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Gestational Diabetes Fasting Numbers Going Up

Stupid Fasting Levels!! (gestational Diabetes)

Stupid Fasting Levels!! (gestational Diabetes)

Stupid fasting levels!! (Gestational Diabetes) I had GD with my previous pregnancy & my levels were all over the place, but the fasting levels were in between 5.5 & 6 and after some metformin tablets (that didnt work) I went onto insulin, which meant i was induced at 38wks.... I don't mind going on Insulin, but the induction was a horrible experience, & Matilda although full term had weaker lungs, & more problems adjusting then what my DS who was a 41 weeker... I just want to cook this one as long as i can & go into labour naturally... & i have stuck to the diet & my "after food levels" are perfect under 6.8, but my "fasting levels" are insane!! im supposed to get under 5.5 & i havent gotten under 6 since i was diagnosed a week ago... today my level was 7.5! but my after dinner level was only 5.6 & i didn't eat anything after that... I don't have an appointment scheduled til Monday 4th Nov. Zobie- im not 100% sure about it all but from what I've been told by the Dr, dietitian & endocrinologist is- I have to prick my finger 4x a day to find out my blood sugar level. 1 as soon as I wake up (fasting- as I haven't eaten through the middle of the night & am not supposed to) & the other 3x are 2hrs after main meals. It's my hormones fault and by adding extra meals my i wouldn't be releasing enough insulin, quick enough to lower my levels to overcompensate for the extra food. In saying that I tried having a few snacks throughout the night, I've also tried a later/earlier dinner & even a later/earlier wake up time and they don't have any effect on my morning (fasting) levels :'( Wow you ladies sound like you are doing awesome!!! Im on 55 units of Humalog (needle before breakfast, lunch, and dinner) and 22 untis of Protophane before bed. I am yet to have anything below 7!!! I a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Blood Sugar Numbers

Gestational Diabetes - Blood Sugar Numbers

That's totally normal. It seems like every province has slightly different guidelines. I have to take mine (I'm in BC) 1 hour after and the range is 5.2-7.2. By two hours after the range is 4.0-5.2. It gets really confusing because the guidelines across country are different and are massively different from any US info. The tolerance test looks at your fasting, which depends on other factors. When i had my test my fasting was the one that was slightly out of line (5.1 and need 5.0 to pass) but everything big else was totally normal, including the rest of the test results. With GD you will commonly have some results in line, and others out of line. Hopefully that's not overly confusing I'm also in BC and I was diagnosed GD and my goals are 5.2 or under for my morning fasting number and before any meal and then I test one hour after I first start eating and that number must be under 7.8. I don't test for the two hours after eating. I test 6 times a day. I have not been able to control my fasting number with diet sadly :( so I will be put on insulin once a day - at night - tomorrow. I'm think your numbers seem fine currently. Not too low. My low is usually 4.2 - 4.4. When you haven't eaten for a period of time... Your liver dumps random amounts of sugar into your bloodstream. Which is why you are supposed to avoid your liver doing that for you by eating a certain amount of carbs. This is also why you are supposed to eat 6 times a day. To be in control of the sugars your body needs. After a meal shows how well your cells are tolerating insulin. With pregnancy, hormones can tend to block insulin. So the better your numbers are after a meal means your body is working with the insulin well enough. The most common issue is your overnight fasting. It's hard to control your live Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know By: Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is never part of any moms plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, Im going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why its important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). Ill also be sharing why the typicalgestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as insulin resistance or carbohydrate intolerance during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter description because, at the end of the day, gestational diabetes is the result of insulin resistance, which means a woman is unable to tolerate large amounts of carbohydrates without experiencing high blood sugar. Technically all women experience some degree of insulin resistance during pregnancy as its a natural metabolic shift that serves to shunt glucose and nutrients to a growing baby.[ 1 ] This means, even if you havent been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, its helpful to understand how and why your metabolism changes during pregnancy (and how cert Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Copyright © 1998 [email protected] All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your health provider. This particular web section is designed to help present some ideas for coping with/preventing higher readings. It should be re-emphasized that nothing herein should be considered medical advice. Contents What to Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What If You Just Have a High Reading, Without Any Real Rhyme or Reason? What Then? What If My Fasting Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? What If My Post-Meal Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? Trouble-Shooting High Readings: Some Ideas What To Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What do you do if you get a higher reading than you are supposed to? First off, don't panic. There are any number of factors that can cause an incorrectly high reading, and you need to rule these out before confirming the high reading. Always re-test to confirm a high number! You need to know if there was an error of some kind. The very first thing you do if you get a high number is to go wash your hands thoroughly and then re-test. Any bits of food on your fingers can significantly affect your numbers. A residue of juice or a drop of fruit pulp on your hand could elevate your readings tremendously. Other substances on your hands might also possibly affect your readings, so washing your hands really well before doing a reading is very, very important. (Kmom's story: I had a couple of readings that were high; upon reflection I realized that I had been cutting up grapes for my toddler before the measurement and gotten busy and forgotten to wash my hands before testing. Wh Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Tips Or Tricks For Lowering Fasting Morning Glucose Levels Without Resorting To Insulin? May 15, 2006 10:05 Am Subscribe

