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Gestational Diabetes Growth Scan

Growth Scans & Gestational Diabetes (also In May)

Growth Scans & Gestational Diabetes (also In May)

Growth Scans & Gestational Diabetes (Also in May) Had my 28 week growth scan this today and I think I may be having a monster!!! (But my lovely Little (!!!!) Pink Monster!). Baby is above average in all measurements and is currently weighing 3lb 8oz!!! They are predicting that if I go full term lo will weigh 9.5lb (ouch!!!). However they did say that it looks as if I won't be going full term as looks like gestational diabetes is developing. I had to have a GTT at 14 weeks and results were borderline so they put me on 3 times a day blood tests, which until the last couple of week have been fine, but sugar levels are now starting to creep up so looks like they may have been right Are any of the other May Ladies suffering with Gestational Diabetes and if so have you been told that you will deliver early (if so how early)? Just feeling a bit confused (and a bit guilty that I might not be giving bubs the best start ) as no one seems to be telling me anything eg, what type of birth I will be allowed to have or an indication of when. To top it all off today I tried to chase up my Ante-natal Classes only to be told that they are stopping doing them in my Hospital and will be replacing them with open days with different stalls covering different topics but these won't be available at the hospital until 15th May - I'll be 38 weeks by then - so now sounds as if I may not be able to have any clases before lo arrives I'm due in april and i also have gestational diabetes. I saw the anaesthetist today and was told that it is likely that i will deliver at least 2 weeks early (ie 38 weeks) but (and its a big but!!) it is all dependent on how the baby is growing - basically they look at how big he is and also whether his growth is escalating. I see my consultant next week so i'm going t Continue reading >>

Diet Prevents Big Babies In Gestational Diabetes Patients

Diet Prevents Big Babies In Gestational Diabetes Patients

A healthy diet alone can control gestational diabetes and doesn't put the mother at greater risk of having a big baby, new research from the Royal Women's Hospital has found. The study, published in the Journal of Pregnancy, paves the way for a change in how women with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy) are managed by health care services with women who can meet blood sugar targets through dietary modification alone no longer considered as having a high risk pregnancy. The research involved 202 women who were controlling their gestational diabetes with diet, and found their babies on average were slightly smaller compared to healthy pregnant women in the control group. Lead researcher Dr Fatima Vally said the results were very exciting. “Women with gestational diabetes can face an up to 50 per cent increased risk of having a large baby*, which comes with risks of possible complications such as injury to the baby and mother during delivery, emergency or planned caesarean delivery, and haemorrhage,” Dr Vally said. “Babies also face a higher risk of low blood sugar levels and needing special care treatment after birth. “However, our research has shown that with adequate dietary advice and regular blood glucose monitoring those risks are minimised as women who control their gestational diabetes through diet alone do not have an increased risk of delivering a big baby.” The women with diabetes received medical and nutritional advice and support through the country’s first and largest dedicated Diabetes in Pregnancy Clinic at the Women’s. Senior author and Head of the Women’s Diabetes in Pregnancy Clinic Dr Tom Cade said the research means that women successful at controlling their gestational diabetes without needing insulin, shoul Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

Diabetes in pregnancy: management from preconception to the postnatal period If you are at risk of or have gestational diabetes At your antenatal appointments you should get extra care because of your diabetes as well as the normal antenatal care that all pregnant women get. Your care team should check on you and your baby. At each appointment you should be offered information and advice, and have the chance to ask questions and to talk with your midwife or doctor about any concerns you might have. You should have contact with your care team every 1 to 2weeks to talk about your blood glucose control. You may also find the NICE information for the public on antenatal care useful (see other NICE guidance ). If you already had diabetes before getting pregnant An appointment with a joint diabetes and antenatal care team should be arranged for you straight away when you first get pregnant. The table below gives a guide to the extra care that you should receive at your antenatal appointments. The extra antenatal care that your care team should offer Booking appointment ideally by 10weeks of pregnancy Information, advice and support about your blood glucose levels and about how diabetes will affect pregnancy, birth and early care of the baby Ask about your diabetes, current medications and general health Eye examination (unless you have had one in the last 3months) Kidney test if you have not had one in the last 3months. At 79weeks, check how far along your pregnancy is Advise you to take 75mg of aspirin daily from 12weeks until the birth of the baby, to reduce the risk of preeclampsia (high blood pressure in pregnancy) Eye examination at 1620weeks if you had diabetic retinopathy at your first visit Ultrasound scan to confirm that your baby is developing normally, including c Continue reading >>

