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Gestational Diabetes Chicken Salad

What Happened When I Started Eating Salad For Breakfast

What Happened When I Started Eating Salad For Breakfast

What Happened When I Started Eating Salad for Breakfast I need to preface a few things before I let you in on the GREAT results I found after I started eating salad for breakfast. For almost eight months now, I have attempted to eat very little refined sugar and very few refined carbs? See, over a year ago, my father had some terribly painful digestive problems that doctors could not diagnose. He was in excruciating pain, and there seemed to be nothing he could do about it. Finally, his oncologist sent him to a holistic doctor. This was the best thing that ever happened to my dad. His new holistic doctor immediately recommended that he switch to a paleo diet. This was a HUGE change for both my parents. My mom was spending hours in the kitchen making EVERYTHING from scratch. What happened next was crazy. My parents started losing weight at a rapid pace AND after two weeks, my father's pain was gone. After months of recommendations and a very painful biopsy, two weeks of a wholesome and healthy diet healed my father. Pregnancy and a Gestational Diabetes test I was pregnant with my second son when all this happened with my dad. I went in for my routine one hour gestational diabetes test. What happened? I failed it! (by only three points, but alas, I failed it.) I IMMEDIATELY changed my diet. I didn't go hard core paleo, but I cut out all refined sugar and refined carbs. I was 22 weeks pregnant and losing weight. Kind of crazy. Please know I was still eating PLENTY of food. I went in my doctor's to retake my gestational diabetes test and I passed with exceptionally flying colors after three weeks of new eating habits. So where am I now? I'm stuck. I'm nursing, and I can't get the baby weight off as fast as I would like. With the help of my husband, I have cut out all refin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Menu!!

Gestational Diabetes Menu!!

I've only been dealing with this for about 2 weeks now, and already I am getting bored with what I'm eating. If you have GD, can you please write down what you eat on a typical day(or something you really like? I hope if we get enough replies, we'll have lots of new ideas to help us get through this! I figure we can just write down the foods and we will each need to adjust according to our own personal portions/goals etc. - 1/3 cup of oatmeal, mixed with 3 tbsp. of unsweetened apple sauce and some cinnamon. - Spinach salad with chopped tomatoes, green pepper, cucumber, carrots and topped with some shredded cheese. - 1 small whole wheat tortilla filled with some spinach, tomato, shredded cheese and grilled chicken pieces. - Some Activia yogourt. (can't remember the serving size) - Open-faced pulled pork sandwich (pulled pork was plain, I added some low cal/carb BBQ sauce and mixed it in. The bread was whole wheat, thinly sliced bread. - 2 pieces of the whole wheat, thinly sliced bread, toasted and topped with some peanut butter. I'm not going to go through my "typical day of eating" but I will share some of my favorite foods that make an appearance on my menu. Some go to foods that I really love are almond butter, cashew butter, almond milk, turkey bacon, eggs, grilled fish, and I love to make quesadillas at home! I use whole wheat tortillas and quesadilla cheese, cooked chicken or beef, add in some onion and veggies and pan fry with olive oil until cheese is melted. It is heaven. Also one thing I love to eat: Lean ground beef browned in the skillet. Mix in cheese, veggies of your choice. Wrap in lettuce leaves like a burrito and enjoy! Super good! Take advantage of your free foods too so you won't feel hungry all of the time. I love sugar free jello, and my dietician s Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

