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Gestational Diabetes And Early Delivery

Do You Deliver Early If You Have Gestational Diabetes??

Do You Deliver Early If You Have Gestational Diabetes??

All Communities > Expecting > Do you deliver early if you have gestational diabetes?? Do you deliver early if you have gestational diabetes?? Samii - posted on 12/11/2009 ( 6 moms have responded ) I'm 19 and I'm about 31 weeks right now. I was tested for gestational diabetes and just my luck they told me that I have it. I was wondering if you deliver early due to the diabetes?? I've heard that with your first baby you usually deliver late but having diabetes I'm not sure now...? I recently had a doctors appointment and the doctor asked about my sugar levels and said that everything looks really good with them. She also told me that all I have to do is test 2 times a day twice a week. I was so happy to hear that everything is going well with my baby! I only have about 7 weeks to go until I can finally meet him! It seems like forever tho! lol I had gestational diabetes with my first and I delivered my first at 40 weeks 6 days. My doctors tried to pressure me into being induced, but there was no reason for it, the baby was fine, I was keeping my sugars easily in control and the due date is an ESTIMATION! There is no reason why you would have to deliver early just because of the gestational diabetes. Just keep your sugars in control, especially in your last 6 weeks of pregnancy because that is when your baby can gain the most weight. Good luck! Continue reading >>

Pre-existing Diabetes And Pregnancy

Pre-existing Diabetes And Pregnancy

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and are planning a family, you should plan your pregnancy as much as possible. Controlling your blood sugars before conception and throughout pregnancy gives you the best chance of having a trouble-free pregnancy and birth and a healthy baby. If you have diabetes and your pregnancy is unplanned, there’s still plenty you can do to give your baby the best start in life. The information on this page is for women who have diabetes before becoming pregnant. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Planned pregnancy Visit your doctor or diabetes educator at least 6 months before you start trying to fall pregnant, if you can. You will be given advice and guidance on controlling your blood sugars as tightly as possible, and taking necessary supplements like folate. You may also be advised to change medications. If you are healthy and your diabetes is well controlled when you become pregnant, you have a good a chance of having a normal pregnancy and birth. Diabetes that is not well controlled during pregnancy can affect your health long-term and can also be risky for your baby. Unplanned pregnancy Not everybody can plan their pregnancy. If you have diabetes and think you might be pregnant, see your doctor as soon as you can. Your healthcare team You may be cared for by a team of health professionals including: an obstetrician who can handle high risk pregnancies a specialist experienced in diabetes care during pregnancy, who may be an endocrinologist or who may be a general physician a diabetes educator to help you manage your diabetes a dietician who can provide dietary advice at all the different stages - before conception, while pregnant and after the birth a midwife who is experienced in all aspects Continue reading >>

Planned Birth At Or Near Term For Pregnant Women With Gestational Diabetes And Their Infants

Planned Birth At Or Near Term For Pregnant Women With Gestational Diabetes And Their Infants

Planned birth at or near term for pregnant women with gestational diabetes and their infants The aim of this Cochrane review was to find out if planning an elective birth at or near the term of pregnancy, compared to waiting for labour to start spontaneously, has an impact on the health of women with gestational diabetes and the health of their babies. Planned early birth means either induction of labour or caesarean birth, and 'at or near term' means 37 to 40 weeks' gestation. To answer this question, we collected and analysed all relevant studies conducted up to August 2017. Women with gestational diabetes (glucose intolerance arising during pregnancy) and their babies are at increased risk of health complications (e.g. high blood pressure, bigger babies). Because of the complications sometimes associated with birthing a big baby, many clinicians have recommended that women with gestational diabetes have an elective birth (generally an induction of labour) at or near term (37 to 40 weeks' gestation) rather than waiting for labour to start spontaneously, or until 41 weeks' gestation if all is well. Induction has disadvantages of increasing the incidence of forceps or ventouse births, and women often find it difficult to cope with an induced labour. Caesarean section is a major operation which can lead to blood loss, infections and increased chance of problems with subsequent births. Early birth can increase the chance of breathing problems for babies. It is important to know which approach to birth has a better impact on the health outcomes of women with gestational diabetes and their babies. Our search identified one trial involving 425 women and their babies. In this trial , 214 women had an induction of their labour at term, the other 211 women waited for a spontan Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

