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Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed At 31 Weeks

Is It Too Late To Get Gestational Diabetes Test?

Is It Too Late To Get Gestational Diabetes Test?

Is it too late to get Gestational Diabetes test? Started by mandarins, Jan 19 2011 07:09 PM I am 30 wks pregnant in 2 days. I have not had my GD test done yet but was going to in next few days. I have heard that its suppose to be done between 26 -28 weeks. I dont think im hih risk and neither does my widwife but im still being urged to get it done as they say there are no obvious symptoms. My m/w is away for another week ... is it worth me still getting it done at this stage. I'd be happy not to bother and dont want the hassle of doing it if im too late to get an effective result anyhow. My pathology request form also say I need TFT (thyroid?) HIV (um, really doubt I got that) and Hb Ferritin blood group antibodies - not sure what that bit is? I know a friend of mine didn't have hers until after 30 weeks I think. She ended up having pretty bad GD. (because of work I had trouble scheduling an appointment). I believe the test is usually done earlier so that if you have it they can get it under control. If you have the test now it will still give an accurate result but obviously it could mean you may have had it undiagnosed for a while. I had mine at 32 weeks because I knew it was completely unnecessary. Only reason I did it in the end was they told me they would refuse me to deliver in the hospital birth centre if I didn't do it grr You can absolutely have the glucose challenge test at 31 weeks if you wish to do so. The aim of having it at 26-28 weeks is because gestational diabetes will have typically developed by then. The test is just as effective at 31 weeks as it is between 26-28 weeks. It does have a significant false positive rate, although the vast majority (~75%) of women who 'fail' the screening test GCT pass the GTT (which is the diagnostic test). Antibodies- Continue reading >>

Supposed

Supposed "gestational Diabetes" Diagnosed At 6 Weeks And Wondering About My Current Treatment

Supposed "gestational diabetes" diagnosed at 6 weeks and wondering about my current treatment Hi everyone. I've lurked on here for several months, but this is my first post. I'm currently 32 weeks pregnant with my second child. I was diagnosed with what they're currently calling "gestational diabetes" when I was 6 weeks pregnant (and from what I've read, a GDM diagnosis before 20 weeks indicates the person probably had diabetes before pregnancy). Anyway, I'm 31 and was underweight and had hypothyroidism before this pregnancy, so I imagine I might have early LADA or MODY or something? I had two of the antibody tests and the c-peptide done in early pregnancy and they were normal, though. I guess I just want to vent and see if others with more experience think my sugars are being managed ok. My perinatologist has me only on 12 units of NPH once daily in the morning. At my last visit, he said he didn't want to give me any rapid-acting insulin to cover meals because my sugars "aren't bad enough." I feel like I can't eat anything! I eat about 15 carbs for breakfast and 30 each for lunch and dinner, plus 3 snacks of 15 carbs each. I'm still over goals (95 fasting and 120 at 2 hrs) half the time or more (the sugar goals in GDM are clearly lower than in regular DM). My fasting sugar is typically 100-105 and my 2 hr postprandials are 90-150. My baby has not been measuring large, so my doctor says he's not really too concerned about my elevated sugars (but I kind of am, since I do so much reading about the risks to babies of diabetic moms with poor sugar control). Should I push for a rapid-acting insulin? Should I just calm down? Thanks for any and all advice and just for listening. Sorry this is so long! go over to our Oh Baby group here on TuD. We will help support you through Continue reading >>

Another Gestational Diabetes Thread

Another Gestational Diabetes Thread

I'm 31 weeks pregnant and have just beem diagnosed with GD - 3 weeks after I did the test! I went to a group information session at the hospital on Thursday and they gave us all the little accu-check to test our blood - once before breakfast, two hours after brekky, two hours after lunch and again at two hours after dinner. They also gave us some guidelines which says it should be less than 5.5 before breakfast, and less than 7.0 two ours after meals. My tests before breakfast have been around 4.6, but my levels after meals have been ranging from 4.7 - 5.0. Is this ok? I'm a little confused about what levels they diagnose GD at and what is considered to be low and high glucose levels? I don't know what my levels were from the tolerance test I did. The woman on the phone just said they were "a bit high", and I don't see the doctor until Tuesday. With my first pregnancy they said it cam back a bit high and got me to do it again, which the second test came back fine. This time they didn't do that. They just diagnosed me. your sugar levels are ok. You must be managing your diet well! It is possible that your blood results from the GTT were borderline, meaning that you only just made it into the diabetes category. For example, last time mine were 5.5 after fasting O/N and 7.0 after the 2 hr GTT (going from memory....it was over a year ago now). Although they were high enough to make me diabetic but not high enough for insulin (which was great!). My bloods rarely made it over their 'high' marks, which was pleasing as it meant less hassle for me and it meant less sugar for bubs (lighter baby and less risk to him). Please note that the cut off levels for me have changed over the past year! Do not worry that you do not make it over their limit or that your sugars are around the Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Diagnosed With Gd At 31 Weeks

