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Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed At 35 Weeks

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is a medical condition that causes high blood glucose (blood sugar). When there is too much sugar in the blood, it can cause health problems. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body regulate glucose levels in the blood. When there isn’t enough insulin or the body can’t use it properly, blood sugar levels can get too high. Diabetes that develops during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. It can cause health problems for both the mother and her developing baby during the pregnancy, and it may cause problems after birth. For example, when a mother’s blood sugar levels are too high, the baby's development may be delayed. The baby could also grow very large, which may make a C-section delivery necessary. All pregnant women will be tested for gestational diabetes at some point during the pregnancy. If mothers have risk factors, like age or weight problems, being pregnant with multiples, significant family history of diabetes or having gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, they may be tested earlier and more often than women without additional risk factors. Diagnosing gestational diabetes All pregnant women will be screened for gestational diabetes. Most health care providers recommend a glucose screening test between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. When women have risk factors for gestational diabetes, the test may be done in the first trimester. If this test shows an increased blood sugar level, a three-hour glucose tolerance test may be done after a few days of following a special diet. If results of the second test are in the abnormal range, gestational diabetes is diagnosed. Once diagnosed, your doctor will likely recommend counseling that shows you how to eat properly and test your own blood sugar up to fo Continue reading >>

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

(links marked * are affiliate links, for more info see disclaimer below post) Well: this gestational diabetes thing has thrown a right spanner in the old works, I can tell you! (Photo above taken in last pregnancy, by the way, after I had polished off two whole desserts. I thought it was brilliantly inappropriate.) I just feel as though Ive been diagnosed (my blood sugar readings, though not horrific, definitely indicate GD) and then left just to get on with things. No real advice, no explanations as to how the condition could affect the baby, or (more my concern) how my rampantly out-of-control blood sugar levels prior to diagnosis might have affected the baby So it has been a crazy week or so of intense Google research, and speaking to my Dad and Uncle about how they keep their Type 2 Diabetes in check, and chatting to my oldest friend Tasha about how she coped during her two pregnancies with her Type 1 Diabetes. Id like to say that it has all been very interesting, and it has to a certain extent, but overall my one word to describe the situation would be: STRESSFUL. Mainly, I think, because the diagnosis has been made so late. (Im 38 weeks.) And wouldnt have been madeat allhad I not sought a second opinion about baby size from a private obstetrician. (Always trust your instincts, people.) So Im slightly consumedwith low-level fury about the fact that I wasnt given a fasting blood sugar test, despite the fact that my last baby was big and I have an immediate relative with diabetes, but Im also frustrated and confused because keeping blood sugar under control is actually quite the learning curve, and Ive been given approximately 14 days altogether to achieve it. In case you are wondering what the hell Im on about, Gestational Diabetes is a specific kind of diabetes th Continue reading >>

Bump & Gestational Diabetes Update: Week 35

Bump & Gestational Diabetes Update: Week 35

Bump & Gestational Diabetes Update: Week 35 Clothes:I feel like I keep recycling the same few outfits. The problem is that the longer I go without buying any maternity clothes, the more of a waste it seems to buy them now. Body changes: A growing belly. And my belly button is looking really funky. Although, it didnt pop out with Max and I dont think itll pop this time either. Symptoms:Im feeling soooo uncomfortable andover it at this point. This is going to be an excruciatingly long month. Like, in my mind, I want Bean to cook as long as she needs. But at the same time, I really want her to choose an early exit (anytime after 37 weeks). Please. Food cravings: Im a sucker for sour candy, which I havent had any of since I got diagnosed with GD. However,I can have ice cream (something about the protein/fat/carb ratio) so Ive been trying to satisfy my sweet tooth cravings with that. Sleep: Sleep sucks. Especially when you cant fall asleep, wake up 2-3x to pee when you finally do sleep, get woken up by Max in the wee hours of the morning because hes going through a sleep regression, and then said toddler refuses to go back to sleep. 1. Major breakthrough with potty training Max ! We were able to go on two separate outings (the park and a restaurant) with zero mistakes! Mr. C and I tend to stress out (always only in retrospect,unnecessarily) and think the worst will happen. Mr. C tookMax to pee about every 30 minutes and Max always obliged. I seriously couldnt be happier. Ive been reading that a lot of potty regressions occur when a new baby comes along. I fully expect that may happen but, at least, Max will have the foundation in place. sitting outside the restaurant because toddlers get antsy 2. I had a growth scan and Bean grew a whopping 14oz in two weeks! She is still t Continue reading >>