You are here: Home / Gestational Diabetes / Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas We are finally getting down to the end of my pregnancy which also means the end of gestational diabetes! Hurrah! Unlike most women who are diagnosed around their third trimester I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 11 weeks (due to a high family history of diabetes), so what Im saying is, Ive had a lot of practice at the gestational diabetes diet. One really positive thing about having gestational diabetes is it basically forces you to have a healthy pregnancy. So far I am 37 weeks and have gained not quite 10 pounds. (ie my body is losing weight while the baby is gaining weight) Im also having a much more active pregnancy, even though I dont do a lot of traditional workouts I walk 1-2 miles a day and I think in general chasing after a preschooler AND toddler has kept me moving. Please note: My carb and calorie counts were given to me by a dietician based on my glucose numbers. They are completely individual and for example only. Do NOT self-diagnose or undertake any dietary changes while pregnant without first consulting your doctor. Oatmeal with 1/2 cup berries and 1/2 scoop of protein powder 0 Fat Greek yogurt with 1/2 cup berries and 1/4 cup multigrain Cheerios 2 pieces Ezekiel toast with peanut butter Peanut Butter Chocolate shake: 1/2 banana, scoop of chocolate protein powder, 8 oz almond milk, 1 Teaspoon peanut butter, 6 pieces ice. Strawberrysmoothie: 1 cup strawberries or mixed berries, 1/2 cup Greek yogurt, 8 ounces almond milk, scoop of vanilla protein powder, 1 cup spinach (optional), ice as needed. Lean ground turkey sausage has been a lifesaver as well. 0 carbs and really filling! I pretty much add a patty or two to any breakfast for extra protein. I do go through phases w Continue reading >>

Chicken Salad With Walnuts

Chicken Salad With Walnuts

Ingredients Directions Poach the chicken breasts in simmering broth until cooked through, about 15 minutes. Drain, cool, and cut (or shred) into bite-sized pieces. In a small bowl, combine the sour cream, mayonnaise, and vinegar. Combine the chicken and dressing. (Can be made ahead and refrigerated to this point one day in advance.) Before serving, add the celery, walnuts, tarragon, salt, and pepper to taste. Nutrition Information Per 1/2-cup serving: 271 calories (19% calories from fat), 46 g protein, 6 g total fat (0.9 g saturated fat), 7 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 111 mg cholesterol, 253 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 6 very lean protein, 1/2 carbohydrate (bread/starch) Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Sample Diets For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diets For Gestational Diabetes

Quick and Easy Lunches for Gestational Diabetes By the time lunch hits for many women with gestational diabetes, you might be ready to consume anything in sight. I have to make sure to eat a mid-morning snack to keep my energy up and blood sugar from going too low, which can result in craving sugar and carbs. If I don't have a snack, come lunchtime I'm ready to devour everything in sight! There are many healthy options for quick and easy lunch menus for women with gestational diabetes without succumbing to the lures of the carb laden value meals at the fast food drive through. The key is having staples on hand to pack for work or grab quickly at home when you are hungry for an easy lunch. Staples for quick, easy, and healthful lunches include: 1. Single servings if whole grains, such as whole grain breads, wild and brown rice, whole grain or wheat crackers, low carb wheat tortillas, and whole grain pastas. To make pasta and rice lunch-friendly, cook a moderate amount and then freeze in 1/3 cup (1 carb option) or 2/3 cup (2 carb choices) serving sizes to reheat. (Whole grains are lower on the glycemic index, so they will give you and your baby good nutrition without making your blood sugar rise quickly). 2. Quick protein sources such as cooked chicken, turkey, or lean beef, low-fat cheese, low fat cottage cheese, eggs, peanut butter and nuts, and quick meats like turkey hot dogs or deli lunch meats. Pre-cooked turkey bacon or sausage can also be crumbled and added to salads, wraps, and other dishes. (Caution: Remember to cook hot dogs and lunch meats until steaming to avoid the risk of listeria, a potentially harmful bacteria). 3. Fresh veggies: pre-cut salads, pre-washed spinach, and bagged ready-to-eat veggies can be convenient for lunches. To save money, wash and cut Continue reading >>