Diagnosed With Gd At 31 Weeks

I was just informed this week that I have gestational diabetes. I meet with a dietician and have an ultrasound on Wednesday. Ive been a wreck since finding out- not knowing what I can and cannot eat has been really stressful for me as Im trying to eat right. However, I dont really know what right is. Im hoping I can control my gd with the right diet so that I dont need insulin, especially since Im in the last stretch of my pregnancy. Do any of you have ideas of foods I can eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner until my appointment on weds? Stick to 2 carb servings in the morning (no juice or fruit in morning), 3 carb servings at lunch & dinner. Do 3 snacks between meals 1-2 carbs. A carb serving =15 g so read your labels. Include a protein & fat at each meal & try to include protein with snacks too. Dont cut down too much...your baby still needs to grow. Try to walk around a bit after meals to help control your blood sugar. Make sure to have your night time snack. Im a Registered Dietitian and I used to counsel women on this but its been a good 10 years since I did that because I went into management. At your appointment you will get a lot of detailed info and the latest info. Stress raises blood sugar so try to relax. You will find most foods work- its all about the portion size. If you are ever unsure just know you can always have meat and veggies. Eggs and cheese are good. Stick to high protein snacks without added sugar. Also, if you are craving a sweet snack green apples are low glycemic. I like to eat them with almond or peanut butter to add a little protein and fat for baby, plus it is delicious! Also, I like plain yogurt and add cinnamon, chia seeds, green apple, a little vanilla, and sometimes a little bit of a really low sugar and gluten free granola for a sna Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes 30 Weeks

Just Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes 30 Weeks

Just diagnosed with gestational diabetes 30 weeks Just diagnosed with gestational diabetes 30 weeks Im concerned if this has had any negative affects on the baby, and how do i know i wasn't diabetic before the test?. Ive never been tested before, and I keep reading that diabetes early on in a pregnancy can cause birth defects, and im stressed out.. Please Help. D.D. Family T1 since May 2006 Metformin, Humalog and Lantus Hi and welcome to DD.I don't know a lot about gestational diabetes,but I know it is quite common.I'm sure it's good they have picked it up and will keep a close eye on you.I'm sure someone with more knowledge will be along to reply soon.Take care and try not to get too stressed as that will raise your sugar levels and won't be good for baby. Friend T1 with Ulcerative Colitis, 10u of Lantus Don't panic! My doctor failed to diagnose me. I went my whole pregnancy with astronomical blood sugar levels. Although I was forced to deliver my son 6.5 weeks early, he was absolutely fine. He was big, but he was fine! There is no way to know if you were diabetic before. The best test will be after you deliver. If it goes away then you weren't, if it doesn't then you were. Good luck, and try not to worry. My son is living proof that children can be born to diabetic mothers, even if they were diagnosed late in pregnancy, or in my case not diagnosed or treated! Im concerned if this has had any negative affects on the baby, and how do i know i wasn't diabetic before the test?. Ive never been tested before, and I keep reading that diabetes early on in a pregnancy can cause birth defects, and im stressed out.. Please Help. I had that with my son and he was not born with any birth defects, he was a healthy 6lb. baby so don't stress. Your doctor should have you take the sug Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes At 30 Weeks Pregnant

Gestational Diabetes At 30 Weeks Pregnant

Gestational Diabetes at 30 Weeks Pregnant Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that only occurs during pregnancy, as the name implies. It’s often diagnosed late in pregnancy, typically after 24th week pregnant. The good news, most pregnant women with the condition can successfully deliver healthy babies. If you’re diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 30 weeks pregnant, here are pieces of helpful information to remember. Third trimester starts from week 28 of pregnancy and lasts to giving birth (typically around 40th week of pregnancy). At 30 weeks pregnant, your baby continues to be more active and therefore you can feel lots of your baby movements each day. You may be aware of many movements. There is no set number of these movements since it can vary from woman to woman, every pregnancy is unique. Just make sure you know the pattern of your baby movements! If this pattern changes, tell your doctor! This week is also the time of when the receptors of your baby will be completely developed. The baby’s brain is also getting bigger. Another significant change, the bone marrow of your baby usually has taken over production of red blood cells. This is very important step since it means the baby is better able to thrive on her /his own once born. And at 31 weeks pregnant, the baby will start to get signals from all five senses, more sensitive to what you eat, listen to the sound of your voice, perceive dark and light. As the baby continuously grows and develops at 30th week of pregnancy, you may also experience some discomforts associated with these changes, these include: Feeling of breathless. This discomfort can occur due to you have extra pounds of weight to carry around and your bump put more pressure to your lungs. At 29-32 weeks of pregnancy, night leg Continue reading >>

