diabetestalk.net

Gestational Diabetes And Driving

Driving And Gestational Diabetes

Driving And Gestational Diabetes

Having diabetes is not an issue for driving but if you are put on insulin either as injections or pump for longer than three months you must inform the National Driver Licence Service. Pregnancy itself will require additional care with driving which is not covered here. When you commence insulin therapy you are advised to take the following precautions: • You must always carry your glucose meter and blood glucose strips with you. You must check your blood glucose before the first journey and every two hours whilst you are driving. • In each case if your blood glucose is 5.0mmol/l or less, take a snack. If it is less than 4.0mmol/l or you feel hypoglycaemic, do not drive and take appropriate action to correct glucose level. • If hypoglycaemia develops while driving, stop the vehicle as soon as possible. • You must switch off the engine, remove the keys from the ignition and move from the driver’s seat. • You must not start driving until 45 minutes after blood glucose has returned to normal. It takes up to 45 minutes for the brain to recover fully. • Always keep an emergency supply of fast-acting carbohydrate such as glucose tablets, lucozade or sweets within easy reach in the vehicle. • You should carry personal identification to show that you have diabetes in case of injury in a road traffic accident. • Particular care should be taken during changes of insulin regimens and as the pregnancy progresses. • You must take regular meals, snacks and rest periods on long journeys. Always avoid alcohol. Hypoglycaemia Hypoglycaemia (also known as a hypo) is the medical term for a low blood glucose (sugar) level. Severe hypoglycaemia means that the assistance of another person is required. The risk of hypoglycaemia is the main danger to safe driving and this ri Continue reading >>

New Dvla Standards For Diabetic Drivers

New Dvla Standards For Diabetic Drivers

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) published new standards for drivers who have diabetes mellitus a little over a year ago,1 allowing people with diabetes to drive group 2 vehicles (buses and lorries) for the first time in certain circumstances. Drivers who take insulin are still not allowed to drive emergency vehicles. It is drivers' responsibility to keep the DVLA informed of their diabetic status and how it affects their ability to drive, but GPs need to be aware of the latest standards and their legal and ethical responsibilities. Group 2 vehicles Drivers on insulin or oral medication that can induce hypoglycaemia can drive a group 2 vehicle provided they: Have had no episodes of hypoglycaemia requiring the assistance of another person in the past 12 months. Have full hypoglycaemic awareness (that is, are able to avoid the onset of hypoglycaemia by taking action after warning symptoms). Can demonstrate regular blood glucose monitoring at least twice daily with a meter with memory function. Have no other debarring complications of diabetes, such as eye problems. The DVLA will arrange annual review by an independent diabetic consultant, who must examine three months of blood sugar readings, which the patient collects on a blood glucose meter. If patients change from oral hypoglycaemics to insulin, they must tell the DVLA and stop driving group 2 vehicles.2 Group 1 vehicles Drivers must inform the DVLA if they are taking insulin. Drivers of group 1 vehicles (cars and motorbikes) using insulin must have an awareness of hypoglycaemia, have adequate blood glucose monitoring, not be a danger to the public and meet eyesight standards. Patients must inform the DVLA if they have had more than one episode of hypoglycaemia requiring assistance from another person in Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Treatment Summary | Bnf Provided By Nice

Diabetes | Treatment Summary | Bnf Provided By Nice

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders in which persistent hyperglycaemia is caused by deficient insulin secretion or by resistance to the action of insulin. This leads to the abnormalities of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism that are characteristic of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are the two most common classifications of diabetes. Other common types of diabetes are gestational diabetes (develops during pregnancy and resolves after delivery) and secondary diabetes (may be caused by pancreatic damage, hepatic cirrhosis, or endocrine disease). Treatment with endocrine, antiviral, or antipsychotic drugs may also cause secondary diabetes. Drivers with diabetes may be required to notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) of their condition depending on their treatment, the type of licence they hold, and whether they have diabetic complications (including episodes of hypoglycaemia). All drivers who are treated with insulin must inform the DVLA, with some exceptions for temporary treatment. Detailed guidance on notification requirements, eligibility to drive, and precautions required, is available from the DVLA at www.gov.uk/guidance/diabetes-mellitus-assessing-fitness-to-drive The DVLA recommends (2016) that drivers with diabetes need to be particularly careful to avoid hypoglycaemia and should be informed of the warning signs and actions to take. Drivers treated with insulin should always carry a glucose meter and blood-glucose strips when driving, and check their blood-glucose concentration no more than 2 hours before driving and every 2 hours while driving. More frequent self-monitoring may be required if, for any reason, there is a greater risk of hypoglycaemia, such as after physical activity Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drivers Who Use Insulin Can Be Fined Up To £1000 If They Fail To Tell Dvla This