Tips Or Tricks For Lowering Fasting Morning Glucose Levels Without Resorting To Insulin? May 15, 2006 10:05 Am Subscribe

Tips or tricks for lowering fasting morning glucose levels without resorting to insulin? Yes, yes, I know ... see my doctor, etc. etc. etc. I'm getting quality medical care, I just want more opinions, and maybe some non-traditional approaches. Short form: I may or may not have gestational diabetes. My 1 hour and 3 hour glucose tollerance tests were extremely high, but there is some debate as to whether the after effects of a recent severe illness may account for some of that. My blood glucose levels are fine during the day (always below 120 tested 2 hours postprandial, provided I don't eat anything stupid) but when I test in the morning my levels are between 102 - 115 (most often 107). If I'm not able to drop those morning fasting levels down to about 95 in the next few days, I'm going to have to start taking insulin in the evenings, with the end result that I'll have to leave my current midwife's practice and get an OB and give birth at a hospital rather than at the birth center where I'm currently a client. I'm pretty desperate to avoid this if at all possible. My diabetes councelor has advised me to try eating a snack directly before bed that is mainly protein (peanut butter or chicken, etc), and exercising right before bed. I'm going to do both of these, but was wondering if any diabetic or medical type metafilter folks had any other suggestions, either for diet suppliments or other diet-related approaches that have worked for them. I am currently adding 1 teaspoon of cinnamon to my diet daily as seen in this study and it does seem to help... I'm no doctor, but I am diabetic, and I'd second-guess some of what you're being told. Your blood glucose levels are a little high for a non-diabetic, but they're very low for a diabetic. You seem to be borderline. I'd say you Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

High Fasting Levels - Gestational Diabetes - Babycenter Australia

High Fasting Levels - Gestational Diabetes - Babycenter Australia

Get expert guidance from the world's #1 pregnancy and parenting resource, delivered via email, our app, and website. We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the Health On the Net Foundation . Verify here . All contents copyright BabyCenter, L.L.C. 1997-2019 All rights reserved. This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a doctor or other healthcare professional. Please review the Terms of Use before using this site. Your use of the site indicates your agreement to be bound by the Terms of Use . This site is published by BabyCenter, L.L.C., which is responsible for its contents as further described and qualified in the Terms of Use . Support for your parenting journey. Delivered to your inbox. Keep up with your babys development with personalised weekly newsletters. Get the latest parenting news, plus expert advice and real-world wisdom. Receive discounts, deals and parenting information from BabyCenters partners. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes~high Fasting Levels

