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Gestational Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Perinatal Risk Factors For Development Of Celiac Disease In Children, Based Onthe Prospective Norwegian Mother And Child Cohort Study.

Perinatal Risk Factors For Development Of Celiac Disease In Children, Based Onthe Prospective Norwegian Mother And Child Cohort Study.

1. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 May;13(5):921-7. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2014.10.012.Epub 2014 Oct 18. Perinatal risk factors for development of celiac disease in children, based onthe prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Emilsson L(1), Magnus MC(2), Strdal K(3). (1)Primary Care Research Unit, Vrdcentralen Vrmlands Nyster, County Council of Vrmland, Sweden; Department of Health Management and Health Economy, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: [email protected] (2)Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. (3)Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Paediatric Department, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway. BACKGROUND & AIMS: There have been inconsistent reports of prenatal and perinatalfactors that affect risk for development of celiac disease. We assessed theassociation of fetal growth, birth weight, and mode of delivery with development of celiac disease within the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort Study.METHODS: The MoBa cohort contains pregnancy information on 95,200 women and data on their 114,500 children, which were collected in Norway from 1999 through 2008;it is linked to the Medical Birth Registry. Women and children with celiacdisease were identified from the National Patient Registry and from women'sresponses to MoBa questionnaires. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for celiacdisease by using a multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting formaternal celiac disease, sex of children, and children's age (model 1); in asecond model, we adjusted for age of gluten introduction and duration ofbreastfeeding (model 2).RESULTS: We identified 650 children with celiac disease and 107,828 controls inthe MoBa Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

As with many issues related to pregnancy and parenting, there are many myths and misconceptions about gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes has been a controversial topic for some time, with even world famous obesterician, Michel Odent, weighing in on the matter. Some medical and health professionals believe gestational diabetes (not to be confused with type 1 diabetes) is a “diagnosis looking for a disease”, because the steps to manage it is exactly the same as the advice to prevent it – with diet. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are given a label, without any evidence to show that the label improves outcomes. Low carb, high healthy fat eating, quitting smoking and exercise is how you prevent and treat insulin resistance. As Doctor Chatterjee says, “Our genes load the gun, but it's our environment that pulls the trigger”. Our addiction to sugar and processed foods is literally making us — and our future children — sick. If you haven't yet read about the 3 year old who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it's a must read. Women Need Educating, Not Testing A diagnosis of gestational diabetes results in the very advice which should already be given to all pregnant women — long before their glucose tolerance tests. They should eat a low GI diet, eliminate sugar and processed grains, as well as get some daily exercise. Very wise advice for all of us, regardless if we're pregnant or not. A recent study concluded, “A low GI diet was associated with less frequent insulin use and lower birth weight than control diets, suggesting that it is the most appropriate dietary intervention to be prescribed to patients with GDM [gestational diabetes mellitus].” However, the vast majority of doctors and midwives are not trained nutritionists, dieticians Continue reading >>

Connections Between Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Connections Between Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Daniel Leffler, M.D., is director of research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He divides his time between patient care and research in celiac disease and other digestive disorders. A recipient of a National Institutes of Health career development grant, he is also a medical advisor to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. He is the co-author of Real Life with Celiac Disease: Troubleshooting and Thriving Gluten Free. In this article, he answers reader questions about the link between celiac disease and diabetes. What are the connections between celiac disease and diabetes? We first have to distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is early onset and is an autoimmune disease that develops typically in children and adolescents. Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in adults, is not an autoimmune disease, and is associated with obesity, high cholesterol and related disorders collectively known as “metabolic syndrome.” Type 1 diabetes is highly linked to celiac disease on a genetic level, and 5 to 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease. Because celiac disease is usually diagnosed later in life, it is most common to have diabetes first. It’s quite uncommon for someone to be diagnosed with celiac disease first and then develop type 1 diabetes, unless the person is diagnosed with celiac disease very young. In contrast, we don’t know a lot about type 2 diabetes and celiac disease. Our group just published a research study that shows those with celiac disease are much less likely to get type 2 diabetes compared to people without celiac disease. This was an unexpected finding and to our knowledge is the first study lo Continue reading >>

