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Gestational Diabetes Diet Menu Ideas

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes - Indian Diet Recipe For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Recipes - Indian Diet Recipe For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes recipes a list of the best recipes that may be suitable for women with gestational diabetes. For safety reasons, please consult your dietitian before you consume any of these foods. Iam also sharing an easy Veg Brown Rice Recipe for gestational diabetics in this post. Gestational diabetes is on an alarming rise in young Indian women, especially residing in the cities. I have been seeing countless number of women suffering from this condition during their pregnancies, some lead to complications and few can manage it very well with their diet. A good friend of mine is diagnosed with Gestational diabetes in her early months of pregnancy and is striving hard to be on a good diet that is gestational diabetic friendly. Tthe main focus is on the protein, as it is crucial for the development of the baby. She visits the dietician monthly to get a sketch of what she can eat. I could not see her suffering with lack of food ideas, as she is a foodie. We failed to find any Indian recipes that were specifically developed for GD. Based on what is considered to be the best for diabetics, I have developed few recipes for her so that she can have a hearty and contented meal during these crucial days. I tried all these recipes at least twice to ensure that they are fit to be consumed by a Gestational Diabetic. Most recipes have worked well in keeping her blood sugar levels controlled. So I have thought of treasuring these on Swasthis recipes index. If you desire to try this for your Gestational diabetic or diabetic loved ones and are skeptical about the suitability, you can get a dieticians view on it. Most brown rice recipes can be a Gestational diabetic friendly, but how many of us like to eat brown rice when it is cooked on stove top. Either it is undercooked or t Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Do I have to watch what I eat? Yes. Eating well helps all women stay healthy during pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes, choosing the right food to eat is even more important. That's because many women with gestational diabetes can manage their condition by following a healthy eating plan, monitoring their blood sugar, and exercising regularly. Keeping your blood sugar stable by eating healthy food and exercising makes it less likely that you'll need medication to control your condition. You and your baby are also less likely to have any complications from your condition. Watching what you eat also helps you gain a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy. If you were overweight before becoming pregnant, your healthcare provider may recommend limiting calories so you don't gain too much as your baby grows. Do I need to monitor carbohydrates? Yes. The amount and type of carbohydrates (natural starches and sugars) in food affects your blood sugar levels. And with gestational diabetes, you'll need to track your carbohydrate intake in particular. Setting a limit on the amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal is the first step to managing your blood sugar. Your provider is likely to recommend reducing the total amount of carbohydrates to about 40 percent of your daily calories. Try to eat carbohydrates that are high in fiber. Fibrous foods are harder to digest. Whole grains are high in fiber, so choosing brown rice and whole grain bread instead of refined versions (white bread and rice) means that they take longer to digest and release sugar more slowly into your bloodstream. Vegetables, beans, lentils, and chickpeas are also high in fiber and release sugar into your blood slowly. Avoid food and drinks that are high in added sug Continue reading >>