Just Found Out I Have Gestational Diabetes. - Circle Of Moms

Just Found Out I Have Gestational Diabetes. - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > Welcome to Circle of Moms!! > Just found out I have gestational diabetes. Just found out I have gestational diabetes. [deleted account] ( 4 moms have responded ) I just found out last week that I have gestational diabetes. In the middle of the day my blood glucose is fine; but in the morning and at night it is high. It seems like there is hardly anyhting I can eat. Any suggestions. I also had gestational diabetes. Has your OB referred you to a dietician? I saw a dietician within a few days of being diagnosed. She laid out a diet plan for me. However, my GD was so severe that I often found that foods allowed on the GD diet did not agree with my blood sugars, so I just avoided those. Also, even though I strictly adhered to the diet, I still had to be on medication. So, don't get frustrated if this happens to you. I had to eat small meals every 2 to 3 hours with only 2 to 3 servings (15 grams carbs/serving) of carbs each meal. I also found that my glucose levels were high in the morning due to cortisol levels. I ended up just eating protein for breakfast (ex. bacon and eggs). I then saved my allotted carbs for the rest of the day. I found that walking after eating really helped to keep my glucose levels down. Read labels for carb content. I had to adhere to 2 to 3 servings of carbs per a meal. And, 15 grams of carbs equals a serving. Don't pay attention to sugar amts because this is included in the carb amt. Some of the things that I ate for my meals were... Condiments very low in carbs or carb free are mayonnaise, sour creme, ranch dressing, ketchup, mustard, pickles, and cheese. So these were like free items to me. I found that I couldn't eat most grain/bread products, including oatmeal So I just mainly avoided these to avoid having to be on insulin. L Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes A health-care professional for more than 10 years, Rica Lewis has obtained numerous certifications in the industry. In 2006 she began channeling her knowledge into health-related articles for print and online publications. Her work has appeared in "Metroparent Magazine," "Anew Heart Healthcare Magazine" and community newspapers. Lewis earned a diploma from LongRidge Writers Institute. Special meal planning for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women whose blood sugar levels are elevated during pregnancy. Women who do not have diabetes outside of pregnancy can get gestational diabetes. Expecting mothers are typically tested as a routine part of medical care. The disease is thought to be caused by the placentas hormones blocking the action of the mothers insulin, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The goal of treatment is to keep blood glucose levels normal. Special meal planning in addition to blood glucose monitoring and insulin injections are all aspects of treatment. When planning meals, the ADA recommends women with gestational diabetes limit fat intake to 30 percent or less of daily calories. A healthy breakfast for women with gestational diabetes might begin with whole grain toast with sugar-free jelly, a teaspoon of butter or margarine, one egg and a side of fresh fruit. Lunch could include a leafy green salad with a variety of vegetables, topped with a vinegar and oil dressing or a light variety with low sugar. Lean meats like turkey or chicken are also great salad toppers and can provide a substantial source of protein. Soups can also be great lunch meals and can incorporate a host of vegetables. Packaged foods should be limited, as they are often higher in calories, carboh Continue reading >>

Peach Chicken Salad | Gestational Diabetes Recipes

Peach Chicken Salad | Gestational Diabetes Recipes

Lisa said: Hi Hazeline. Good on your for making an impact with your BGLs... Read More Lisa said: Hi Jessica thanks for sharing your experience... Read More Lisa said: Hi Kandice. This is a store-bought bar and is an Australian example of a packaged snack that works within the GDM diet recommendations... Read More Lisa said: So glad you found us! And best wishes with your pregnancy... Read More Jess Thomson said: Hi there , thank you for the great information i have just been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and i wont be seeing my specialist till nxt week and im freaking out... Read More (1 carbohydrate serve = 15 grams of total carbohydrate) This is a refreshing summer salad that is literally sensational in that it ticks off crunchy, creamy, sweet and salty. And I think that combination of sweet and savoury will really appeal to the gestational diabetes palette. Although you may have never considered combining peach and chicken, once you try it youll never look back. (Main carbohydrate containing ingredients are listed in bold.) 4 single chicken breast fillets,approximately 800g/ 1 pounds in total) 400g/ 13 ounces small new potatoes, quartered 150g/ 5 ounces low fat plain or greek yoghurt 600g/ 1.3pounds ripe peaches or nectarines, hulled, quartered 1 large telegraph cucumber or 3 small cucumbers, peeled, halved lengthways, chopped 1/3 cup of finely chopped fresh mint leaves 200g/ 7 ounces baby spinach or salad leaves Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Cook potatoes for 10 minutes or until just cooked. Drain and set aside. Lightly grease a large non-stick frying pan with olive oil spray. Heat over medium-high heat. Season both sides of chicken breasts with salt and pepper. Add to the pan and cook for 5 -10 minutes each side or until cooked through. Turn Continue reading >>