Coeliac Disease And Diabetes

Coeliac Disease And Diabetes

Coeliac disease is a lifelong condition where your immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. This immune reaction damages the lining of your gut, making it hard to absorb nutrients from food properly. Coeliac disease is more common in people with Type 1 diabetes because both are autoimmune conditions. Up to 10 per cent of people with coeliac disease also have Type 1 diabetes. If you have Type 2 diabetes you’re not at increased risk of coeliac disease as Type 2 diabetes isn’t an autoimmune condition. However, there are many people who have coeliac disease, but don’t know it. Here, we answer all your questions about the symptoms, treatment and management of coeliac disease and diabetes. What are the symptoms? They range from mild to severe and include: diarrhoea bloating nausea mouth ulcers tummy aches unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases) hair loss anaemia What is the treatment? Coeliac disease is not the same as having a food allergy or being sensitive to particular foods. The only treatment, once you have been diagnosed, is to cut gluten out of your diet completely for the rest of your life. How can I tell if a food contains gluten? New UK food labelling laws make it easier to choose gluten-free foods. By law, manufacturers must list the ingredients containing gluten in bold. These include wheat (including spelt, Kamut and seitan), triticale, barley and oats. Common foods and drinks that aren’t suitable for people with coeliac disease include: wheat barley (including products that contain malted barley, such as malted drinks, beers, ales, lagers and stouts) bulgar wheat couscous durum wheat einkorn emmer (also known as faro) khorasan wheat (commercially known as Kamut) pearl barley rye seitan semolina spelt triticale Can Continue reading >>

Coeliac Disease

Coeliac Disease

Coeliac Disease is a condition where the lining of the small intestine is damaged due to sensitivity to a protein in food called gluten. Gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye, oats, barley and triticale. Coeliac Disease and diabetes may occur together and is more common in people with type 1 than type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that up to 10% of people with type 1 diabetes may have Coeliac Disease. The following symptoms are often associated with Coeliac Disease: Diarrhoea Streatorrhoea (floating, fatty stools) Loss of weight Abdominal bloating or distension Flatulence. If you think that you have Coeliac Disease, you should first approach your doctor. A medical history and an examination will be performed and, if thought necessary, further tests will be undertaken to help diagnose the condition. You may be referred to a specialist. If Coeliac Disease is suspected, a gluten free diet should not be started until the condition is properly diagnosed, otherwise this will interfere with the correct diagnosis. The gluten free diet should always be undertaken with medical supervision. A gluten-free diet is currently the only known treatment for Coeliac Disease. Gluten-free foods include corn, rice, sago, tapioca, buckwheat, potato, soy, arrowroot, fresh fruit, vegetables, meat (except most processed meats), poultry, fish and most dairy foods. Grains, wheat, rye, oats, barley and triticale, processed foods with ingredients such as wheaten corn flour, wheat starch, malt, malt extract, malt dextrin and the thickeners 1400 to 1450, all contain gluten. If you are diagnosed with Coeliac Disease, gluten containing foods must be avoided along with products made from these foods. This includes many breads, cereals, biscuits, cakes, scones, pizzas, pies and processed fo Continue reading >>