Diabetic Drivers Who Use Insulin Can Be Fined Up To £1000 If They Fail To Tell Dvla This

Whether you have a car, motorbike, bus, coach or lorry licence, if your diabetes is treated by insulin they must tell the DVLA (or DVA in Northern Ireland). Failing to do so will result in a £1,000 fine, and if you become involved in an accident you may even be prosecuted. The measures have been put in place to ensure drivers’ safety on the roads. But what happens once you inform DVLA of your condition? Whether you have a car, motorbike, bus, coach or lorry licence, if your diabetes is treated by insulin they must tell the DVLA If you have a car or motorbike licence, you fall under the Group 1 driver category, and your licence will be renewed every one, two or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment between each licence renewal should be reported. Drivers who are under medical supervision by a doctor and are only using insulin for a temporary period (less than three months) do not need to notify DVLA. The same applies for women with gestational diabetes less than three months after delivery. Mon, January 1, 2018 What types of Diabetes are there? From Types 1 & 2 to Gestational diabetes. If you are diabetic but not on insulin medication you do not need to let DVLA know. The only times you would are are listed by Diabetes UK: If you have had two episodes of severe hypoglycaemia within the last 12 months (where you ere completely dependent on another person to treat your hypo). You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (where you are unable to recognise the hypo when it starts). You experience a disabling hypo while driving. You have other medical conditions or changes to existing medical conditions which could affect your ability to drive safely. Examples are problems with vision (e.g. laser treatment/injections), circulation, or sensation (e.g. p Continue reading >>

Yourdiabetes - Dvla

Yourdiabetes - Dvla

If you are on a diabetes medication that requires you to inform the DVLA, (see table) it is your responsibility to do so. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels) can lead to confusion and affect your ability to drive. This can increase the risk of accidents. Your ability to recognize and treat hypos, and the development of diabetes complications, may affect your ability to drive safely. By law you must inform the DVLA if you are on any of the medications listed in table 1 and / or You need laser treatment on both eyes, or in the remaining eye - if you have sight in one eye only. You are unable to read (with glasses or contact lenses if necessary) a car number plate at 20.5 metres (67 feet) or 20 metres (65 feet) where narrower characters are used. You develop any problems with your circulation or sensation in your legs or feet that make it necessary for you to drive certain types of adapted vehicles. You suffer from more than one episode of severe hypoglycaemia (severe hypoglycaemia is defined as a hypo requiring a third party intervention to treat the hypo) within 12 months, or if you or a carer are at high risk of developing severe hypoglycaemia. For Group 2 (bus or lorry) one episode of hypoglycaemia should be reported immediately. You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (delay or difficulty in recognizing the warning symptoms of a low blood glucose level) You suffer severe hypoglycaemia while driving. An existing medical condition get worse or you develop any other condition that my affect your driving ability. For drivers on insulin you must inform the DVLA, your licence will then be renewed every one, two or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment which occurs between renewals should be reported when they happen and not wait until your ren Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Dvla Guide

Diabetes Mellitus - Dvla Guide

Advice for medical professionals for drivers with diabetes mellitus. X - Must not drive ! - May continue to drive subject to medical advice and/or notifying the DVLA √ - May continue to drive and need not notify the DVLA Diabetes mellitus Information sent to drivers Insulin-treated drivers are sent a detailed letter from the DVLA explaining the licensing requirements and driving responsibilities. All drivers with diabetes must follow the information provided in 'Information for drivers with diabetes', which includes a notice of when they must contact the DVLA (see Appendix D). Insulin-treated diabetes Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia The Secretary of State's Honorary Medical Advisory Panel on Driving and Diabetes has defined impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia for Group 1 drivers as 'an inability to detect the onset of hypoglycaemia because of total absence of warning symptoms'. Group 2 drivers must have full awareness of hypoglycaemia. Severe hypoglycaemia 'Severe' is defined as hypoglycaemia requiring another person's assistance. Group 1 Car and motorcycle Group 2 Bus and lorry ! - Must meet the criteria to drive and must notify the DVLA. All the following criteria must be met for the DVLA to license the person with insulin-treated diabetes for 1, 2 or 3 years: ♦ adequate awareness of hypoglycaemia ♦ no more than 1 episode of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding 12 months ♦ practises appropriate blood glucose monitoring as defined below ♦ not regarded as a likely risk to the public while driving ♦ meets the visual standards for acuity and visual field (see Chapter 6, visual disorders). ! - Must meet the criteria to drive and must notify the DVLA. All the following criteria must be met for the DVLA to license the person with insulin-treated diabetes for Continue reading >>