The latest guidance from NICE, published in 2015, has extended the time by which women with gestational diabetes should give birth to 40 weeks, 6 days – not much less than the general guidance for all pregnant women, which is 42 weeks. If you have not gone to birth at this point, induction of labour will be recommended. "When I was in the hospital, I felt I didn’t know what was going on. I would have liked more information about that part so I could have been better prepared." Gemma, mum of one The main reason for induction is to prevent stillbirth. For all women, the risk increases when their pregnancy goes past 42 weeks. However, one study has shown that women with gestational diabetes may be at risk earlier. So for this reason, the guidance in England and Wales states that if you have gestational diabetes, you should not go beyond 40 weeks, 6 days. An induction or caesarean may also be advised if your baby is very large (macrosomia) – as this may cause difficulties during the birth. On the other hand induction may also be recommended if the team detects poor growth in your baby. In Scotland, most women with diabetes in pregnancy are induced within 40 weeks. The guidance says that this decision should be determined on an individual basis. If you are taking diabetes medication or insulin, it recommends that you should be assessed at 38 weeks and delivered by 40 weeks. Choices you might need to make for labour and birth Most women with gestational diabetes have a healthy birth. But before you make your birth plan, you may need to take some things into account to make sure you and your baby are safe during and after the birth. If you have gestational diabetes, you will have less choice about where to deliver your baby. This is because you will need to deliver your Continue reading >>

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You & Your Baby

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You & Your Baby

When you're pregnant, hormone changes can make your blood sugar level rise. Gestational diabetes will raise the odds of pregnancy complications. After you're diagnosed, your doctor or midwife will want to watch your health and your baby's health closely for the rest of your pregnancy. Most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Getting good treatment makes all the difference. How Will It Affect My Baby? Your higher blood sugar affects your baby, too, since they gets nutrients from your blood. Your baby stores that extra sugar as fat, which can make them grow larger than normal. They're more likely to have certain complications: Injuries during delivery because of their size Low blood sugar and mineral levels when they're born Jaundice, a treatable condition that makes the skin yellowish Pre-term birth Later in life, your baby might have a greater chance of obesity and diabetes. So help your child live a healthy lifestyle -- it can lower their odds for these problems. How Will It Affect Me? You might have: A higher chance of needing a C-section Pre-term birth Your blood sugar will probably return to normal after you give birth. But you'll have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later or gestational diabetes again with another pregnancy. A healthy lifestyle can lower the odds of that happening. Just as you can help your child, you can lower your own chances of obesity and diabetes. Although you may need a C-section, many women with gestational diabetes have regular vaginal births. Talk to your doctor or midwife about your delivery options: Does my baby need to be delivered by C-section? How accurate are birth-weight estimates? Could my baby be smaller than you think? What are the risks to my baby and I if I don’t have a C-s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Early Delivery

Gestational Diabetes And Early Delivery

For those of you with gestational diabetes, just wondering if you have been told anything about being induced early, having an early scheduled c-section, or early spontaneous delivery. Just had an ultrasound where the baby is apparently weighing 5 pounds 4 ounces at 33 weeks which seems larger than the averages given for that week. I have my u/s on monday, but my Dr has told me b/c of Diabetes that babies tend to be larger and mom needs to be induced early but Im guessing depending on weight of baby and unless go into labour before the scheduled induction? Im 32 wks this coming monday and nervous to find out babys weight, but on positive side.....we will meet our baby earlier then expected if thats the case....i'm alright with that! :) Just not this early, maybe at 37 wks or so would be hoping. I had gestational diabetes as well and the doctor had me scheduled to be induced at 38 weeks because I was on insulin once a day. I was also having weekly ultrasounds to monitor the baby but when I asked about the baby's weight and how big she was, I was told that the margin for error with finding out the weight of a baby from an ultrasound was very large. So I never did get an answer. I was told the ultrasounds were to monitor that the baby was happy and active but that generally women with gestational diabetes carry bigger babies. I ended up going into labour naturally at 37 weeks and she was 4lbs 14 oz. she was in the nicu for 17 days. And the doctor there thought she was actually acting less mature then she should be and thought maybe my estimated due date was incorrect . Continue reading >>

Timing Of Delivery In Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Need For Person-centered, Shared Decision-making

Timing Of Delivery In Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Need For Person-centered, Shared Decision-making