Celiac With Gestational Diabetes

Celiac With Gestational Diabetes

Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 09/30/2015 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes My wife just tested positive for gestational diabetes. She is 31 weeks pregnant and a celiac. She tested negative for GD with our first son. She is going to a dietician this Weds for help on a meal plan. Does anyone know of some good gluten-free recipes that are no sugar added? My wife just tested positive for gestational diabetes. She is 31 weeks pregnant and a celiac. She tested negative for GD Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/Primal for My Gestational Diabetes Ive been interested in Paleolithic (or paleo) diets for ages, but it always seemed difficult to give up my favorite croissants and ciabatta bread and fully embrace the lifestyle. Plus, I have a wheat-addicted daughter and husband to deal with.Ive tried removing wheat from the house from time to time, but it usually results in some sort of mutiny and my dear hubby making panicked runs to Costco for massive packs of apple turnovers. I found him hiding some in his car last year and decided I may have been a wee bit extreme in my war on gluten. However, I got a wake up call last year when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD) fairly early on in my recent pregnancy with our twins. Gestational diabetes is much more common with twin pregnancies, but the diagnosis upset me. It seemed that getting a diagnosis of gestational diabetes triggered the five stages of grief! My first step was definitely denial: How could I possibly have gestational diabetes? I eat very healthy foods overall (well at least according to conventional holistic nutrition)plenty of healthy whole grains, beans, legumes, organic vegetables, fruit, grass-fed beef, and organic chicken. Oh, and wild salmon of courseI do live in the Pacific Northwest!I also love my dark chocolate , but Im more likely to make glucomannan pudding than cupcakes. (Okay, sometimes we have cupcakes.) I was tested for gestational diabetes earlier in my pregnancy than most because of my symptoms (hyperemesis gravidarum, constant thirst, and needing to pee even more than the average pregnant woman) and the high risk of GD with twins. My test results were marginal, and it was still early, so, convinced this was all a giant mistake, I started monitoring my blood sugars four times Continue reading >>

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Have you ever stood in the middle of a see-saw, right over the center with one foot on each side? Trying hard not to put more weight on one side to keep it stable? Unless you are incredibly focused, it can be very difficult to keep a proper balance without one side touching the ground. The struggle is similar when trying to balance two medical conditions, such as diabetes and celiac disease. While each one has specific needs, they both need to stay balanced which can be hard to achieve. This article explains celiac disease and its relationship with diabetes. What is celiac disease? It’s a condition where the body recognizes gluten, a protein found in some foods, as a poison. The body tries to attack it to prevent it from being digested and entering into the bloodstream. When someone with celiac eats gluten (which is found in foods that are made with rye, wheat, or barley), the small intestines react by changing the lining. Normally, there are long, fingerlike structures that line our intestines that absorb the nutrients in the food that we eat. With celiac disease, those finger-like structures become flat to protect the body from absorbing the gluten. Additionally, the gut stops making digestive enzymes, to also prevent from any absorption. The image below gives a good illustration of what happens in the small intestines when gluten is eaten. The problem with this is that over time, it permanently damages the small intestines and prevents nutrients and vitamins from being absorbed. Long-term malabsorption can cause issues such as: Osteoporosis Anemia Infertility Organ disorders Delayed puberty Stunted growth Inability to gain weight Weak tooth enamel Seizures Depression Currently, 1 in 133 healthy people have celiac disease, and that number seems to be increasing. Bec Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes & Autoimmune

Gestational Diabetes & Autoimmune

Gestational diabetes mellitus is chronically high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) that starts in or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. Like other forms of glucose (blood sugar) intolerance, gestational diabetes is characterized by pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, which produces insufficient insulin to meet the body’s needs. Usually there are no signs or symptoms with gestational diabetes, but when present, they are generally mild and include fatigue, increased urination, excessive thirst, blurred vision, and slight weight loss; and there is a higher risk of skin, bladder and vaginal infections. Blood sugar regulation usually returns to normal after delivery of the baby. Available evidence suggests that β-cell defects in gestational diabetes result from the same spectrum of causes that underlie hyperglycemia in general, such as genetic issues, insulin resistance, pancreatic injury due to toxicity and autoimmune disease. Is gestational diabetes an autoimmune condition? Gestational diabetes occurs in 3-10% of pregnant women. The vast majority (roughly 90%) of gestational diabetes cases are not considered a result of autoimmune complications. Instead, in these cases, pregnancy hormones increase insulin resistance (an effect seen, to a lesser extent, in normal pregnancies as well), which inhibits the transfer of glucose from the bloodstream into cells. Gestational diabetes is typically only present during pregnancy (resolves once the baby is born), though it can increase risk for type-1 or type-2 diabetes onset later in life. Who is most at risk of gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, like type-2 diabetes, occurs more often in African Americans, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, and among women with a family history of diabetes. Women are at higher risk if they ha Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Celiac