Driving And Diabetes Complications

Driving And Diabetes Complications

You must be able to read a registration plate at a distance of 20 metres In general, diabetic complications are not necessarily a barrier to driving, as long as ones ability to drive is not impaired. However, there are several diabetes complications that can affect your suitability to drive. Driving with diabetic retinopathy and eye problems The basic sight requirement for driving is to be able to read a vehicle registration plate from a distance of 20 metres. People should also have a minimum field of vision of at least 120 degrees. Conditions including diabetic retinopathy , cataracts, the loss of vision in one eye (monocular vision), glaucoma need not necessarily prevent you from driving where the basic sight requirement can still be met. If you have received laser eye surgery to treat diabetic retinopathy in both eyes (or one eye if you have monocular vision), you will need to inform the DVLA of this. The requirements are set tighter for the driving of heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) and passenger carrying vehicles (PCVs). If you have lost your awareness of hypos , you should not drive. If you are taking insulin as a result of gestational diabetes, the DVLA states that you neednt inform them unless you take insulin for a period of over 3 months, or if you suffer from disabling hypoglycaemia whilst taking it. Driving with cardiovascular disease and other heart problems Cardiovascular problems tend to only be a problem if the symptoms themselves are present. If you have doubts about whether a heart condition may affect your suitability to drive, contact the DVLA. Driving with circulation trouble and/or nerve damage If you have problem with nerve damage affecting your feet and legs (peripheral neuropathy) that affects your driving competency, you should inform the DVLA. D Continue reading >>

Driving

Driving

The guidelines for diabetes and driving have recently been updated. This page and resources are currently under review. Please visit the Austroads website for more information. In March 2012, new medical standards came into effect for drivers of both private and commercial vehicles. The new standards are contained in the Austroads document Assessing Fitness to Drive 2012, which replaces the previous standards (Assessing Fitness to Drive 2003). The new standards include the following: Private vehicle drivers treated by glucose-lowering agents other than insulin may generally drive without licence restriction but should be required to have five-yearly reviews. In addition to the sections on hypoglycaemia, there is now a new section on hyperglycaemia for commercial drivers whose diabetes is treated by either insulin or other glucose lowering agents and for private drivers whose diabetes is treated with insulin. The new medical standards address ‘satisfactory control’ of diabetes and state that satisfactory control “will generally be defined as a glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level of less than 9.0% measured within the preceding three months”. The use of the term ‘generally’ is intended to allow medical practitioners to make their own clinical judgements on the ‘satisfactory control’ of diabetes on a case-by-case basis. ‘Satisfactory control’ of diabetes is required for a conditional licence to be considered by the driver licence authority. If you take medication for diabetes and you are a commercial driver, you must have an annual review by a specialist in endocrinology or diabetes to ensure you meet the specific criteria to hold a conditional licence. If you are a private driver and your diabetes is treated with insulin you must have a review at least e Continue reading >>

Safe Driving With Diabetes

Safe Driving With Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean that you have to give up driving but it does mean that you need to think ahead before you get behind the wheel. ••••• Diabetes and driving Having diabetes does not mean that you have to give up driving but it does mean that you need to think ahead before you get behind the wheel. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) and the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA, in Northern Ireland), want to ensure that everyone on the road is fit to drive. Changes to your general health can affect your ability to drive such as; visual problems or laser treatment, loss of muscle strength or balance due to a stroke or other serious medical conditions. Some of the complications associated with diabetes, such as loss of sensation in the feet due to nerve damage, frequent or severe hypoglycaemia (low glucose levels) can also affect your ability to drive and this might affect the type of driving licence you have. Informing the DVLA/DVA Since your treatments and circumstances may change over time, you need to check to see whether you need to tell the DVLA or DVA about those changes. Your diabetes care team may also advise you to notify the DVLA/DVA about your fitness to drive. The best way to do this is to contact them directly. It is your responsibility to tell them; however, if you are unable to do this for any reason, your doctor has an obligation to do so on your behalf. Recent changes to the law resulting from a European Directive have led to the introduction of stricter rules for drivers of cars and motorcycles (Group 1 vehicles). You need to say you are treated with insulin when you apply or reapply for a licence.1 People treated with insulin can now apply for a licence to drive a lorry and passenger carrying vehicles (Group 2 vehicles) as lon Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes: How To Stay Safe

