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Gestational Diabetes Grocery List

Gestational Diabetes Food List

Gestational Diabetes Food List

You’ve recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, and you want to know what you can eat. Well, the good news is that other than foods to limit & avoid during pregnancy in general, there really aren’t any foods that are forbidden when you have gestational diabetes. I did put together a gestational diabetes food list for you though. They key is knowing how to put foods together in a way that won’t make your blood sugar spike. A gestational diabetes carb counting diet is typically recommended for women with gestational diabetes. Creating healthy meals is much easier when you have the right foods in the house. Having healthy foods easily accessible means that you’re less likely to go out to eat, order take-out, or go through a drive-thru on your way home from work. I’m not saying that it’s impossible to eat healthy when you’re at a restaurant, but it’s definitely easier at home. I’ve put together a gestational diabetes food list. Hopefully this will serve as a starting point for you in coming up with some healthy meal ideas that work for you (and your gestational diabetes). If you’re in a hurry and want a printable gestational diabetes food list to take with you, you can download one here. Printable Gestational Diabetes Food List Protein Foods (includes both animal and plant-based proteins) Lean ground beef Lean ground turkey Lean beef or pork steaks Boneless, skinless chicken breasts Frozen turkey breast (NOT DELI TURKEY!) Rotisserie chicken Shrimp (stay within weekly limits for fish) Salmon (stay within weekly limits for fish) Canned light tuna, packed in water (stay within weekly limits for fish) Eggs (or egg substitutes) Cottage cheese Greek yogurt (choose lower sugar varieties) Lowfat cheeses (make sure everything is pasteurized) Hummus Tofu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Grocery List

Diabetes Diet Grocery List

Carbohydrates provide your body with a major source of fuel. But, if you have diabetes, your body has trouble metabolizing the glucose it gets from the carbohydrate-containing foods you eat. If you have diabetes, you need to make healthy food choices to help manage your condition. This typically involves monitoring your food portions, choosing highly nutritious items, and avoiding or limiting foods high in added sugar. Talk to your doctor about individualized fat, sodium and carbohydrate goals. Video of the Day Whole grain foods are high in fiber and a nutritious part of a diabetes meal plan. Add a variety of whole grain foods to your weekly grocery list and make them staples in your diet. The best whole grain choices include brown rice, quinoa, wild rice, buckwheat, whole grain barley, oatmeal, whole rye bread, and foods made with whole-wheat flour. Incorporate these foods into your diet in the appropriate portion sizes. For example, one slice of whole wheat bread contains 15 carbohydrates. As a diabetic, you're encouraged to eat a variety of fruits, non-starchy vegetables and beans. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at meals. Add fresh, frozen and canned vegetables without added salt to your shopping list. One-half-cup of cooked vegetables or 1 cup of raw vegetables is considered a serving, according to the American Diabetes Association. Add non-starchy vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, eggplant, leeks, onions, mushrooms, squash and leafy greens. You can eat all fruit regardless of type, but be mindful of your portions. A small piece of whole fruit or one-half cup contains about 15 grams of carbohydrates. Meat, Fish, Dairy and Oils Choose a variety of fresh and frozen meat, fish and poultry. Examples include chicken breast, 93 percent Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List