Unhealthy Food Choices For People With Diabetes

Unhealthy Food Choices For People With Diabetes

While it'stechnicallytrue that"all foods can fit" in a healthy diabetesdiet , there are some foods that are just easier (and healthier) to avoid. This mostly comes down to portion control. A dish with a concentrated amount of sugar or fat might work in your diet if you're having just a bite or two. But especially if you're eating out, what's the point of tempting yourself with a big portion of something that only "fits" in small amounts? Here are five foods to avoid when you're eating out or buying prepared foods: I'm a big fan of sandwiches, especially for people with diabetes. Lean proteins and vegetables on slices of whole grain bread make for a quick and balanced diabetes-friendly meal. But be careful about tuna, chicken and egg salad sandwiches, especially if you're eating out. Most commercially prepared salad sandwich fillers use plenty of full-fat mayonnaise. This pushes the calorie and fat levels sky-high. If you're cooking at home, use just enough reduced-fat or fat-free mayonnaise to hold everything together. If you're eating out, it's probably better to skip the salad sandwiches. You can put the words "taco" and "salad" in the same sentence, but it doesn't make it healthy. Healthy salad meals start with about a two-cup base of leafy greens (the darker the green the better) and are topped with lean proteins, non-starchy vegetables, possibly legumes and a light dressing. Southwestern salads, on the other hand, are often calorie bombs thanks to full-fat cheese, fried meats, heavy dressings and fried salad toppers. There are healthy ones out there, but this category of "salads" should be a red-flag. Smoothies may sound synonymous with health food, but most times they're not. Many retail establishments use smoothie mixes that contain too much added sugar, especia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Tetra Images/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images The food cravings and aversions of pregnancy often make meal planning and eating a bit more complicated, and gestational diabetes only adds to this complexity. When it comes to meal ideas and recipes, a woman with gestational diabetes needs tobe most mindful of carbohydrates, which is the nutrient that impacts blood sugars the most. Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Diabetes means that glucose (sugar) levels in a person's bloodstream are too high. Normally, the hormone insulin , which is produced by an organ called the pancreas, absorbs and uses glucose that comes from your food. During pregnancy, though, a woman's hormones make it difficult for her to use insulin (this is called insulin resistance). In other words, she has to use a lot more insulin, up to three times as much, to bring down glucose levels in the blood. In some pregnant women (around 9 percent, according to the American Diabetes Association) their body cannot make enough insulin to keep their glucose levels within the normal rangethis condition is called gestational diabetes. In order to control blood sugar, women with gestational diabetes need to follow a carbohydrate-controlled diet. Sometimes, if a diet is not enough to control blood glucose levels, a woman may need to also take insulin or an oral medication like metformin . When planning your meals (under the guidance of your healthcare team), there are a couple tidbits to keep in mind. One is that your sensitivity and reactivity to carbohydrates may increase as your pregnancy progresses. Also, pregnancy with diabetes can make big demands on time which can influence your ability to preparehome-made meals. Thi Continue reading >>

Baby Shower For A Very Cute Diabetic Mommy

Baby Shower For A Very Cute Diabetic Mommy

Sharing joy through food, community and travel. Baby Shower for a Very Cute Diabetic Mommy As I mentioned in a previous post , I volunteered to host a baby shower last week for one of my co-workers. She is also a sweet friend, so I was excited for the opportunity. It was only the second baby shower Ive planned (the other was almost 3 years ago before I had this blog). This shower was more of a challenge, though, as the mom has gestational diabetes . This means, her diet is very limitedto basically meats, cheese, veggies and no (or very few) carbs. The challenge was a welcoming one for me, however. There was no way I was going to make a bunch of food she couldnt eat. I did a web search and thought a bunch of recipes would pop up. Boy, was I wrong! There really isnt much out there on diabetic food for baby showers! I did come across a few message boards where many diabetic victims complained about their baby shower hosts not even planning a menu around their diets, and serving a bunch of delicious looking sweets they couldnt even touch! How awful! Determined, I did a little more digging and finally came up with a few ideas. Im hoping by posting these recipes in the next few days that others who are struggling with the same road-bump may find my site helpful. Later, the mom told me she was excited she was able to take at least one of everything of the food. She even said she had seconds of the chicken salad! Stay tuned for the recipes, but for now, here is a list of the menu: Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

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