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Gestational Diabetes And Heat

Ambient Temperature Affects Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

Ambient Temperature Affects Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

Ambient temperature affects risk of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a transient type of diabetes that develops mid-pregnancy. Research out of Canada suggests that the weather - or, more specifically, ambient temperature - affects your risk of developing the condition. The hotter it is, the greater the likelihood. Endocrinologist, Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St. Michaels Hospital, Toronto Norman Swan: Hello, and welcome to this week's Health Report with me, Norman Swan. Today, how psychological biases in your doctor can be a barrier to offering you the best care. Plus some solutions where you can play a role. Knowing when to worry and went to worry less when you're thinking and memory might be off the pace; new research findings. Important genetic findings in a devastating form of heart disease. And how one unexpected effect of climate change could be an increased prevalence of women who develop diabetes during pregnancy, gestational diabetes. A very large Canadian study has linked gestational diabetes to outdoor temperatures, with cold climate being best. The lead researcher was endocrinologist at the University of Toronto, Gillian Booth. Welcome to the Health Report. Norman Swan: So you'd better just tell us a bit more about this cold-induced thermogenesis and why you think it might be linked to gestational diabetes. Gillian Booth: Well, there are has actually been a growing body of research showing that cold, which we know can activate brown fat, that helps us acclimatise to cold and make energy and heat, that it actually can improve insulin sensitivity. So because of that we wanted to see if there was a relationship between air temperature and the likelihood of having a metabolic disease like diabetes, because we know that there is a lot of scien Continue reading >>

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Heat

Gestational Diabetes And Heat

Staying safe in hot weather - Gestational diabetes and heat Summer has arrived and so what does that mean for you lovely ladies as far as staying safe in the hot weather, plus gestational diabetes and heat is concerned? Here's a few points to note which may make your gestational diabetes summer a bit more pleasant and levels a bit lower and stabilised. DRINK, DRINK, DRINK! Hydration is so important during pregnancy, with gestational diabetes we need to stay well hydrated and then add hot weather and humidity into the mix and guess what? Yes, you need to drink even more to stay well hydrated. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose from your urine, meaning higher blood sugar levels. You shouldn't be waiting until you are thirsty to drink, you should be drinking to ensure that you do not become thirsty! As always, water is your best option, but sugar free drinks are fine too. See our drinks page for more information on drinks. HYPOS There is a risk of more hypos in hot weather for those taking insulin or Glibenclamide.Heat can increase the absorption of some fast-acting insulin, meaning you may need to test your blood glucose more often and perhaps adjust your dose of insulin. Please note: you should consult a medical professional before adjusting your dose of insulin, unless you have already been guidance. The body’s metabolism is higher in hot and humid weather as it is working much harder and so if you are taking insulin or Glibenclamide to help control your blood glucose levels then be prepared in case you have a hypo. Know the symptoms and have a hypo kit to hand. To learn about hypos, please take a Continue reading >>

Hot Weather Might Raise Your Gestational Diabetes Risk

Hot Weather Might Raise Your Gestational Diabetes Risk

Hot Weather Might Raise Your Gestational Diabetes Risk Gestational diabetes , the term used to describe diabetes that develops during pregnancy, has a host of risk factors. Now it appears that hot weather is also a hazard, according to a study published in the May 2017 Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ). Gestational diabetes affects more than 9 percent of women, according to a 2014 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The condition can be dangerous for both mother and baby, which is why experts recommend pregnant women undergo screening between weeks 24 and 28 . The placenta, which carries nutrients to the growing fetus, secretes hormones that help the baby develop, but that also block the action of insulin on the mothers body. The result can be hyperglycemia (high blood sugar); when it persists it is categorized as gestational diabetes. Risk factors include: Family history of diabetes or gestational diabetes Ethnicity (higher prevalence among African-American and Hispanic women, and women from South Asia and Southeast Asia) According to the Canadian researchers, exposure to hot weather is also a risk factor. They found that the higher the outdoor temperature, the more significant the risk of developing gestational diabetes. In the study, researchers gathered data from women who gave birth in the greater Toronto area between 2002 to 2014. (Excluded from the study were women who gave birth prematurely, and women who had type 1 or type 2 diabetes prior to pregnancy.) By tracking over 550,000 births and looking at weather data obtained from Environment and Climate Change Canada, the researchers found a correlation between rates of gestational diabetes and temperatures charted for 30 days prior to diagnosis. Overall, the rate of gestational d Continue reading >>

Hot Weather May Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Pregnant Women

Hot Weather May Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Pregnant Women