What Can I Eat if I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List Gestational diabetes is diabetes that only takes place in pregnant women. That means you cannot get gestational diabetes unless youre pregnant. You might develop gestational diabetes for the first time during pregnancy or you might have a mild undiagnosed case of diabetes that gets worse when youre pregnant. Food List for Pregnant Women withGestational Diabetes During pregnancy, the way your body uses insulin changes. Insulin is a hormonal agent that breaks the foods you eat down into glucose, or sugar. You then use that glucose for energy. Youll naturally become more resistant to insulin when youre pregnant to help provide your baby with more glucose. In some women, the process fails and your body either stops reacting to insulin or does not make sufficient insulin to offer you the glucose you need. When that takes place, youll have too much sugar in your blood. That causes gestational diabetes. If you have actually recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or are curious about what will take place if you are identified with it, keep reading for more information about preserving a healthy pregnancy. Include daily vegetables and fruits in your diet Thirty percent or less of your diet ought to be comprised of fat Take notice of part sizes to prevent overeating If you have gestational diabetes, maintaining a healthy, well balanced diet might assist you manage your symptoms without needing medication. In general, your diet should include protein plus the right mix of carbs and fats. You can still eat fruit if you have diabetes, youll simply need to keep track of how much youre consuming. Ask your doctor or a registered dietitian about counting your carbs to make sure you arent consuming excessive sugar. Whe Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes can cause a range of complications during pregnancy. Fortunately, a woman can help reduce complications by following a healthful diet. What foods should women eat and what foods should they avoid if they have gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs if a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin, during her pregnancy. This deficiency leads to high blood sugar. High blood sugar levels may cause problems for the woman and her baby if not managed properly. This article explains what type of diet a woman should follow during pregnancy if she has gestational diabetes. It also considers other treatment options for gestational diabetes and what complications may occur if the condition is not properly managed. Contents of this article: Understanding gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes each year in the United States. This type of diabetes occurs when a woman's body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps the body's cells to use sugar from the blood as energy. When a woman is pregnant, her body will produce more hormones, and she may put on weight. Both of these changes may mean that her body's cells may not use insulin as well as they used to. This is called insulin resistance. Becoming resistant to insulin means that the body needs more of it in order to use up the sugar in the blood. Sometimes a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin to keep up. This leads to a sugar buildup in the blood, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Symptoms of gestational diabetes may include: being unusually thirsty Continue reading >>

Week 24 - Gestational Diabetes | Lucie's List

Week 24 - Gestational Diabetes | Lucie's List

3-10% of pregnant women in the US will be diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes during their pregnancy. Will you be one of them? Even if you dont currently have a problem with this condition, please read this whole article. If you have elevated levels of blood glucose during pregnancy, you have a condition called Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, or GDM. The incidence of gestational diabetes has doubled over the last 6 8 years and is closely paralleling the obesity epidemic. The hallmark of GDM is increased insulin resistance and seems to be related to the placenta. You see, certain placental compounds either destroy insulin OR cause the mother to make more sugar available in the bloodstream. A pregnant woman needs up to 3 TIMES the amount of insulin to regulate the same amount of sugar a non-pregnant woman needs. When you have gestational diabetes, your pancreas works overtime to produce more insulin, but the insulin does not lower your blood glucose levels as it should. Without enough insulin, glucose cannot leave the blood to be changed to energy. Glucose builds up to high levels in the blood, a condition called hyperglycemia. The insulin does not cross the placenta, BUT glucose and other nutrients do. Extra blood glucose flows through giving the baby high blood glucose levels.This causes the babys pancreas to make extra insulin to get rid of the blood glucose. Since the baby is getting more energy than he/sheneeds to grow and develop, the extra energy is stored as fat. Its the same process that makes adults fat. Excess fat leads to a condition called macrosomia, ora big ol baby. Babies with macrosomia face health problems of their own. A huge problem (no pun intended) is getting that giant baby out of you. Babies with macrosomia can have shoulder damage from the deliver Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Menu

The Gestational Diabetes Menu

Planning your gestational diabetes menu can be challenging. It can be less of a chore when you follow these simple guidelines. Learn to look at food with a different perspective. See the foods according to these categories. Protein Red meat, for example: Pork. Beef. Mutton. Poultry, for example: Chicken. Turkey. Duck. Legumes, like: Lentils. Beans, for example: Soya beans. Kidney beans. Butter beans. Bake beans. Eggs. Cheese. Nuts. Carbohydrates Starch. Rice. Grains. Cereals. Bread. Pasta. Spaghetti. Macaroni. Noodles. Vegetables. Potatoes. Corn. Vegetables for example: Green beans. Sweet potato. Lettuce. Fruit, for example: Peaches. Oranges. Apples. Kiwi. Plums. Dairy. Milk. Fat Poultry skins. Avocado. Nuts. Dairy: Milk. Butter. Cheese. Fiber All vegetables. All fruit. Grains. Nuts. It is impossible to show you every food available, get the information from the labels. Plan your meals for the gestational diabetes menu according to the categories above. You need the correct balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat. When planning your gestational diabetes menu, split the carbohydrates as starch, vegetables and fruit and dairy. Count the value of the food according to the ingredient that is the most common. For example, nuts contain fat, protein and fiber, but its main source is protein. Therefore, if you need some protein for a meal, then nuts will be a good choice. However, if you need to add some fat, then nuts would be the wrong choice. Avocados are a fruit, but count it as a fat on your gestational diabetes menu. Always have a protein when you eat carbohydrates. The required dietary fat will come naturally it is thus easy to have too much. Therefore, limit the amount of fat in your diet. Recommended Meal Sizes for the Gestational Diabetes Menu Breakfast. 2 Servings Continue reading >>