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes At 35w - So Frustrated By Lack Of Support/information12

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes At 35w - So Frustrated By Lack Of Support/information12

Had a late GTT at 35 weeks (MW only just noticed I have PCOS and my 2nd DC was 9lbs 13), my levels 2hrs post drink were 8.3 so a diagnosis of GD was made. Have got two DCs, had two very straightforward homebirths with no problems- DC2 was a 2.5hr labour and 9lbs 13oz (no issues with pushing him out or shoulder dystocia etc). My issue is this, I have been given no info about what to do because apparently as I am 35weeks and 'nothing can be done bar a fasting test 6 weeks post birth'. No referral to a dietician or consultant etc. I've scared myself silly by scouring the internet for info re: higher risk of stillbirth, pre eclampsia etc etc Have put myself on a no sugar/GI diet as that seems to be the recommended course of action. says birth shopuld be ok if levels well maintained but I have not been asked to check levels thus have no idea if they will be maintained!!! With regards to the birth I have a serious health anxiety/emetophobia/hospital phobia hence choosing HBs previously so this is a massive deal for me. I noted that the like to induce between 38 and 40weeks but hell will freeze over before I go down the induction route (cascade of intervention and higher likelhood of a c-sec etc). What have been your experiences, any advice etc?? I had my GTT at 28 weeks, and came back just over the limit, was 7.9 cut off is 7.8, so not as high as yours. But I got called into the hospital the following week and got given a finger pricking thing to test my levels 4 times a day. They have not been to bad, but I have still had 2 extra growth scans and have another one at 36 weeks. Have they offered you any of this? I would have thought you should have at least had the growth scans. I have been told even though my GD is being controlled without medication, baby has to be born in Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes, Why Should I Be Concerned?

Gestational Diabetes, Why Should I Be Concerned?

All Communities > Stay at Home Moms > Gestational Diabetes, why should I be concerned? Gestational Diabetes, why should I be concerned? Theresa - posted on 08/17/2009 ( 8 moms have responded ) Today I was diagnosed with Gestational diabetes and because doctors exaggerate everything I am doing research on it and asking others mothers why they may think I should be concerned? , I am 35 weeks pregnant I have been a diabetic for 25 years (and I am 27!). Gestational diabetes is basically the same risk factors as a regular diabetic. It can cause everything from more fluid around the baby to death for the baby if not taken care of. (There is a really broad scope on that, and many have already been mentioned) Make sure you are seeing a perinatologist (a OB specialist) and sending your blood sugars to them 2x per week. Test before each meal and 1-2 hours after each meal so they can see what is going on. Stay away from sugars and watch how many carbs you are getting. They will probably want to induce 1-2 weeks early. Possibly earlier if things are not under control. They will want you to try a natural delivery, but it may come down to needing a c-section if the baby grows too big. My boys were both decent sized, but not larges for a diabetic. One was 7lbs 8 oz, the other was 9lbs 8oz. Good luck! If you need help, let me know, an I can offer some ideas possibly. If nohing else, a listening ear :) Continue reading >>