Ultrasound Scan—fetal Growth Scan

Ultrasound Scan—fetal Growth Scan

Your maternity care provider has referred you for an ultrasound scan to assess the baby’s size and the amniotic fluid volume. This type of ultrasound scan is referred to as a fetal growth scan. Why is a fetal growth scan needed? Common reasons to have a fetal growth scan in pregnancy include the following: Your abdomen measures smaller or larger than expected. Previous pregnancy complications. Maternal diabetes or high blood pressure. What happens during a fetal growth scan? During the fetal growth scan, various measurements are taken of the fetus. The measurements are plotted on a growth chart, according to the number of weeks pregnant that you are at the time of the scan (gestational age).The main fetal measurements taken for a growth scan include: Biparietal diameter (BPD) measures across the head Head Circumference (HC) – measures around the head Abdominal Circumference (AC) – measures around the abdomen Femur Length (FL) – measures the length of the thigh bone An estimate of fetal weight (EFW) can be calculated by combining the above measurements. The EFW can be plotted on a graph to help determine whether the fetus is average, larger or smaller in size for its gestational age. If the fetal weight estimate is below the bottom 10 per cent line on the graph, it is considered to be small for gestational age (SGA). If the fetal weight is above the top 10 per cent line on the graph, it is considered to be large for gestational age (LGA). It is important to note that repeated ultrasound measurements of the same fetus can vary and the estimated fetal weight may be incorrect by as much as 20 per cent. A fetal growth scan does not routinely check the baby for abnormities. An ultrasound scan to look for major fetal abnormalities is routinely performed earlier in preg Continue reading >>

Growth Scan During Pregnancy Everything You Need To Know

Growth Scan During Pregnancy Everything You Need To Know

Growth Scan During Pregnancy Everything You Need To Know Diagnostic tests and scans usually go hand in hand with pregnancy. However, most scans occur way before your third trimester. So, when your doctor recommends a growth scan in the third trimester, anxiety is bound to creep in. While your concerns arent unwarranted, it may be necessary for you to undergo a growth scan during pregnancy. Read our post below to understand why you need to undergo a growth scan, and what purpose it serves. A growth scan is an ultrasound scan that determines whether your babys growth is normal. Doctors typically recommend it for women during the third trimester of pregnancy; one of the reasons it is also a fetal growth scan [1] . A growth scan in pregnancy is performed to provide your doctor with useful information about fetal growth and your pregnancy [2] . It helps the doctor: Determine the final position of the placenta. [ Read: Is Ultrasound Safe During Pregnancy ] You may need a growth scan in, (usually your third trimester), for various reasons [4] . Some of these reasons include: If you have had complications in your previous pregnancies, your doctor may perform additional scans to monitor the fetal health. Pregnancy complications can mean health risks for you and the unborn fetus. If you had a health problem before you became pregnant, it could lead to pregnancy complications. You may even experience medical problems during pregnancy. Accidents or injuries can also lead to pregnancy complications. In such cases, doctors may opt for a late pregnancy growth scan to keep a tab on health problems that can arise due to pregnancy complications [5] . Pregnancy complications can also arise due to the placental position. Placenta praevia means the placenta is laying low in the womb. It ca Continue reading >>

(pdf) Accelerated Fetal Growth Prior To Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study Of Nulliparous Women

(pdf) Accelerated Fetal Growth Prior To Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study Of Nulliparous Women

Accelerated fetal growth prior to diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study of nulliparous women Running title: Fetal overgrowth predates GDM diagnosis Dr Ulla Sovio, PhD,1 Senior Research Associate in Biostatistics. Prof Helen R Murphy, MD,2 Professor of Medicine. Prof Gordon C.S. Smith, DSc, FMedSci.1 Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Cambridge; NIHR Cambridge Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre, Cambridge, CB2 0SW, 2Norwich Medical School, Floor 2, Bob Champion Research and Education Building, James Watson Road, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich Prof GCS Smith, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Cambridge, Box 223 The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, CB2 2SW, UK. Tel: +44 (0)1223 336871, Fax: +44 (0)1223 215327, E-mail: [email protected] Objectives To determine whether fetal overgrowth preceded the diagnosis of GDM, and to quantify the inter-relationships between fetal overgrowth, GDM and maternal Research Design and Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of unselected nulliparous women, and performed ultrasonic measurement of the fetal abdominal circumference (AC) and head circumference (HC) at 20 and 28 wkGA. Exposures were diagnosis of GDM 28 wkGA and maternal obesity. The risk of AC >90th and HC:AC ratio <10th percentile were modelled using log-binomial regression, Results 171 (4.2%) of 4069 women were diagnosed with GDM at 28 wkGA. There was no association between fetal biometry at 20 wkGA and subsequent maternal diagnosis of GDM. However, at 28 wkGA, there was an increased risk (adjusted relative risk [95% CI]) of AC >90th percentile (2.05 [1.37 to 3.07]) and HC:AC ratio <10th percentile (1.97 [1.30 to 2.99]). Maternal o Continue reading >>

Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes - Need Advice!!!!

Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes - Need Advice!!!!

Diagnosed Gestational diabetes - need advice!!!! I had a gowth scan at 32 weeks which showed a bigger than expected baby, so I was sent for a GTT. I have only just got the results back and I have GD. I am 35+4. I am having a growth scan next week and have been given a montior to check my sugars throughout the day - and they want me to see how I go for a week, and if I can control through the diet. I see the consultant next tuesday and will have growth result back then too. I'm quite worried that I'm this late on in pregnancy and its only just been discovered. I know nothing about it. MW told me today there is increased risk stillbirth which has really upset me. Why is that? I don't know what the other risks are - can soemone enlighten me and how do we go about reducing those risks. What should be happening? Will being induced earlier prevent risks? Hi there. I am in the same boat. I think the reason that the chance of still born is higher is because the placenta stops being so effective later on due to the sugar. Therefore, induction is more likely on or before your due date. Any reduction in sugar will help your LO. GD is a very common pregnancy issue and there are a lot of posts about this in the gestational complications forum. Really helpful as well. Try not to panic though. If your sugars cannot be controlled by diet then they may give you metformin which is a tablet to help with this. You still have over a month to go, so its not too late. Hi there. I am in the same boat. I think the reason that the chance of still born is higher is because the placenta stops being so effective later on due to the sugar. Therefore, induction is more likely on or before your due date. Any reduction in sugar will help your LO. GD is a very common pregnancy issue and there are a lot Continue reading >>

I Have Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes Genesis Perinatal Caregenesis Dubai

I Have Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes Genesis Perinatal Caregenesis Dubai

Gestational Diabetes. How does it change the management of my pregnancy? Gestational Diabetes. How does it change the management of my pregnancy? Gestational Diabetes. How does it change the management of my pregnancy? The care for those who have been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetesshould at best involve the help of a nutritionist dietician, endocrinologist and your obstetrician gynaecologist. They all work as a team to optimise your blood sugars and at the same time monitor you and your baby ensuring normal growth and a safe delivery. In Dubai it is common the physicians to work in isolation and a system should be in place to ensure the team has the best communication in particular between the endocrinologist and obstetrician gynaecologist. Common interventions other changes of the diet are; Sugar self-monitoring; your endocrinologist will provide you with the kit and instruction how to best monitor daily your sugars to ensure you achieve your targets. Insulin treatment; Some women even with a good diet may need insulin to control their blood sugar. It is important for those who need insulin and their immediate family to have access to training how to deal with proper monitoring and what to do in cases of hypoglycaemia low sugars. Specialist ultrasound scans; Those mothers who have been diagnosed in the first trimester with Diabetes and especially those that require insulin do need targeted organ ultrasound scans as there is a higher risk for anomalies. many of these mothers will be found to have type II diabetes rather than Gestational Diabetes. Monitor babys growth in mothers with Gestational Diabetes; Your obstetrician will perform regular growth and dopplers ultrasound scans to monitor your babys growth. For those mothers who require insulin the involvement of Continue reading >>