32 Weeks And Suddenly Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes-advice?8

32 Weeks And Suddenly Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes-advice?8

I've just been told I possibly have GD and have to go to hospital for further tests. I've tried to eat healthily but yes the old treat of cake or biscuit has made up for the other adult 'treats' I've had to give up while pregnant. However, I've not had any sugar in a long time and my urine tests indicated a really high level this morning so bit concerned about how long I may have been affected. So thinking radical overhaul of diet as I've also been confirmed as anaemic (everything at once, when I'm already all hormonal and weepy!) so any advice out there would be great - better diet and more exercise, is that the best way forward? I want to do all I can in these last months to ensure the best start for DD and I thought just getting through the last month of work would be my toughest challenge...not feeling great just now, very low but think that might be the anaemia and diabetes now!! Just wanted to say that I had almost an identical experience today and I'm 29 weeks. Last appointment glucose was slightly raised, so i really focused on healthy earting, cutting out sugars etc. Today the glucose was really quite high. I had a blood test and likely to have to go to hospital next week for full glucose test. They also suspect anemia, but I am surprised by this as my blood pressure was towards the higher end. Like you I feel really glum about it and I keep thinking I have done something wrong and causing harm to my baby. I have put on a couple of stone this pregnancy but on the whole thought I was eatinga balanced diet, though know I have had bigger portions than before, however over the last few weeks I have been really careful, so disappointed today. I am looking for really detailed diet advice on the web at moment so if I find anything good I'll post it here. I had gd fir Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Premature Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Premature Birth

It happens because your body cannot produce enough insulin (a hormone important in controlling blood glucose) to meet its extra needs in pregnancy and/or because your body is more resistant than usual to insulin. The result is that blood sugar levels go up. It usually occurs in the second half of pregnancy but can arise earlier. Any woman can develop gestational diabetes though some women are at more risk than others (see below). Diabetes affects around three to five in every 100 pregnant women (3-5%). Most women who develop diabetes in pregnancy have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies but occasionally gestational diabetes can cause serious problems, especially if it goes unrecognised. It is associated with stillbirth and premature labour and needs careful monitoring to reduce these risks. Gestational diabetes starts during pregnancy and stops after the baby is born. What are the risks of gestational diabetes? Any form of diabetes - including diabetes that developed before the pregnancy - must be managed carefully because it is associated with complications such as: premature birth giving birth to a large baby having problems during the birth such as shoulder dystocia (where the shoulder gets stuck after delivery of the head) developing pre-eclampsia developing polyhydramnios – too much fluid around the baby the death of the baby around the time of the birth your baby developing problems with low blood sugar after birth needing an emergency caesarean section or having labour induced Your baby may also be at risk of becoming obese and/or developing diabetes later in life. Controlling your levels of blood glucose during pregnancy and labour reduces the risks of all these complications for you and your baby (see below). Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? You are a Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

The latest guidance from NICE, published in 2015, has extended the time by which women with gestational diabetes should give birth to 40 weeks, 6 days – not much less than the general guidance for all pregnant women, which is 42 weeks. If you have not gone to birth at this point, induction of labour will be recommended. "When I was in the hospital, I felt I didn’t know what was going on. I would have liked more information about that part so I could have been better prepared." Gemma, mum of one The main reason for induction is to prevent stillbirth. For all women, the risk increases when their pregnancy goes past 42 weeks. However, one study has shown that women with gestational diabetes may be at risk earlier. So for this reason, the guidance in England and Wales states that if you have gestational diabetes, you should not go beyond 40 weeks, 6 days. An induction or caesarean may also be advised if your baby is very large (macrosomia) – as this may cause difficulties during the birth. On the other hand induction may also be recommended if the team detects poor growth in your baby. In Scotland, most women with diabetes in pregnancy are induced within 40 weeks. The guidance says that this decision should be determined on an individual basis. If you are taking diabetes medication or insulin, it recommends that you should be assessed at 38 weeks and delivered by 40 weeks. Choices you might need to make for labour and birth Most women with gestational diabetes have a healthy birth. But before you make your birth plan, you may need to take some things into account to make sure you and your baby are safe during and after the birth. If you have gestational diabetes, you will have less choice about where to deliver your baby. This is because you will need to deliver your Continue reading >>

I Am 31 Weeks, And Have Gestational Diabetes...