8 Diabetes Grocery Shopping Mistakes To Avoid

8 Diabetes Grocery Shopping Mistakes To Avoid

You know how it is…. You have excellent intentions…. But when you head into the supermarket, suddenly the thousands of products available overwhelm you. So many food labels, advertisements, and even food sampling tables attempt to derail you. On busy days, just the cart traffic can be stressful. Check out these common mistakes and some suggested remedies….. 1. Shopping Without a List Going to the store unprepared — This is, by far, the biggest mistake people make while shopping. In order to avoid impulse purchases, or wasteful spending, be sure to plan ahead. Make your weekly meal plan, including breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks. List all the necessary ingredients on your shopping list. Many phone apps are out there, to help you keep organized. After you have your list of needed supplies, stick to that list! Step away from the bakery aisle and the candy in the check-out lane. Tips: Plan ahead, make a list, and stick to it. 2. Not Taking Advantage of Sales Checking the weekly specials can save you a lot of money. Shopping fresh produce in season, or seasonal offerings (think turkey in November or ham in April) is a smart way to shop. Apples may be available year-round, but certain varieties will be much less expensive in September. Watermelon will not only taste better in the summer months, it will be on sale for 4th of July week. Buying extra berries when they are on sale in the summer, and freezing them for use in winter months is cost effective. You can buy extra and freeze all sorts of fruits and vegetables – peaches, berries, asparagus, and green chiles. Weekly sale prices are also great times to stock up on stapes – canned beans, frozen vegetables, chicken breasts and thighs, and bottled water. Tips: Always take advantage of store’s weekly spec Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Gestational diabetes (GDM) can happen during pregnancy as hormone levels in your body change. These changes affect how your body manages glucose (sugar). GDM makes it harder for your body to control your blood glucose and increases your risk for type 2 diabetes and other health conditions later in life. Eating a healthy, well balanced diet, managing your weight gain and being physically active can help control your blood glucose and give you and your baby the nutrients you need for a healthy pregnancy. Ask your health care provider to refer you to a diabetes clinic in your community. The dietitian and rest of the health care team will help you to plan a healthy diet that works for you and to have a healthy pregnancy. The information in this handout can help you to get started. Steps You Can Take Eat regular, balanced meals and snacks. Enjoy three meals and three snacks spaced evenly throughout the day. Include at least three food groups in a meal and two food groups for a snack. Eat one of your snacks at bedtime. A balanced diet contains foods with carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats. Carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels. Read on to learn which carbohydrates are the healthiest choices for you. Carbohydrate is found in grain products, fruit and fruit juice, some vegetables, milk and alternatives, dried beans, peas and lentils, and foods such as cakes, cookies, squares, candy and sugary drinks. Choose fibre-rich sources of carbohydrates like whole grain breads and cereals, and dried beans, peas and lentils. Fibre slows carbohydrate absorption into your blood. Choose vegetables and fruit rather than juice. Choose low glycemic index (GI) foods more often. Low GI foods raise blood glucose at a slower rate than high GI foods. See Additional Resources Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that only occurs in pregnant women. That means you can't get gestational diabetes unless you’re pregnant. You may develop gestational diabetes for the first time during pregnancy or you might have a mild undiagnosed case of diabetes that gets worse when you’re pregnant. During pregnancy, the way your body uses insulin changes. Insulin is a hormone that breaks the foods you eat down into glucose, or sugar. You then use that glucose for energy. You’ll naturally become more resistant to insulin when you’re pregnant to help provide your baby with more glucose. In some women, the process goes wrong and your body either stops responding to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin to give you the glucose you need. When that happens, you’ll have too much sugar in your blood. That causes gestational diabetes. If you have recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or are curious about what will happen if you are diagnosed with it, keep reading to learn more about maintaining a healthy pregnancy. Eat protein with every meal. Include daily fruits and vegetables in your diet. Thirty percent or less of your diet should be made up of fat. Limit or avoid processed foods. Pay attention to portion sizes to avoid overeating. If you have gestational diabetes, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet may help you manage your symptoms without needing medication. In general, your diet should include protein plus the right mix of carbohydrates and fats. Once you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, ask your doctor about working with a registered dietitian or nutritionist. They can help you plan your meals and come up with an eating plan that will keep you and your baby healthy. Aim to base your meals around protein. Include lots of fresh foods a Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Eating Well