Treatment For Gestational Diabetes

Treatment For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is treated by making changes to diet and exercise to manage blood sugar levels, and using medication if necessary. If you are found to have gestational diabetes, this is likely to be a worrying time for you. It is natural to want your pregnancy to go smoothly and it is normal to be anxious if something unexpected happens. But once gestational diabetes is diagnosed, you will have extra appointments and specialists who will help you navigate your pregnancy safely. The important thing to remember is that if you follow the advice, you can help reduce the risks to you and your baby. For most women, having gestational diabetes will mean the following: This does mean that your experience of pregnancy may be different from what you had expected. But there is support out there from your diabetes team and from your midwife. "Gestational diabetes sounded like something small to me, but it was big. It changes your whole pregnancy I couldnt have the birth I wanted. It preyed on my mind and I started creating problems in my head, but looking at my son, youd never know that anything had happened at all." As gestational diabetes can be a warning of possible later type 2 diabetes, it gives you the chance to make lifestyle changes that may reduce your risks of developing diabetes in later life. You will have more regular appointments and will see more specialist healthcare professionals. As soon as you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes through tests , you will be offered an appointment with a specialist team within one week.It will probably be at your local pregnancy diabetes clinic and should start to receive extra care straight away. At this point you should have the HbA1c test to check whether you had type 2 diabetes before you became pregnant. You will hav Continue reading >>

Maternal Obesity And Diabetes In Pregnancy Result In Early Overgrowth Of The Baby In The Womb

Maternal Obesity And Diabetes In Pregnancy Result In Early Overgrowth Of The Baby In The Womb

Maternal obesity and diabetes in pregnancy result in early overgrowth of the baby in the womb Maternal obesity and diabetes in pregnancy result in early overgrowth of the baby in the womb The babies of obese women who develop gestational diabetes are five times as likely to be excessively large by six months of pregnancy, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge. The study, which shows that excessive fetal growth begins weeks before at-risk women are screened for gestational diabetes, suggests that current screening programmes may take place too late during pregnancy to prevent lasting health impacts on the offspring. Given the risk of complications for both mother and child from gestational diabetes, our findings suggest that screening women earlier on in pregnancy may help improve the short and long term outcomes for these women Gestational diabetes is a condition that can affect women during pregnancy, with those who are obese at greater risk. As well as affecting the mothers health, the condition also causes the unborn child to grow larger, putting the mother at risk during childbirth and increasing the likelihood that her offspring will develop obesity and diabetes during later life. The condition can usually be controlled through a combination of diet and exercise, and medication if these measures fail. Women are screened for the condition through a blood glucose test at around 8-12 weeks into pregnancy. Current guidelines in the UK and the USA recommend that mothers found to be at greatest risk should then be offered a full test at between 24 and 28 weeks into pregnancy; however, in practice the majority of women are screened at the 28 week mark. Researchers at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at the University of Cambridge analysed Continue reading >>

Clinic Appointments | Gestational Diabetes Uk

Clinic Appointments | Gestational Diabetes Uk

Following a positive diagnosis of gestational diabetes you will usually be asked to attend hospital for a diabetes clinic appointment, returning for regular appointments throughout the rest of your pregnancy. The frequency of appointments may differ from one hospital to another and may depend on how well you control your blood sugar levels. You may be asked to attend group meetings with other diabetic mothers or in some areas they may hold 'breakfast club' meetings where you are given set foods to eat and then test your levels. Please note, breakfast clubs are not common practice. At these clinic appointments you could meet with any number of professionals, but who's who? diabetic midwife (dmw) - a midwife who specialises in diabetes diabetic specialist nurse (dsn) - a nurse who specialises in diabetes phlebotomist - a specialistwho collects blood from patients sonographer - a specialist who performs ultrasound imaging dietitians - a specialist in dietary advice consultant obstetrician - a specialist consultant in pregnancy and childbirth consultant diabetologist - a specialist consultant in diabetes consultant endocrinologist - a specialist indisorders of the endocrine system (hormone related conditions), such as diabetes and hyperthyroidism The sound of meeting so many different healthcare professionals may feel daunting, but you will usually have separate appointments to see different people and may go from one to another. They won't all be a room staring at you! You may attend an appointment one week and only see two medical professionals and another appointment see many of those mentioned above. Tips to make the most of your clinic appointments: Make a list of questions to take with you - It is very hard to remember everything you want to know in the appointments Continue reading >>

Does A Big Tummy On Baby's Scan Always Mean Gestational Diabetes?

Does A Big Tummy On Baby's Scan Always Mean Gestational Diabetes?