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect This mom found out late in her pregnancy that she had gestational diabetes and was shocked and in denial over her diagnosis, until she found the silver lining. I'd never failed a test in my whole life, and the very thought used to give me nightmares at school. That all changed when I was pregnant with my first baby. I failed the one-hour sugar test that screens expectant moms for gestational diabetes . And though I passed the subsequent three-hour version, I failed both of them again later in my pregnancy by just a number or two. It was confirmed, according to my doctor: I had GD. To say I was stunned and terribly upset would be an understatement. I'd been lucky enough to get pregnant over the age of 35 with no trouble at all, and things had been going so smoothly until then. I wasn't overweight and didn't have a history of diabetes in my family. I was exercising regularly, eating healthily, and had tons of energy. My only risk factor for gestational diabetes was my age, and I had no symptoms. So how could this be happening to me? I listened numbly over the phone as my OB delivered the bad news and informed me of what I had to do. I honestly couldn't believe it. The results had to be wrong. Maybe they got my sample mixed up with someone else's in the lab? Or maybe my doctor was being overzealous because of how old I was. Plus, I'd passed the three-hour screening earlier on. Wasn't that enough? I told her how upset I was and expressed my doubts about the accuracy of the diagnosis. She listened, but firmly stuck to her read of my condition. Eventually, I realized I had no choice but to accept it and do everything I was told to do. I had to pri Continue reading >>

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

By week 37 of pregnancy, a woman has likely been managing her gestational diabetes for about nine weeks. Blood tests for the condition are performed at the beginning of the third trimester, around 28 weeks. Although gestational diabetes does place women in a higher pregnancy risk category, the condition can be managed with careful vigilance. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says that between two and 10 percent of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes annually. The ACOG defines gestational diabetes as excess levels of glucose in the blood. Excess glucose occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to convert glucose into energy. The condition comes and goes with pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes with one pregnancy are more likely to develop it in subsequent pregnancies. The ACOG says that up to one half of them will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diet, exercise and, occasionally, medication are key to gestational diabetes control. Patients need to avoid refined carbohydrates, sugar and caffeine and maintain a regimen of either swimming, walking or prenatal yoga. Insulin shots are sometimes necessary. If gestational diabetes is not controlled, serious complications may occur. They include premature birth; preeclampsia, or abnormally high maternal blood pressure; respiratory distress syndrome, or difficulties with baby’s breathing at birth; birth defects; and macrosomia, or an extremely large baby. According to Midwifery Today, the baby can go into diabetic shock and die during birth in cases of improper disease management. By 37 weeks, women with gestational diabetes will be checked weekly. Because of the risks of preeclampsia and macrosomia, these women have a slightly higher chance of delivering their ba Continue reading >>

Early Induction Due To Gestational Diabetes/big Baby - Anyone?

Early Induction Due To Gestational Diabetes/big Baby - Anyone?

Early Induction due to Gestational Diabetes/Big Baby - Anyone? I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes just after 28 weeks and after following the strict diet my levels were still not coming down so I am currently on insulin twice a day. I am back at clinic tomorrow and suspect insulin will be upped again as my levels are still high. At my last growth scan (I was 30+4) my baby was estimated to weigh 5lb 9oz already and the abdominal circumference was above 97th centile. The obstetrician said 'umm we have a very big baby here' and seemed concerned, he was nice but not all the chatty so didn't talk much. I am due to be scanned again in a weeks time when I will be 32+4 to see how the growth is going but I am feeling pretty scared about what to expect, especially as my bs levels are not under control yet. The consultant did say that they do not let gd ladies go to term when big babies are suspected but I have no idea at this point when they are thinking, does it depend on how things go? I wondered if anyone has been induced earlier than 38 weeks due to GD or a big baby??? I was induced with my son at 36+4 due to pre-eclampsia and he was a healthy 6lb 8oz. Part of the reason I am asking is because I have a trapped sciatic nerve and achy pelvis that makes it very difficult for me to stand or walk for more than 10-15 mins and of course carrying this weight is making it much harder. I'm not sure how this will impact the labour either but I would rather avoid a c-section as I am overweight I hear there are more risks??? Plus I hear doctors try to avoid c-sections with overweight ladies??? Turned into a long one sorry, just wondered if anyone had any advice or experience etc? I have GD and I'm on insulin 4 times a day and big doses to try and get my levels down. At my last two Continue reading >>