Hot weather may increase risk of diabetes in pregnant women A study found that women in warmer climates had 7.7% higher risk of developing gestational diabetes as compared to a 4.6% risk of those staying in colder climates. When pregnant women expose themselves to temperatures averaging 24 degrees Celsius or above, they run the risk of developing gestational diabetes, say researchers.(Shutterstock) Pregnant women should not expose themselves to temperatures averaging 24 degrees Celsius or above, as they would run the risk of developing gestational diabetes, say researchers. In comparison, women who remained in colder climates with temperatures averaging minus 10 degrees or colder, stood less chances of developing the disease, a study found. The results of the study that tried to find out outdoor temperature exposure on pregnant women showed women in warmer climates had 7.7% higher risk of developing gestational diabetes as compared to a 4.6% risk of those staying in colder climates. Further, for every 10 degrees Celsius increase in temperature, there was a 6 to 9% relative increase in the risk, showed the finding which is based on the theory of how brown fat in humans becomes active in cold climate to generate heat and metabolism throughout our bodies. Researchers found that cold exposure can improve your sensitivity to insulin, by turning on a protective type of fat called brown adipose tissue. (Shutterstock) Many would think that in warmer temperatures, women are outside and more active, which would help limit the weight gain in pregnancy that predisposes a woman to gestational diabetes, said lead author Gillian Booth, a researcher at St Michael Hospital in Ontario, Canada. However, cold exposure can improve your sensitivity to insulin, by turning on a protective typ Continue reading >>

Any On With Gestational Diabetes Getting Lovely Low Readings In This Heat?

Any On With Gestational Diabetes Getting Lovely Low Readings In This Heat?

I am 31 weeks and have had gd since 16 weeks, I am on 2 metformin a day and keep being threatened with insulin, sugars have always been all over especially after breakfast. However since the heateabe began I haven't had a reading over 6 anyone else? I am thinking do I dare eat a cornetto Hi, I've got GD diagnosed at 16 weeks as well, taking metformin and insulin at night too. Interestingly I've been getting higher readings since the heatwave started! I never actually thought it might be related... Mmm not sure about the cornetto though, may not wanna risk it especially if they are getting under control now! However if you walk or exercise for at least good half hour afterwards you might just get away with it! Works for me almost always. Good luck! Oddly mine are higher in the heat, and I'm drinking so much water I was hoping I'd be washing the sugars away! On the ice cream front, there's a fantastic group on Facebook for GD mums and the group founder has researched all ice creams to see which have least carbs... mini milks are the best apparently! If you want to have a look search for Gestational Diabetes UK Mums in Facebook groups. It has helped me loads! I've had my lowest readings yet this morning despite eating and excising as normal. I hadn't thought it could be the heat. Mine are edging up slightly, but I think the diabetes is gradually getting worse, as it did last time. I'm desperate for ice cream. No high readings at all in the first six weeks, so I suppose I could treat myself, but for me it'd be a slippery slope. Continue reading >>

Can Outdoor Temperatures Influence Gestational Diabetes?

Can Outdoor Temperatures Influence Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a birth complication affecting millions of women worldwide. New research examines the link between air temperature and the risk of developing this condition. Gestational diabetes (GD) is a temporary form of diabetes that affects some women during pregnancy. These future mothers often have no history of diabetes prior to getting pregnant, but their blood sugar increases by the time they are halfway through their pregnancy. In 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that in the United States, as many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women may be affected by GD. Worldwide, around 1 in 7 births are affected by this complication. GD occurs when the hormones in the placenta trigger insulin resistance, meaning that healthy blood sugar levels cannot be maintained. Sensitivity to insulin is known to be improved by exposure to cold temperatures, during which the body produces more heat to keep itself warm. However, could it be that outside air temperatures have a larger impact on the risk of developing GD? Researchers from St. Michael's Hospital, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Mount Sinai Hospital, and the University of Toronto - all in Ontario, in Canada - set out to explore the connection between outdoor air temperature and the risk of GD. The findings were published in CMAJ. Each 10°C temperature increase raises risk of GD by 6 to 9 percent The study examined 555,911 births from 396,828 women over a period of 12 years, from 2002 to 2014. The women were 31 years old on average, and lived in the Greater Toronto Area. Approximately half of the mothers were not born in Canada. Extremely cold outdoor temperatures were defined as an average of 10°C or less, and hot temperatures as 24°C on average. The women wer Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

'get Outside And Embrace The Cold:' Gestational Diabetes Linked To Warmer Temperatures

'get Outside And Embrace The Cold:' Gestational Diabetes Linked To Warmer Temperatures