Just wondering if anyone else had a growth scan showing baby had a huge tummy? I'm 36 plus and her tummy is measuring more like 40 weeks and is off the growth charts. I'm re-doing glucose test tomorrow and if it's positive they may do planned c-section at 38 weeks instead of 39. I'm stewing about it as I did the glucose test at about 28 weeks and was init Initially told I 'failed' the test - then told there'd been a mix-up and results were normal. I'm stressing that I have had GD and it's been missed for weeks! PuffTheMagicDragon1Thu 16-Feb-17 19:11:24 DS was measuring large for dates, large tummy and head. Had the test and came back normal and he was born 8'11. And m sure you will be fine I don't think his tummy measuring 40 weeks is too large I think DS tummy was measuring about 39 weeks at 36/37. Natural to worry but I'm sure you are in good hands Fingers crossed she is just big rather than suffering from too much glucose in my system. Her head and legs are fairly petite - it's just the tum! My son was 4kg at 38 weeks - with a huge head and tummy. I passed the test with him and they didn't ever re-test me. If it wasn't for the confusion over the first test this time round, I don't think I'd be worrying so much. Fingers crossed I get the results back quickly to put me out of my misery! I had my growth scan today and my babys belly is measuring big..she said (exact words) - "fat baby, dont care. Average baby, dont care. Skinny baby, i care". She said he was just a little fatty so dont worry x Had a growth scan at 34 weeks and bbs abdomen 96tb percentile so retested for gd which came back normal range - just a chubby baby i think? DD1 looked like a toad, she had a smallish head, skinny limbs and a massive belly! No gestational diabetes. My next two babies where fat all Continue reading >>

Growth Scans - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Growth Scans - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I just got back from the Dr. I give birth in 8 weeks. Between now and then I am scheduled for 5 growth scans. Is that the same with everyone else? Starting in a week and a half I will be 32w. I will have a growth scan every Monday and and NST every Thursday. I am already scheduled for a csection at 39w1d. But was told that may change. As of right now our little guy is measuring at 53 percentile. Are you sure they are technically growth scans? I had a growth scan at 32 and today at 36 weeks. In between I am having weekly BPPs, which is not as complicated or time consuming. Typically they just look at amniotic fluid levels, practice breathing, heart rate, and movements. They score her certain points out of 8. If she passes then we don't have to do the NST. She has always scored 8. This week and a month ago they also did her head, femur, stomach, and waist measurements to give a general idea of how big or little she is. I wish I had growth scans scheduled I'm 30 weeks on Monday and my dr has done nothing different with this pregnancy than any other even though I do have GD. I see them next week and then start every two week appt but they do that for everyone after 30 weeks. They said I won't get another growth scan until 36 weeks and that's the last one. I had a scan at 27+4 and baby was at 50th percentile and measuring a week ahead so right on track. Is it because I am diet controlled that they aren't moitoring me more closely? They also have said they will just let me go into natural labor unless some other complication arises they have never mentioned NST or any of that stuff I guess now it has me worried as maybe this is something they should be doing? The practice is very reputable the head of it is the head of obgyn/gynecology at the hospital as well so I trust them Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Growth Scans, Diabetes And A Laughable Growth Chart

Growth Scans, Diabetes And A Laughable Growth Chart

Growth Scans, Diabetes and a laughable growth chart Growth Scans, Diabetes and a laughable growth chart Growth Scans, Diabetes and a laughable growth chart I had a growth scan yesterday which was a follow up from one I had 4 weeks ago as i was referred for baby being too small according to the magic tape measure. The original growth scan came up as baby being over the 95th so total opposite of the 'She's too small' panic they had me on in the first place. I was then measured a few days ago with the tape and she was in the middle. I had my growth scan yesterday and she's enormous again and also had a blood glucose test. I went to see the consultant today, one of the midwives asked me if i was diabetic after having a look at my urine sample to which I replied no, but as it's my last day at work i have been partaking in Danish pastries, jelly and some pop (as you do!) but had a blood test yesterday. She said my bloods from yesterday were normal so it's probably just all the sugar i've had this morning. I then went into see the consultant who proceeded to tell me my bloods were elevated and all the risks of diabetes and how likely it is if i have diabetes that I would have a stillborn baby. Bearing in mind at this point i am almost 36 weeks pregnant, and i am tiny, i personally think i will be lucky to go the next fortnight without baby making an appearance. I am booked in next week for the sugary drink test thing and will be nearly 36 and a half weeks by then. So if i am diabetic I will be referred to a dietician which will most likely be a few more days at which point i will be 37 weeks pregnant! My growth chart is just silly, there are just x's and O's all over the bloody place. If their measurements are so accurate (accurate enough to be sternly telling me about stillb Continue reading >>

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