Test At 36 Weeks - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Test At 36 Weeks - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Hi all, I was tested for GD at 36 weeks pregnant because my scan showed that the baby was measuring big. I won't get the results for another week at which point I will be 37 weeks. Just wondering if any of you ladies have a diet plan I could think about as I feel that by the time this is picked up it could be too late. Thanks That is so weird they were suppose to do that test around 25-30 weeks. I was diagnosed at 34 weeks but it was my fault because I kept changing my appt because I didn't wanna drink that nasty juice. But my baby weight is perfect and my diet is good. They told me I actually have to gain a little more weight for me lol... but drink lots of water drink crytal light powder juice eat more veggies and just eat smaller portions I'm in the same boat, tested fine at 28 weeks and at 36 told I have Gd. I have been recommended 2-3 units of carbs per main meal . Unit being 15g. And one unit for snacks . Lots of nuts and seeds. And try the low Gi options if available ie brown rice instead of white, whole grains, sweet potato instead of white. Hope that helps!! Seems a little pointless to have you go on a gd diet a few weeks before your baby is born. I don't think it'll help much with the size but it is important that you test after the baby is born to make sure it goes away. I'm in the same boat. Wasn't diagnosed until 34/35 weeks due to work and school schedule. I have my first class Wednesday (36 weeks) where I'll receive my glucometer, then the following Wednesday I'll meet with my doctor for a growth scan. At that point I'll be 37 weeks. I've cut out the occasional soda/ice cream/treats. I think my biggest problem was skipping meals and not snacking enough. Most of the time I only ate two meals a day and one snack. Just wish I had known sooner. So nervous fo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

The latest guidance from NICE, published in 2015, has extended the time by which women with gestational diabetes should give birth to 40 weeks, 6 days – not much less than the general guidance for all pregnant women, which is 42 weeks. If you have not gone to birth at this point, induction of labour will be recommended. "When I was in the hospital, I felt I didn’t know what was going on. I would have liked more information about that part so I could have been better prepared." Gemma, mum of one The main reason for induction is to prevent stillbirth. For all women, the risk increases when their pregnancy goes past 42 weeks. However, one study has shown that women with gestational diabetes may be at risk earlier. So for this reason, the guidance in England and Wales states that if you have gestational diabetes, you should not go beyond 40 weeks, 6 days. An induction or caesarean may also be advised if your baby is very large (macrosomia) – as this may cause difficulties during the birth. On the other hand induction may also be recommended if the team detects poor growth in your baby. In Scotland, most women with diabetes in pregnancy are induced within 40 weeks. The guidance says that this decision should be determined on an individual basis. If you are taking diabetes medication or insulin, it recommends that you should be assessed at 38 weeks and delivered by 40 weeks. Choices you might need to make for labour and birth Most women with gestational diabetes have a healthy birth. But before you make your birth plan, you may need to take some things into account to make sure you and your baby are safe during and after the birth. If you have gestational diabetes, you will have less choice about where to deliver your baby. This is because you will need to deliver your Continue reading >>