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes

Meal Ideas For Gestational Diabetes

Well I failed the 3 hour test today.... I didn't even make it past the fasting ***. I failed so bad that I was diagnosed right then. I don't get to see my doctor until Monday. What can I expect? Did you ladies have an ultrasound to check the baby's weight? I am not sure what to eat. I need to bring my lunch to work so I need some easy meal ideas. I am not much of a cook and I am actually pretty picky. So this should be interesting for me! @mommyof2beauties2010 I have GD as well. For lunch ideas, you might consider low carb bread for sandwiches, or also Weight Watchers or Lean Cuisine meals that are low in carbs. For supper, we grill a lot, and eat a lot of fresh veggies. Summer is a good time (not that any time is a good time, but it is better than winter, I guess) to have GD because of all the fresh produce available! I got diagnosed about 3 weeks ago and know how frustrated the meal planning can be, especially for a picky eater! Right now for lunch I'm supposed to have 4-5 servings of carbs so I've been eating wraps (the tortillas I buy are 30 carbs each or 2 servings, plus meat, cheese, & veggies are all carb free, ranch dressing has negligible amounts of carbs so I don't even bother counting it). With that I can then have some chips or something to make up another 2 servings of carbs, or I'll just do two of them. The nice thing about the wraps is you can put as much meat on there as you want & as much veggies as you like. I'm not much of a veggie eater, so I've been doing cucumbers, lettuce, and red onion. For supper I'm also supposed to have 4-5 servings of carbs also, so usually I'll grill a cheeseburger (big hamburger buns are 2 servings of carbs, again meat & cheese don't count) and I'll find something to eat along with it, plus I'll have a salad or some raw ve Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Tetra Images/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images The food cravings and aversions of pregnancy often make meal planning and eating a bit more complicated, and gestational diabetes only adds to this complexity. When it comes to meal ideas and recipes, a woman with gestational diabetes needs tobe most mindful of carbohydrates, which is the nutrient that impacts blood sugars the most. Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Diabetes means that glucose (sugar) levels in a person's bloodstream are too high. Normally, the hormone insulin , which is produced by an organ called the pancreas, absorbs and uses glucose that comes from your food. During pregnancy, though, a woman's hormones make it difficult for her to use insulin (this is called insulin resistance). In other words, she has to use a lot more insulin, up to three times as much, to bring down glucose levels in the blood. In some pregnant women (around 9 percent, according to the American Diabetes Association) their body cannot make enough insulin to keep their glucose levels within the normal rangethis condition is called gestational diabetes. In order to control blood sugar, women with gestational diabetes need to follow a carbohydrate-controlled diet. Sometimes, if a diet is not enough to control blood glucose levels, a woman may need to also take insulin or an oral medication like metformin . When planning your meals (under the guidance of your healthcare team), there are a couple tidbits to keep in mind. One is that your sensitivity and reactivity to carbohydrates may increase as your pregnancy progresses. Also, pregnancy with diabetes can make big demands on time which can influence your ability to preparehome-made meals. Thi Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

You are here: Home / Gestational Diabetes / Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas We are finally getting down to the end of my pregnancy which also means the end of gestational diabetes! Hurrah! Unlike most women who are diagnosed around their third trimester I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 11 weeks (due to a high family history of diabetes), so what Im saying is, Ive had a lot of practice at the gestational diabetes diet. One really positive thing about having gestational diabetes is it basically forces you to have a healthy pregnancy. So far I am 37 weeks and have gained not quite 10 pounds. (ie my body is losing weight while the baby is gaining weight) Im also having a much more active pregnancy, even though I dont do a lot of traditional workouts I walk 1-2 miles a day and I think in general chasing after a preschooler AND toddler has kept me moving. Please note: My carb and calorie counts were given to me by a dietician based on my glucose numbers. They are completely individual and for example only. Do NOT self-diagnose or undertake any dietary changes while pregnant without first consulting your doctor. Oatmeal with 1/2 cup berries and 1/2 scoop of protein powder 0 Fat Greek yogurt with 1/2 cup berries and 1/4 cup multigrain Cheerios 2 pieces Ezekiel toast with peanut butter Peanut Butter Chocolate shake: 1/2 banana, scoop of chocolate protein powder, 8 oz almond milk, 1 Teaspoon peanut butter, 6 pieces ice. Strawberrysmoothie: 1 cup strawberries or mixed berries, 1/2 cup Greek yogurt, 8 ounces almond milk, scoop of vanilla protein powder, 1 cup spinach (optional), ice as needed. Lean ground turkey sausage has been a lifesaver as well. 0 carbs and really filling! I pretty much add a patty or two to any breakfast for extra protein. I do go through phases w Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Sample Diets For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diets For Gestational Diabetes