Gestational Diabetes And Celiac

I am 43 y/o, 31 weeks, and was just diagnosed with gestational diabetes. I am otherwise very healthy and already follow a strict diet because of Celiac Disease and hypoglycemia. I just found out the glucose drink they gave me was not gluten free, which is critical for Celiac, and I'm wondering if that alone could throw off the test results. Everything else has been perfect, so this was a shock especially since I already follow a good diet. I don't know the answer specifically, but I was told that a stress in the system, including eating foods to which you ate allergic can cause elevated results. It's worth asking about! If you start doing finger pricks with your regular diet, you will also see where your blood sugars are. Good luck! I go see the specialist tomorrow and I will certainly ask. Thanks. @magickhands I was put on an exercise restriction at 28 weeks and at 31 weeks, just failed my 3-hr glucose by 2 points, so they're calling me borderline and making me monitor. The funny part was going to the diabetic nurse and showing her that I already eat a diet relatively close to the prescribed one. I think my diagnosis was BS and that my body was off because of the lack of exercise after 20 years. So far, I'm very unimpressed with this baby factory mentality of shoving every woman in one category or another without considering individualized information! I agree. They are calling mine borderline, and my diet is already very good, still, I go meet with the diabetes counselor on July 5th. I think the diagnosis is bs, but I am ok with the extra monitoring. I just don't want to have to check my blood five times a day til this baby is born. I don't really fit into the GD stereotypical mold, and it's taken a bit of experimentation to really understand how to best understand w Continue reading >>

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Managing diabetes means monitoring your carbohydrate intake to help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. An additional diagnosis of celiac disease adds another layer of complexity to eating. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which people cannot tolerate gluten.1 Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—it helps dough rise and keep its shape and texture. Treatment of celiac includes eating a gluten-free diet. Common foods that are made with gluten include:2 pasta; bread; cereal; beverages such as beer; couscous; tortillas; crackers; cookies, cakes, muffins, and pastries; dressings, sauces, and gravies; and wheat-based flours such as white flour, wheat flour, kamut, semolina, spelt, and wheat bran. This list might seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of gluten-free versions of popular foods such as bread, pasta, and crackers that can be found in your local grocery store. For people with celiac and diabetes, however, it is important to consider the carb count—especially because many gluten-free foods are made with flours that contain less fiber and have a higher glycemic index. The golden rule? Get in the habit of checking the labels of anything you put in your mouth or on your skin (for both gluten and carbs). Hide-and-Seek with Gluten Labels can sometimes be deceiving. Just because something is labeled as “wheat-free” does not mean it is gluten-free. Always examine labels for buzz words such as wheat, barley, or rye, and if you have any questions, contact the manufacturer directly before eating. Certain additives in packaged foods contain traces of gluten—ask your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease for a complete list of unsafe ingredients and foods. It is also impo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a digestive disorder that appears to be more common in people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Celiac disease is found in 4 to 9% of children with type 1 diabetes but, in 60 to 70% of these children, the disease is asymptomatic (‘silent’ celiac disease). Children with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for celiac disease during the first 10 years of diabetes. What is celiac disease? Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition in which the body cannot tolerate gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and triticale. It is the gluten in the flour that helps bread and other baked goods bind and prevents crumbling. This feature has made gluten widely used in the production of many processed and packaged foods. If you have celiac disease and eat food with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small intestine and preventing the body from properly absorbing nutrients in your food, including protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Celiac disease is an inherited condition. First degree relatives (parents, brothers, sisters and children) of people with celiac disease are at the highest risk of having unrecognized celiac disease (5-15%). It can appear at any time in the life of a person with a hereditary predisposition to it. Environmental factors such as emotional stress, pregnancy, surgery, or an infection (e.g., travellers’ diarrhea, pneumonia) can sometimes trigger the onset of symptoms. For more information, please visit the Canadian Celiac Association. What are the symptoms of celiac disease? Many people with celiac disease don’t have any symptoms at all, which is why the disease is often undiagnosed. In people who do experience symptoms, they can vary from obvious digestive problems such as seve Continue reading >>

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