35 Week Scare - Gestational Diabetes - The Honest Motherthe Honest Mother

35 Week Scare - Gestational Diabetes - The Honest Motherthe Honest Mother

I recently had my 35 week appointment with the midwife. The appointment was going really well until she measured bump and plotted it on the graph and put a cross above the 95thCentile. I have always measured along the 50th, so this started to raise some concern. Baby had put a lot of weight on since my last appointment. Now I know that I had over indulged over Easter and my weakness has been chocolate during this pregnancy. Had I made my baby overweight with the amount I have consumed? I was told I would have to go for a glucose test for Gestational diabetes. If it came back positive I wouldnt be able to do a water birth or go to a midwife led centre, I would be under a consultant and back at the hospital where I had Jessica. I really didnt want this. I went away feeling deflated, worried and upset I really didnt need this blip to make me feel uneasy, especially at 35 weeks. I had an emergency appointment made for me the next morning which lasted for two hours and I hadnt been allowed to eat anything from 9pm the night before. I had to give blood from my arm at 9am, 10am and 11am. The first of the three tests I had to drink what felt like a gallon of Lucozade; three cups in total. This went straight to my head and babies and she had a rave for the next hour until my second appointment. I then had the come down and felt ever so tired waiting for third test. Due to my thoughts on where and how I want to give birth this time I decided to try to get them to hurry the results along. I really couldnt cope with another sleepless night or even wait a whole day for results. Luckily that afternoon I receive a phone call from the midwife explaining that they had come back fine and there was nothing to worry about. Phew! I know that midwives are only doing their job and have to ta Continue reading >>

35 Weeks And Diagnosed

35 Weeks And Diagnosed

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community advice please - I was referred for a growth scan this week and baby was weigh estimated to be 6lb 8oz so I was referred for a glucose tolerance test. Fasting result was 6.5 (which they said was too high) and after 2 hours 4.5 (which they said was fine). Long term test the reading was 33 - which again they said was fine. Now monitoring bloods 4 times a day from today and booked into see team next week which will put me at 36 weeks. Has anyone else had results like this or so late on in pregnancy? I have Type 1 diabetes not GD, but your figures do sound fine, apart from the fasting one, which is a little higher than ideal (but not dreadfully so, so don't worry too much). It sounds like your doctors/midwives are taking a really good pro-active approach They've checked you for GD and have given you a meter so you can check your blood glucose at home. All good precautions I've been doing my bloods all week. Morning they tend to be around the 5.3 mark or lower and after meals mostly they are below 7.8 but I get the occasional spike of 8.7. They decided as I am 36 weeks there is no time to see if diet can control and have put me on 500mg metformin that I take after breakfast. Bloods in the morning are smiliar to before and after meals they are around the 7.1 mark. However the tablets have made me feel so ill - stomach ache and banging headache! I'm being induced in 2 1/2 weeks and really want to enjoy this last couple of weeks not feels so ill - will the side effects settle down? Hi @Tminor Good news that your sugars aren't too high. Sorry you're having problems with the Metformin. I don't take that, but I do know there is a slow release kind that many peopl Continue reading >>

The Validity Of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test After 36 Weeks' Gestation.

The Validity Of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test After 36 Weeks' Gestation.

1. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2006 Nov;129(1):19-24. Epub 2005 Dec 19. The validity of oral glucose tolerance test after 36 weeks' gestation. Maslovitz S(1), Shimonovitz S, Lessing JB, Hochner-Celnikier D. (1)Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lis Maternity Hospital, Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. [email protected] OBJECTIVE: Secretion of anti-insulin hormones plateaus near term, questioning thevalidity of OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) during that period. We aimed atassessing the feasibility of OGTT near term as compared to OGTT at 26-32 weeks.PATIENTS AND METHODS: One thousand four hundred and eighty seven pregnant womenwere screened by GCT (glucose challenge test), and 282 (19%) of them performed anOGTT at 26th-32nd weeks ("early" OGTT) after meeting the threshold value for GCT.Forty-one women with abnormal and 16 with normal early OGTT underwent a repeated OGTT at 36-40 weeks' gestation ("late" OGTT). Blood glucose levels during GCT andOGTT were compared between women with early and late abnormal OGTT and women who converted from early abnormal to late normal OGTT.RESULTS: Thirty-six out of 41 participants (88%) with early abnormal OGTT hadabnormal test near term as well (Group I). Five women with an early abnormal OGTTconverted to normal according to a late OGTT (Group II). These women had lowerglucose levels on both late and early OGTT as compared with Group I. All 16 womenwho tested normal on early OGTT had a consistently normal late OGTT. Glucoselevels for all 57 women did not significantly differ between early and late OGTT.The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of lateOGTT were 88%, 100%, 100%, and 76%, respectively.CONCLUSION: The positive predictive va Continue reading >>

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