Driving With Diabetes: How To Stay Safe

For many Americans, driving is a big part of life. Most people with diabetes can do it safely, but there are some things to keep in mind before you get behind the wheel. First, if you take insulin or medications called sulfonylureas or meglitinides to manage your diabetes, your blood sugar might go to low, called hypoglycemia. That can make it hard for you to concentrate on the road and react to what’s going on around you. You might not be able to see clearly, and you could pass out behind the wheel. If you’re not sure whether your diabetes medication can cause low blood sugar, ask your doctor or pharmacist. (Sometimes very high blood sugar can make it unsafe for you to drive, but it’s not as common. Ask your doctor how high is too high to be on the road.) Second, over time diabetes can cause other health problems that can affect your driving. Nerve damage in your legs and feet can make it hard for you to feel the pedals. Diabetes can also hurt your vision by damaging blood vessels in your eyes or making you more likely to get cataracts. A little bit of preparation can go a long way toward keeping you safe on the road. Check your blood sugar. Before you drive, make sure your blood sugar is at least 80 mg/dL. If it’s lower than that, have a snack with 15 grams of carbohydrate. Wait 15 minutes, then check again. Bring snacks. Stock your car with some snacks that have fast-acting carbohydrates in case your blood sugar starts to go too low. Try glucose tablets or gel, regular soda (not diet), and juice boxes or snack bars that won’t go bad if you leave them in the car. Bring your meter. You might have to check your blood sugar along the way. Don’t leave it in the car when you’re not driving, though. Extreme heat or cold can damage it. Wear your medical ID. If Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

Patient Information - 1 - Maternity Services GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes (GDM) is the term used to describe diabetes that is first diagnosed during pregnancy, usually through a blood test at 24–28 weeks into pregnancy. Usually it will disappear after the baby is born but will usually re-occur in any later pregnancies. With good management of gestational diabetes, you can increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and baby. WHY DO WOMEN DEVELOP GDM The hormones produced during pregnancy can make it difficult for your body to use insulin properly, putting you at an increased risk of insulin resistance. And, because pregnancy places a heavy demand on the body, some women are less able to produce enough insulin to overcome this resistance. This makes it difficult to use glucose properly for energy, so the glucose remains in the blood and the levels rise, leading to gestational diabetes. Women most at risk of developing gestational diabetes are those who:  Are overweight or obese  Have a family history of diabetes  Have had a previous ‘big’ baby, over 4.5kg.  Are from certain ethnic backgrounds HOW DOES GDM AFFECT MY BABY? If your blood sugar levels are consistently high sugar will cross over to the baby via the placenta. Baby will produce high levels of insulin which will make him or her grow rapidly. They can get very large around the middle and the top half of their body this can make delivery of the baby difficult and can mean that the shoulders get stuck during delivery. You are more likely to have an Induction of your labour or a caesarean birth. As a result of the baby producing too much insulin before he/she is born, they may have a low blood sugar until they regulate their own insulin production. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Driving

Gestational Diabetes And Driving

This site is intended for healthcare professionals With respect to Group 1 entitlement to drive: If temporary insulin treatment e.g. gestational diabetes, post-myocardial infarction, participants in oral/inhaled insulin trials. provided they are under medical supervision and have not been advised by their doctor that they are at risk of disabling hypoglycaemia, need not notify DVLA. If experiencing disabling hypoglycaemia, DVLA should be notified notify DVLA if treatment continues for more than 3 months or for more than 3 months after delivery for gestational diabetes Otherwise guidance is as for diabetes and driving (linked item). For up to date guidance then consult the DVLA website. The information provided herein should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical practitioner should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Copyright 2016 Oxbridge Solutions Ltd. Any distribution or duplication of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. Oxbridge Solutions Ltd receives funding from advertising but maintains editorial independence. GPnotebook stores small data files on your computer called cookies so that we can recognise you and provide you with the best service. If you do not want to receive cookies please do not use GPnotebook. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Assessing Fitness To Drive