Quick and Easy Lunches for Gestational Diabetes By the time lunch hits for many women with gestational diabetes, you might be ready to consume anything in sight. I have to make sure to eat a mid-morning snack to keep my energy up and blood sugar from going too low, which can result in craving sugar and carbs. If I don't have a snack, come lunchtime I'm ready to devour everything in sight! There are many healthy options for quick and easy lunch menus for women with gestational diabetes without succumbing to the lures of the carb laden value meals at the fast food drive through. The key is having staples on hand to pack for work or grab quickly at home when you are hungry for an easy lunch. Staples for quick, easy, and healthful lunches include: 1. Single servings if whole grains, such as whole grain breads, wild and brown rice, whole grain or wheat crackers, low carb wheat tortillas, and whole grain pastas. To make pasta and rice lunch-friendly, cook a moderate amount and then freeze in 1/3 cup (1 carb option) or 2/3 cup (2 carb choices) serving sizes to reheat. (Whole grains are lower on the glycemic index, so they will give you and your baby good nutrition without making your blood sugar rise quickly). 2. Quick protein sources such as cooked chicken, turkey, or lean beef, low-fat cheese, low fat cottage cheese, eggs, peanut butter and nuts, and quick meats like turkey hot dogs or deli lunch meats. Pre-cooked turkey bacon or sausage can also be crumbled and added to salads, wraps, and other dishes. (Caution: Remember to cook hot dogs and lunch meats until steaming to avoid the risk of listeria, a potentially harmful bacteria). 3. Fresh veggies: pre-cut salads, pre-washed spinach, and bagged ready-to-eat veggies can be convenient for lunches. To save money, wash and cut Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal IdeasPhoto Credit: ginew/iStock/Getty Images Teresa Cantilli has been working as a Registered Dietitian for 18 years. She is a Certified Diabetes Educator and an ACE Certified Personal Trainer. She earned her Master's Degree in Clinical Nutrition from the New York Institute of Technology. Her work has appeared in The New Standard Newsletter for the NSLIJHS, where she has been working for 10 years, and the book "Migraine Expressions." Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. This disorder, characterized by elevated blood sugar levels, is usually diagnosed between 24 and 28 weeks gestation. The cornerstones of managing GDM include regular physical activity and a nutritious, well balanced diet that controls the amount of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. While its essential for women with GDM to meet with a dietitian to receive a meal plan that takes individual calorie and nutrient needs into account, sample menu ideas can provide ideas to get started before this dietitian visit. A healthy diet is an important part of any pregnancy. For women with GDM, a nutritious, balanced diet promotes adequate weight gain and optimal fetal growth -- and also helps manage blood sugar levels. Because carbohydrate foods such as breads, grains, fruit, milk, starchy vegetables and desserts impact blood sugar the most, women with GDM need to ensure they are spreading these foods throughout the day, and limiting added sugars, desserts, and other sweets. Also, women with GDM are encouraged to eat every 2 to 3 hours -- typically 3 meals and 3 snacks daily -- to control blood sugars and provide necessary nourishment. Carbohydrate-containing foods are converted to glucose or sugar in the body, and insulin is necessary to remove e Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S Which foods are considered carbohydrates? For your meal plan, only a few types of foods are counted as carbs — starches, fruits, dairy, and non-starchy vegetables. The Food Finder chart on page 3 gives examples and portion sizes for these types of foods. Should I aim for a very low carb diet — like the Atkins diet? No. You (and your baby) need carbohydrates to stay healthy. Follow your meal plan to know when and how much carbohydrate to include in your meals and snacks. Do I need to count calories? It depends. Some women with GDM need to count calories, but many others don’t. Your meal plan will list all of the targets you need to aim for — and your healthcare provider can answer any questions. How do I know if my eating plan is working to control my GDM? A healthcare provider will show you how to test your blood glucose several times a day. Your testing results will show how well your GDM is controlled and whether your treatment should be adjusted. You’ll also be checked during your regular prenatal visits. Use the Food Finder meal planner to help you control your GDM, nourish your growing baby, and keep you feeling good. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Meal Plan Why do I need a GDM meal plan? If you have gestational [je-STEY-shuhn-uhl] diabetes mellitus (GDM), you and your developing baby are likely to have high blood glucose (too much glucose — or “sugarâ€â€” in the blood). This can cause problems for both of you during the pregnancy, during delivery, and in the years to come. Following a meal plan is one of the most important ways to help control your blood glucose and lower health risks. Your healthcare provider will help you decide on a Continue reading >>