Canadian researchers have uncovered a direct link between risk of gestational diabetes and what may at first seem like an unlikely source: outdoor air temperatures. In Monday's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, researchers report the relationship they found after checking records of nearly 400,000 pregnant women in the Greater Toronto Area who gave birth between 2002 and 2014. "This is the first population study showing this relationship between air temperature and gestational diabetes risk," said lead author Dr. Gillian Booth, a scientist at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Alicia Dubay's gestational diabetes illustrates the stakes for women at high risk of developing the condition. Left untreated, the temporary form of diabetes in pregnancy can result in stillbirth, increase the risk of having a difficult delivery and increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes for mom and baby. "I remember after I got my diagnosis, I called my husband crying really, really hard, because I was nervous and worried about it what it meant for me and for my baby," Dubay, 32, recalled. Women typically take a glucose drink test 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancy to see if their blood sugar levels are high. Dubay's baby girl, Seraphina Rose, was born healthy and full term at 37 weeks in December 2015. A short stay in the neonatal ICU to check that the infant was fine at regulating her blood sugars was the only effect related to the Brampton, Ont., mom's gestational diabetes. "There were a few things that were really challenging," Dubay said. "Just keeping on top of all the scheduling of everything that you need to do" to manage the condition while working full time. It included: Carefully planned and prepared meals and snacks. B Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes May Increase With Warmer Days, Study Finds

Gestational Diabetes May Increase With Warmer Days, Study Finds

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Gestational diabetes may increase with warmer days, study finds WATCH Index: Women With Gestational Diabetes More Likely to Have Child With Autism Diabetes during pregnancy has long frustrated doctors trying to discern why some women are more at risk for the disease than others. Though some factors have been associated with increased risk for the condition, including age, family history, excess weight and race, many questions remain. A new study published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal looked at 396,828 pregnant women and found another potential factor that could increase the risk for gestational diabetes : rising temperatures. "There is also growing evidence supporting a link between air temperature, metabolic function and energy expenditure," the authors wrote. Researchers at the Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, studied 555,911 births from women in the Toronto area between 2002 and 2014 to see if certain temperatures were associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes . They studied the average temperatures for 30 days before a pregnant woman's routine test for gestational diabetes, which occurs at 27 weeks. They found that the prevalence of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes was higher if there the weather was warmer shortly before they were diagnosed. When the average temperature was above 24 degrees Celsius, or about 75 degrees Fahrenheit, approximately 7.7 percent of women were diagnosed with gestational diabetes. When the average temperature was below -10 degrees Celsius, or about 14 degrees Fahrenheit, just 4.6 percent of pregnant women studied were diagnosed with the condition. "If the association b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes & Influential Weather

Gestational Diabetes & Influential Weather

There are over 200,000 cases in the US every year of pregnant women affected by gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when a woman acquires diabetes while pregnant. During pregnancy, women who have high blood sugar caused by placental hormones will have diabetes symptoms. These symptoms include excessive hunger and thirst and fatigue. Most common ages affected by this are women between the ages of 19 and 40. Baby Center reports that between 5-10% of all women that are pregnant get gestational diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) claims 9.2% are affected by high blood sugar. Your body’s resistance levels to insulin heighten when pregnant. The growing baby requires glucose to stay healthy and nourished. Healthy pregnant women that do not have gestational diabetes. They have pancreases that are able to secrete insulin into the blood to process extra glucose. Women that have gestational diabetes during pregnancy cannot keep up with the rise in glucose. When cells are unable to use the glucose, blood sugar levels remain too high. Research On Temperatures Affecting GD A recent research study was performed over the past 12 years, on 396,828 pregnant women that were on average 31 years old. Research was done to find correlations between outside air temperatures and the risk of developing gestational diabetes. New research shows that a woman’s pregnant body is more sensitive to insulin when exposed to cold temperatures. When the body needs to produce more heat to stay warm, there is an improvement of insulin sensitivity. Research in Ontario, Canada at hospitals including St. Michael’s, CES, and Mount Sinai Hospital. Studies showed, “Each 10°C temperature increase raises the risk of GD by 6 to 9 percent.” Continue reading >>

Pregnant In The Summer? You're At Greater Risk For Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant In The Summer? You're At Greater Risk For Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant in the summer? You're at greater risk for gestational diabetes When the temperature rises, so does your blood sugar, and that could lead to gestational diabetes when youre pregnant says a new study. Youve probably realized that being pregnant in the summer means youll be sweating extra profusely on those sweltering days and gazing enviously as others sip mojitos on the patio while you drinkwater in between frequent pee breaks. But did you know that being pregnant when its hot out also increases your risk for developing gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition that occurs during pregnancy in which your body cant produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar at a normal level. Though it typically doesnt show any noticeable symptoms, it cancause women to have bigger babies, leading to interventions like C-sections during delivery, and its associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. The news that gestational diabetes could be influenced by temperature came from a Toronto-based study that looked at more than 550,000 births from nearly 400,000 moms. Women are typically screened for diabetes 27 weeks into pregnancy. Researchers decided to compare the average temperature in the 30 days before that point to see if there was a relationship between the outdoor temperature and the diagnosis of gestational diabetes. The study, which was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found that 6.5 percent of women experienced gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but, among those who experienced temperatures -10 degrees Celsius or colder, only 4.6 percent had the condition. Meanwhile, among those who were sweating it out at 24 degrees Celsius or more, the rate of gestational diabetes rose to 7.7 percent. Researchers con Continue reading >>