Gestational Diabetes~high Fasting Levels

I found out I had GD after I failed both my 1hr & 3hr glucose test. This is my 3rd PG and I didn't have GD with my other two. I also test 4/day every day. But after my 2 week follow-up with the Diabetes Nurse, my numbers were so good that she said I only had to check twice a week. But I've decided to continue to test 4/day anyway just because. My doc wants me under 95 for my morning fasting numbers and she would allow up to 105 before she showed any concerns. I think the highest reading I got for morning was 101 but I had a huge carb intake for dinner and was 159 after 2 hours the night before. I guess Chinese food doesn't agree with my GD! But for the most part I'm always under 95. People say a snack with a mix of carbs and protein right before bed will control your sugars throughout the night. I'll have a glass of milk before bed if I'm hungry. Or some suggest milk and half a sandwhich, or nuts with a piece of cheese. I tend to eat dinner late so I haven't had much for evening snacks. I really hope you don't have to continue with the meds. I'd be scared too. I think just watch your numbers and try different things to see what works for you. I had gestational diabetes during my second pregnancy, and my fasting sugars is what originally landed me on medication for it. I found the best way to control my fasting sugars was to eat a protein heavy snack right before I went to bed, and to do some simple exercises. It helped a little until my sugars just got too out of control. Mine started being over 100 consistently. I am 26 weeks and just found out that I have GD with this pregnancy did not have it with my 1st child so a little surprised this time around and a little concerned too not sure the effect on the baby or on my kidney. I guess the brightside is it is only until Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

High Fasting Levels

High Fasting Levels

High fasting levels are a huge problem for many ladies. Fasting blood sugar levels, levels taken first thing in the morning when you wake up, are the hardest thing to control with gestational diabetes. But why is that? When we're sleeping we are not eating and drinking and we are not active and so the body is left to it's own devices with regards to controlling blood sugar levels. Impacts on fasting blood sugar levels Many things can impact fasting levels: what you've eaten earlier in the evening when you last ate hydration levels how well you've slept the dawn phenomenon the Somogyi effect What you ate earlier in the evening Bearing in mind how much of each food group converts to glucose in the bloodstream and the time taken, your fasting levels may be impacted by this. Too much carbohydrate in your evening meal or as a snack before bed can contribute to high fasting levels, as your body can only produce or use so much insulin, so if you raise your blood sugars too high by eating too much carbohydrate, your body can spend the night battling to try to lower your blood sugar levels. A high fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels and so eating a well paired evening meal is important. When you last ate The key to stabilising blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Hydration levels Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body and so it is important to stay well h Continue reading >>

Fasting Numbers Keep Going Up Even With Increasing Insulin. Help!

Fasting Numbers Keep Going Up Even With Increasing Insulin. Help!

Fasting numbers keep going up even with increasing insulin. HELP! My fasting #'s have always been an issue (always in the 110 range). So we started with insulin at night before bed and having a carb/protein snack. My bedtime readings are always great (110ish). But slowly my fasting #'s have started to increase and be higher than my bedtime #'s. So my doc has been slowly increasing my bedtime units. The higher the units the higher my fasting #'s. What the heck is going on???? Yesterday after increasing to 8 units I was 119 fasting. This morning after increasing to 12 units I am 135???? I am having the exact same problem. Im now 29w and am at 30 units at night and still cannot get a number under 90. My docs ultimately want the fasting number between 72-85. Its so frustrating because I feel like I'm following rules but just can't keep it under control. They said the further along the more your numbers will rise then start to taper off about 36w. It's completely normal to experience the fasting number struggle like you are. This is my second pregnancy with early onset GD. I started nighttime insulin at 8 weeks this pregnancy and I'm currently 25 weeks and on 45 units. I found that eating a bowl of regular ice cream at bed has helped my fasting numbers. My endocrinologist advised me that there is often a hormone release during the night and that's why the fasting numbers can be the hardest to control. My fasting numbers keep creeping up too. I used to be 90s and now I'm over 100. This morning 102. And I was SO hungry. I'm not on meds or insulin but I'm starting to worry they will put me on them soon. They say medication would be the next step. I'm so worried about the side effects and it hurting baby ugh. I'm only 28 weeks! We are just going to keep upping my dose until my Continue reading >>

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