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to change how you eat. The following sample diet is designed to serve as a framework for your daily meal plans. Gestational diabetes can be completely and effectively controlled with diet alone. Most oral hypoglycemic medications are not recommended during this delicate time, so it is important to discuss your diet plans with a nutritionist or your healthcare provider. Using Diet to Control Blood Glucose Levels During pregnancy, it is critical to maintain healthy blood sugar levels throughout the day and evening. According to MedlinePlus , doctors typically conduct screening for gestational diabetes between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. Your fasting glucose needs to be less than 95 milligrams/deciliter, and a two-hour postprandial (after meal) reading needs to be less than 155 milligrams/deciliter. If your doctor tells you that your blood glucose level is too high, you may need to make healthy eating habits and smart food choices even more of a priority during your pregnancy. While caloric requirements are highly individualized, the average women with an appropriate weight prior to conception needs an additional 100 to 300 calories during the second and third trimester. For any pregnant woman, these calories need to contain quality nutrition loaded with essential vitamins and minerals to support a healthy pregnancy and outcome. If you have gestational diabetes, you'll need to eat to keep your blood sugar at the level your doctor recommends. Keep these additional tips in mind as you follow your doctor's recommended diet for controlling your gestational diabetes: If you have gestational diabetes, you should also include plenty of fluid as part of your diet. While fruit and vegetable juices are acceptable, it is best n Continue reading >>

Eating Well

Eating Well

We hope that the following practical information on eating and staying well will help you feel positive and encouraged to stick to the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet. The GDM diet is basically a really healthy way of eating which can benefit the whole family. Read on for tips on everything from exercising, eating cake and dealing with hunger. Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator What about exercise? What’s the deal with carbs? So you’ve just found out that you need to manage your daily carbohydrate (carb) intake. This can be a little tricky. Carbs are now a problem for you but also the solution. You need carbs and your baby needs carbs. Carbohydrates are our energy food. They are contained in many important food groups i.e. bread and cereals, fruits, vegetables and dairy. You can’t just cut them out or your diet would end up unbalanced and insufficient but too much of them means too much glucose in your bloodstream. The answer is this. You need to eat a consistent and moderate amount of carbs regularly through the day. Timing: Ideally you should be eating every 2.5-3hrs. Leaving a much longer gap means you might get too hungry and want to eat more when you finally do eat. Eating every hour means your body is going to find it too hard to keep processing all the time. Try having 3 meals and 3 small snacks through the day. These should be at times of the day that suit you. Type & Amount: Choose nutritious or high-fibre carbs i.e. wholegrain breads and crackers, pasta, starchy vegetables such as corn and potato, legumes, low fat dairy milk and yoghurt and fruit. A fist-sized amount of carbohydrate is a good rule of thumb to go by until you see a dietitian. This is usually equal to about a standard cup measure (2 Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

This post contains affiliate links. This means that I make a small commission off of purchases made through my links at no extra charge to you. All opinions are my own. When I was pregnant with Bensen, my biggest struggle came when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Some women cry when their regular clothes don't fit anymore, I cried when my carb intake became drastically limited and I realized just how many high carb foods I enjoy. I knew going into that pregnancy that I was at risk for GD because I was pre-diabetic, a little overweight and have a family history of Type II diabetes, but getting that confirmation that I indeed had it was rough for me. I'm here to tell you that I survived and that six weeks postpartum, I was healthier than I'd been when I first got pregnant! My diagnosis came the week of Valentine's Day, so my loving husband changed his plans for our celebration. Instead of going to our favorite pasta restaurant, stuffing ourselves silly, and then coming home to lounge on the couch in front of a movie, he planned and prepared a low carb dinner at home and then we went for a walk. It meant a lot to me because I knew how much time and effort he'd put into researching and preparing our meal, and also how much of a sacrifice it was for him to eat the same thing that I was eating and nothing more. He told me later that he was hungry within a couple of hours because the meal just wasn't filling enough for him. During those last two months of my pregnancy, I learned to love vegetables and eat foods that I never would have considered in the past. After a few weeks of testing my blood sugar levels before and after each meal, I learned what I needed to eat and do to keep them level throughout the day. Some days were better than others, but I was diligent a Continue reading >>

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