Diabetes Mellitus: Assessing Fitness To Drive

✘- Must not drive ! - May continue to drive subject to medical advice and/or notifying the DVLA ✓- May continue to drive and need not notify the DVLA Diabetes mellitus Insulin-treated drivers are sent a detailed letter from the DVLA explaining the licensing requirements and driving responsibilities. All drivers with diabetes must follow the information provided in ‘Information for drivers with diabetes’, which includes a notice of when they must contact the DVLA (see Appendix D). Insulin-treated diabetes Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia The Secretary of State’s Honorary Medical Advisory Panel on Driving and Diabetes has defined impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia for Group 1 drivers as ‘an inability to detect the onset of hypoglycaemia because of total absence of warning symptoms’. Group 2 drivers must have full awareness of hypoglycaemia. ‘Severe’ is defined as hypoglycaemia requiring another person’s assistance. Group 1 Car and motorcycle Group 2 Bus and lorry ! - Must meet the criteria to drive and must notify the DVLA. All the following criteria must be met for the DVLA to license the person with insulin-treated diabetes for 1, 2 or 3 years: ■ adequate awareness of hypoglycaemia ■ no more than 1 episode of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding 12 months ■ practises appropriate blood glucose monitoring as defined below ■ not regarded as a likely risk to the public while driving ■ meets the visual standards for acuity and visual field (see Chapter 6, visual disorders). ! - Must meet the criteria to drive and must notify the DVLA. All the following criteria must be met for the DVLA to license the person with insulin-treated diabetes for 1 year (with annual review as indicated last below): ■ full awareness of hypoglycaemia ■ no episo Continue reading >>

Now You've Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes Does This Effect Driving?

Now You've Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes Does This Effect Driving?

Did you know that all women diagnosed with gestational diabetes should contact their vehicle Insurance providers to inform them of diagnosis? Many companies may say it's fine and that they do not need to know, but we advise that you get them to put a note on their system to protect yourself should you need to make a claim as by law it is YOUR responsibility to disclose this information. Informing your insurance provider should not effect your premium. DVLA notification If you control your gestational diabetes by diet or metformin, you do not need to notify the DVLA of your diagnosis. If insulin is used to control your gestational diabetes it is classed as temporary insulin treatment. You only need to inform the DVLA if you will be using insulin for 3 months or more, or if you continue to use insulin following the birth of your baby (i.e. you are diagnosed with type 1 or 2 diabetes following birth) for 3 months or more. Driving & gestational diabetes when using insulin - "five to drive" If you use insulin or glibenclamide to control your blood sugar levels then you are at risk of hypoglycaemia. Due to this risk, you should test your blood sugar levels before driving, every time you drive. It's advisable for your levels to be 5.0mmol/L or above before driving. Remember this phrase "five to drive." If you test and levels are below 5.0 then you should eat a snack which is suitable for the GD diet, which will raise levels slightly but not enough to cause hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar levels). If at any point you feel unwell then you should stop your vehicle in a safe place and test your blood sugar levels to check for hypoglycaemia. Leave yourself 15 mins before leaving to test and eat if needs be. Good foods to try for raising levels without spiking blood sugar levels to Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Me

Diabetes & Me

Diabetes is a chronic disease with serious complications, currently affecting an estimated 1.7 million Australians. Almost 300 Australians develop diabetes every day, yet research shows that most Australians think diabetes is not a serious illness and believe they have a lower risk of developing it than they actually do. Diabetes Mellitus (Diabetes) is the name given to a group of conditions that occurs when the level of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood becomes higher than normal. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from your blood stream, into the cells of your body where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, the body either can’t make enough insulin or the insulin that is being made does not work properly. This causes your blood glucose level to become too high. High blood glucose levels can affect both your short and long term health. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. At this stage there is no known cure for either type of diabetes, although diabetes can be well managed. Diabetes Facts Over 100,000 Australian adults develop diabetes each year More than 1.2 million Australians are currently diagnosed with diabetes. Including undiagnosed Australians, it is estimated that about 1.7 million people in Australia have diabetes An estimated 2–3 million Australians have pre-diabetes and are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes Every year 20,000 women in Australia develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy How is diabetes diagnosed? Diabetes is diagnosed by a blood test. Most people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes will present with symptoms of diabetes such as: increased thirst, urination and tiredness. Some people will also have signs of slow healing of wounds or persistent infections. However many p Continue reading >>

More in diabetes