Go to: Abstract Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a medical as well as obstetric challenge, which needs person-centered management. The timing of delivery of women with GDM is discussed by various obstetric professional bodies. We highlight pertinent medical, obstetric, and psychosocial factors which may influence the timing of delivery in women with GDM. This commentary proposes a person-centered approach to decide the delivery timing in GDM and supports shared decision-making based upon the individual’s biopsychosocial characteristics and environmental factors. Keywords: Antenatal corticosteroid therapy, Cephalopelvic disproportion, Diabetes, Fetomaternal distress, Labor, Macrosomia Go to: Introduction The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is rapidly increasing across the world and it is a common endocrine complication in obstetric practice today [1–3]. GDM, as a syndrome, is marked by controversy related to virtually every facet, ranging from its nomenclature, screening tools, and diagnosis to management strategies [4, 5]. Most debate on GDM management centers on medical issues, such as appropriateness of oral hypoglycemic agents. In this communication, we discuss the timing of delivery in GDM and emphasize the need for person-centered, shared decision-making in this regard. Compliance with Ethics Guidelines This article does not contain any new studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors. Go to: Current Recommendations Expert recommendations suggest that women with uncomplicated GDM take their pregnancies to term, and deliver at 38 weeks gestation [6]. Such a decision is not as simple as it seems. These recommendations differ from earlier findings, which suggested earlier induction of labor [7], but are consonant wi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (pronounced jess-TAY-shun-ul die-uh-BEET-eez) is one of the most common health problems for pregnant women. It affects about 5 percent of all pregnancies, which means there are about 200,000 cases each year. If not treated, gestational diabetes can cause health problems for mother and fetus. The good news is that gestational diabetes can be treated, especially if it is found early in the pregnancy. There are some things that women with gestational diabetes can do to keep themselves well and their pregnancies healthy. Controlling gestational diabetes is the key to a healthy pregnancy. and can be achieved by following the Gestational Diabetes Treatment Plan. Gestational Diabetes is a kind of diabetes that only pregnant women get. In fact, the word gestational means “during pregnancy.” If a woman gets diabetes or high blood sugar when she is pregnant, it is gestational diabetes. Diabetes Diabetes means your blood sugar is too high. Diabetes is a disease of metabolism, which is the way your body uses food for energy and growth. Your stomach and intestines break down (or digest) much of the food you eat into a simple sugar called glucose (pronounced GLOO-kos). Glucose is your body’s main source of energy. After digestion, the glucose passes into your bloodstream, which is why glucose is also called blood sugar. Once in the blood, the glucose is ready for your body cells to use. However, your cells need insulin (pronounced IN-suh-lin), a hormone made by your body, to get the glucose. Insulin “opens” your cells so that glucose can get in. When your metabolism is normal, your body makes enough insulin to move all the glucose smoothly from your bloodstream into your cells. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin and your cells Continue reading >>

Does Gestational Diabetes Always Mean A Big Baby And Induction?

Does Gestational Diabetes Always Mean A Big Baby And Induction?

July 3, 2012 by Rebecca Dekker, PhD, RN, APRN © Copyright Evidence Based Birth®. Please see disclaimer and terms of use. This question was submitted to me by one of my readers, Sarah. “I have a question about gestational diabetes. It seems like everyone I know who has had it has ended up being induced. Does gestational diabetes automatically mean induction? Does it automatically mean big babies? It seems like people get diagnosed and then give up on a natural childbirth and are treated as a sick person.” I talked to Dr. Shannon (a family medicine physician), and she echoed Sarah’s perceptions about gestational diabetes: “I would say that ‘routine care’ in the U.S. is to induce at 38 to 39 weeks for gestational diabetes (leaning towards 39 weeks nowadays) if the mom’s glucose is uncontrolled or if she is controlled on medication. However, women can technically be treated as ‘normal’ if their gestational diabetes is well controlled and baby’s growth looks normal on a 32 week scan. So people just might want to know they will get major push back from their provider if they refuse induction. It’s tough. Many OB’s cite the risk of stillbirth as a reason for induction, because the risk of stillbirth in women with regular diabetes is higher. However, there is no evidence that the risk of stillbirth goes up in gestational diabetes.” Evidence Based Birth® offers an online course on Big Babies and Gestational Diabetes (3 contact hours)! To learn more, click here! Dr. Shannon brings up several good points. First, she is talking about “routine care,” which is very different from “evidence-based care.” Routine care means that this is what everyone is doing—it’s routine, it’s standard. Evidence-based maternity care means offering care that is Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Premature Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Premature Birth

It happens because your body cannot produce enough insulin (a hormone important in controlling blood glucose) to meet its extra needs in pregnancy and/or because your body is more resistant than usual to insulin. The result is that blood sugar levels go up. It usually occurs in the second half of pregnancy but can arise earlier. Any woman can develop gestational diabetes though some women are at more risk than others (see below). Diabetes affects around three to five in every 100 pregnant women (3-5%). Most women who develop diabetes in pregnancy have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies but occasionally gestational diabetes can cause serious problems, especially if it goes unrecognised. It is associated with stillbirth and premature labour and needs careful monitoring to reduce these risks. Gestational diabetes starts during pregnancy and stops after the baby is born. What are the risks of gestational diabetes? Any form of diabetes - including diabetes that developed before the pregnancy - must be managed carefully because it is associated with complications such as: premature birth giving birth to a large baby having problems during the birth such as shoulder dystocia (where the shoulder gets stuck after delivery of the head) developing pre-eclampsia developing polyhydramnios – too much fluid around the baby the death of the baby around the time of the birth your baby developing problems with low blood sugar after birth needing an emergency caesarean section or having labour induced Your baby may also be at risk of becoming obese and/or developing diabetes later in life. Controlling your levels of blood glucose during pregnancy and labour reduces the risks of all these complications for you and your baby (see below). Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? You are a Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Premature Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Premature Birth