I Am 31 Weeks, And Have Gestational Diabetes...

I delivered my son at 39 weeks by emergency c-section. I had gestational diabetes. My doctor told me that my baby was going to be at least a 9lb. or 10lb. baby. When he was born, he weighed 7lbs. 7.6 oz. Talk about a prediction? Doctors do not know everything, they can only speculate, just like us. My advice during pregnancy, THE BEST ADVICE I RECEIVED WAS... forget that you are eating for two, make healthy choices, splurge in moderation, exercise when possible. It did help me control my diabetes. I had gestational diabetes with my son and it also runs in my family to have huge babies. My doctor made me go full term plus a week. She etimated my son to weigh about 8lbs. He weighed 9lbs 12oz and I had him vaginally. I can't help but think maybe if she had induced me a little early it would've save me a few stitches and him a broken collar bone. Trust your instincts. My son felt huge and my doctor wouldn't listen to me. Also did your mother or grandmother have large babies? (my sister weighed 11 lbs 3 oz) Really the best thing you can do for yourself is to control your diet. Which will be extremely hard because diabetes gives you an insatiable hunger. Watch starch nd sugar the last month especially because sugar promotes cellular growth and thats all the baby does the last month. Your doc may want you to have another ultrasound closer to the end to estimate how big the baby is. Hang in there. I'm right there with you at 31 wks with #2 hoping he ends up smaller than his big bro. Please keep in mind that the weight of your baby right now is only an estimate and babies can weigh less or more than what they are estimated to weigh even with the help of an ultrasound. My third child was estimated to be 8 lbs just days before he was born. He was 10lbs and 6 oz, born at 41 weeks a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect This mom found out late in her pregnancy that she had gestational diabetes and was shocked and in denial over her diagnosis, until she found the silver lining. I'd never failed a test in my whole life, and the very thought used to give me nightmares at school. That all changed when I was pregnant with my first baby. I failed the one-hour sugar test that screens expectant moms for gestational diabetes . And though I passed the subsequent three-hour version, I failed both of them again later in my pregnancy by just a number or two. It was confirmed, according to my doctor: I had GD. To say I was stunned and terribly upset would be an understatement. I'd been lucky enough to get pregnant over the age of 35 with no trouble at all, and things had been going so smoothly until then. I wasn't overweight and didn't have a history of diabetes in my family. I was exercising regularly, eating healthily, and had tons of energy. My only risk factor for gestational diabetes was my age, and I had no symptoms. So how could this be happening to me? I listened numbly over the phone as my OB delivered the bad news and informed me of what I had to do. I honestly couldn't believe it. The results had to be wrong. Maybe they got my sample mixed up with someone else's in the lab? Or maybe my doctor was being overzealous because of how old I was. Plus, I'd passed the three-hour screening earlier on. Wasn't that enough? I told her how upset I was and expressed my doubts about the accuracy of the diagnosis. She listened, but firmly stuck to her read of my condition. Eventually, I realized I had no choice but to accept it and do everything I was told to do. I had to pri Continue reading >>

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

i dont have diabetes, but i think with it babies grow bigger earlier so they usually try and induce you early to make sure baby's not too big and to decrease the chances of any problems with the mums help. i dont know if that will help maybe you should ring your doctor and get them to answer some of your questions. Good luck with everything and i hope that you deliver a healthy baby Hi, i had gestational diabetes when i was pregnant and I too was worried and scared what it meant. However all was well. You just need to control it and it will be fine. At first i controlled mine with diet but later in the pregnancy i needed to have insulin. If that happens to you dont worry about it. Its nothing you have done. I felt like i needed to blame myself... my diet etc, but its not that. I cant explain it all, but its not your fault. Because i was on insulin i had an ultrasound to determine how big my baby was. The Doctor just wanted to check up on the baby. My son wasnt overly huge but the Dr still induced me about 4 days early. ( i still think it was because he was due on Good Friday and the Dr didnt want to work on Good Friday! LOL) All went well with the birth. My son weighed 3.97kg which is not THAT big really. He did have low blood sugar though when he came out and needed to eat pretty much straight away. I think its because i had fasted and my blood sugar was low as well. The main thing is just to watch what you eat, make sure you see a specialist and nutritionist asap and not stress. Stress can raise your blood levels also! PS by the way, if you do need to go on insulin.. dont worry about the injections. They actually hurt less than pricking your finger!!! I to had GD with both my boys. When I found out the first time I was feeling like you stressed scared out of my mind Continue reading >>

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