Counterpoint: Glucose Monitoring In Gestational Diabetes

Counterpoint: Glucose Monitoring In Gestational Diabetes

Lots of heat, not much light It was once fashionable for theological scholars to debate the number of angels that could dance on the head of a pin. The debates were quite heated, narrowly focused, and unencumbered by facts. They made for great controversy but solved no real problems (lots of heat, no light). In many respects, ongoing debates about the nuances of glucose monitoring for patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are analogous to those past debates about dancing angels. The debates are heated, they are focused on very small nuances in the management of GDM that have minor if any impact on the outcomes of pregnancies complicated by GDM, and they are generally unencumbered by hard facts. While generating considerable heat, the debates shed very little real light on optimization of perinatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by GDM. In this counterpoint, we briefly summarize the major limitations of such a narrow focus on the nuances of glucose monitoring and control in the antepartum management of GDM. We will address the topic at two levels: 1) whether there really are optimal times to measure glucose levels in women with GDM, and 2) whether all patients really need to perform glucose self-monitoring. Among clinicians and investigators working in the field of GDM, the debate rages on whether pregnant patients should measure their glucose levels before or after meals and, if after, how long after eating. Ammunition in favor of one timing or another comes largely from analyses of correlations between maternal glucose levels and fetal outcomes, such as rates of macrosomic (>4,000 g at birth) or large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants. The results have been quite inconsistent. Fasting glucose was most strongly correlated with outcomes in some studies a Continue reading >>

How Stress Affects Blood Glucose Levels

How Stress Affects Blood Glucose Levels

Stress can increase your blood glucose levels. Stress can also cause you to turn to unhealthful behaviors such as overeating, eating unhealthful foods or smoking. Managing your stress and relaxing more will help you and your baby stay as healthy as possible. Identify sources of stress Being pregnant, preparing for a new baby and learning to manage gestational diabetes are stressful things on their own. But you also lead a life in the real world, with all it stresses and tensions. Stress has many sources. Name some of your main sources of stress and see if you can identify an action to reduce or eliminate complications of gestational diabetes for you and your baby. You might find that simply learning as much as you can about gestational diabetes will relieve much of your worry. How to reduce your stress level Find opportunities to rest: sit, lie down, put your feet up. Talk to friends, family and your partner about your concerns and stresses. Lower your expectations of yourself. The house can be messy, the laundry can fall behind and you can be less than perfect. You're helping your baby grow and be healthy, and that's your first priority. Get enough sleep. Ask for help in getting tasks done. Ask a friend to drive, a sister to help set up the nursery, your partner to grocery shop. If possible, hire out tasks like yard work and house cleaning during your pregnancy. Know and accept your limits. Let friends and family know that for now, you have to take special care of yourself and your baby. When you need rest. excuse yourself and go rest. When you feel overwhelmed, take on less. Be physically active every day. It's a great stress reliever. Add relaxation to each day. Listen to your favorite music at work. Take a bubble bath. Close your eyes and do nothing except breathe d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes and Hot Weather - Staying Safe in the Heat There are hypo and hyper risks in hot weather Whether you are going on holiday or simply spending some time outdoors in the heat, high temperatures and the close humidity currently sweeping the UK do have an influence for people with long term conditions such as diabetes. This may partly be explained by increased activity in hot weather, but there is no doubt that the heat does affect some people with diabetes in other ways. What problems can hot weather cause for people with diabetes? Dehydration can be an issue in hot weather, and higher blood glucose levels can further increase this risk. People with diabetes may need to increase their intake of fluids in hot weather, drinking water regularly through the day. One of the major concerns regarding diabetes and hot weather is the risk of blood sugar levels rising or falling and causing hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia . What are the hypo risks from hot weather? Hot weather can increase the risk of hypoglycemia for those on blood glucose lowering medication. The Joslin Diabetes Centre notes that the bodys metabolism is higher in hot and humid weather which can lead to an increased chance of hypoglycemia. Hypos may be slightly harder to spot in hot weather. Dont be tempted to disregard hypo symptoms , such as sweating and tiredness, as a result of hot weather as it could be a sign of hypoglycemia. Take extra care when driving and test your blood sugar before and after each journey and stop regularly to check your blood sugar if taking longer journeys. To prevent hypos, be prepared to test your blood glucose more often, particularly if taking part in physical activity in hot weather. Keep a source of fasting carbohydrate, such as glucose tablets, to hand. To help treat hypos Continue reading >>

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