How GDM Affects Mothers, Babies, and the Birth Process Pregnant women with diabetes can have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. The key is to keep diabetes under control to minimize or prevent complications. The more complicated diabetes is, the more problems it can cause. And while gestational diabetes needs to be followed closely, if it is controlled well with diet, exercise, and medications if necessary, it is not likely to be as serious as pregestational diabetes (having type 2 or type 1 diabetes before becoming pregnant). Of course, there are still risks. Gestational diabetes, just like the other types of diabetes, can lead to premature birth as well as other complications, especially if it goes untreated. Your body uses sugar for energy. The sugar goes from your blood into your body's cells with the help of a hormone called insulin . Once the sugar is in the cells, it's converted to energy or stored. But, if the body doesn't make enough insulin, or it can't use the insulin well, then the sugar has trouble moving into the cells and stays in the blood instead. High levels of sugar in the blood is called diabetes mellitus. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. After the pregnancy ends, gestational diabetes usually goes away, and blood sugar levels typically return to normal. Why Does Gestational Diabetes Increase the Chances of Premature Birth? The complications caused by elevated blood sugar levels can increase the risk of premature birth. Studies show that the risk of premature delivery due to gestational diabetes is greater if a mother develops diabetes before the 24th week of pregnancy. After the 24th week, the chances of preterm birth go down. There are a number of complications that can result from gestational dia Continue reading >>

Early Gestational Diabetes Tied To Preterm Birth

Early Gestational Diabetes Tied To Preterm Birth

CHICAGO -- Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes prior to 24 weeks gestation were more likely to deliver a preterm baby compared with women diagnosed after 24 weeks, researchers reported here. "We found a 10.4-fold increase in preterm deliveries (prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy) in women who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes before 6 months of pregnancy (P<0.001)," said Ivan Ngai, MD, instructor in obstetrics and gynecology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Compared with women diagnosed later in their pregnancy, gestational diabetes prior to 24 weeks was also associated with a greater body mass index (35.2 kg/m versus 34.6 kg/m, P<0.01) and smaller birth weight (3,255 grams versus 3,448 grams, P<0.01), Ngai told MedPage Today at the annual meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. In the retrospective study, Ngai and colleagues did not observe differences in the incidence of large for gestational age infants between the 305 women who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes before 24 weeks and the 401 women who were diagnosed after 6 months. Ngai explained that in his population area, diabetes is highly prevalent so the standard of care at his facility is to screen all pregnant women for diabetes at their first visit to the prenatal clinic. In the study, women with a history of diabetes were excluded from the analysis. He said that ACOG guidelines call for diabetes testing after 24 weeks of pregnancy, but the findings of his group's study indicate that screening at the first antenatal visit should be performed, especially in populations that have a high incidence of diabetes. In a comment to MedPage Today, Rolanda Lister, MD, said that "early diagnosis of gestational diabetes co Continue reading >>

I Have Pregnancy Induced Gestational Diabetes, Is There Possibility That I Will Deliver My Baby Late

I Have Pregnancy Induced Gestational Diabetes, Is There Possibility That I Will Deliver My Baby Late

Because I had my first child born at 37 weeks will i give birth early again even if I have gestational diabetes? To my knowledge, most OB's will induce or take a baby early if the mother has GD. Most of those babies gain weight faster and the doctors might not want to chance you have a 10 pound baby. I had GD w/ our first child, and I monitored it very closely by diet. Our baby was born on her due date, perfectly healthy and a mere 7 pounds. Watch the sugars and carbs you eat, and GD is nothing more then a few stretch marks! I think it really depends on your doctor, so my best advice would be to talk to them. I was being checked twice a week with stress tests and once a week with ultrasounds, and my gestational diabetes was controlled with low doses of insulin daily. My OB would not induce me early because everything with my baby and I were fine, but he did say he wouldn't let me go past 41 weeks. I went into labor on my own on my due date and had my baby the next day. He was born weighing 7lbs 14oz and was completely healthy! Each pregnancy is different, so ask your OB. :) I hear most women with gestational diabetes are delivered early because of risk to the baby. I have GD that is controlled by diet alone and I at my 36 weeks appt, the ultrasound showed my baby to already be 7 lbs 7 oz and my dr. thinks if I go to term she will be over 9 lbs and needless to say he plans to induce me 2 weeks early...ad I have to say that I am kind of relieved so she will be safe and I not have to have a c-section and have to deal with a long recovery....your dr. will do what is best for you and your baby....there are too many risks to having a large baby...good luck to you... This is my 2nd pregnancy with GD. For the first one, I delivered 4 days late and baby was 8lbs even. Typically Continue reading >>

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