Eating Well

We hope that the following practical information on eating and staying well will help you feel positive and encouraged to stick to the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet. The GDM diet is basically a really healthy way of eating which can benefit the whole family. Read on for tips on everything from exercising, eating cake and dealing with hunger. Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator What about exercise? What’s the deal with carbs? So you’ve just found out that you need to manage your daily carbohydrate (carb) intake. This can be a little tricky. Carbs are now a problem for you but also the solution. You need carbs and your baby needs carbs. Carbohydrates are our energy food. They are contained in many important food groups i.e. bread and cereals, fruits, vegetables and dairy. You can’t just cut them out or your diet would end up unbalanced and insufficient but too much of them means too much glucose in your bloodstream. The answer is this. You need to eat a consistent and moderate amount of carbs regularly through the day. Timing: Ideally you should be eating every 2.5-3hrs. Leaving a much longer gap means you might get too hungry and want to eat more when you finally do eat. Eating every hour means your body is going to find it too hard to keep processing all the time. Try having 3 meals and 3 small snacks through the day. These should be at times of the day that suit you. Type & Amount: Choose nutritious or high-fibre carbs i.e. wholegrain breads and crackers, pasta, starchy vegetables such as corn and potato, legumes, low fat dairy milk and yoghurt and fruit. A fist-sized amount of carbohydrate is a good rule of thumb to go by until you see a dietitian. This is usually equal to about a standard cup measure (2 Continue reading >>

Grocery List Needed For Snacks

Grocery List Needed For Snacks

So I don't meet with the dietician til next week so need to stock up on good GD food. Can I get brands of snacks from you ladies? Or maybe sample meals you eat. All advice welcome! Biggest thing I watch is pairing protein with all my carbs including snacks. For breakfast I mix eggs with a little cheese and peppers or just plain hard boiled if I'm in a hurry. Then add some peanut butter on a half whole wheat muffin. For AM snack I always eat a string cheese because it's easy and add some pepperonis, goldfish crackers or blueberries. My PM snack is fat free Greek yogurt ( I rotate flavors) due to the fact is has a ton of protein in it already. For main meals I eat lots of meat and veggies since I am pretty carb sensitive currently. I have found that quinoa has been a great carb addition that doesn't increase my numbers. Plus is goes with all veggies. Then I have a late night snack of skim milk before bed to ensure I have a low fasting number. It works for me and I have been going this three weeks already. Low numbers, more energy and I haven't gotten bored yet Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Making lifestyle changes to follow a good gestational diabetes diet will mean achieving lower blood sugar levels which will ultimately benefit your baby hugely and reduce the risks and complications associated with gestational diabetes. But what is a good gestational diabetes diet? Our golden rules to eating The best approach to food we have found is to stick to these 8 golden rules: Eat little & often, ideally 3 meals and 3 snacks a day 'Pair' foods so that they will be tolerated better, "food pairing" is a term that we use in relation to the GD diet Eat high protein Eat good, natural fats Eat low amounts of unrefined complex starchy carbohydrates at every meal Bulk up meals with lots of vegetables & salad Drink plenty of water Go for a stroll We explain all these points in more detail below... #1. Eat little and often Ideally we want blood sugar levels which look (if we were to draw a picture) like rolling hills, rather than huge spikes and crashes. The best way to achieve good control over levels is to choose sensible foods and to eat little amounts often. We advise aiming for 3 meals and 3 snacks a day. Avoiding to eat is something that many mothers do when they are first diagnosed with gestational diabetes as they are unsure or too scared over what to eat. This can actually have a detrimental effect on blood sugar levels. If a meal or snack is missed then blood sugar levels can drop low and when this happens the liver dumps glucose into the bloodstream to give us energy and keep us going. The glucose can raise our levels high and then when eating our next meal, as levels are higher than they should be, they raise even higher. Following a big spike in levels, the body will signal the pancreas to produce insulin, but with gestational diabetes we may not be able to pr Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

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