. Dealing with Maternity Headaches the Right Way Before handling a pregnancy migraine, you have to identify the factor as to why it happened to begin with. That alone can assist you take care of it in a far better way. Pregnancy can be a strenuous term for a new mom who should Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

This pregnancy complication is more common than you might think. Learn who's at risk for it, how it's detected, and what can be done to treat it. For years, doctors believed that gestational diabetes affected three to five percent of all pregnancies, but new, more rigorous diagnostic criteria puts the number closer to 18 percent. The condition, which can strike any pregnant woman, usually develops in the second trimester, between weeks 24 and 28, and typically resolves after baby is born. If gestational diabetes is treated and well-managed throughout your pregnancy, "There's no reason you can't deliver a very healthy baby," says Patricia Devine, M.D., perinatologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. But gestational diabetes that goes untreated, or isn't carefully monitored, can be harmful for both mother and baby. Consult our guide for risk factors, signs of gestational diabetes, and treatment options. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy in a woman who previously did not have diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar efficiently. "A hormone produced by the placenta makes a woman essentially resistant to her own insulin," Dr. Devine explains. How does gestational diabetes differ from type 1 or 2 diabetes? Gestational diabetes affects only pregnant women. People who have type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes, are generally born with it. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the U.S.; it occurs in adulthood, and is triggered by lifestyle factors such as obesity and lack of physical activity. What causes it? It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Doctors th Continue reading >>

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