diabetestalk.net

Garlic And Insulin Interaction

Pharmacodynamic Interaction Of Garlic With Gliclazide And Ramipril On Myocardial Injury In Diabetic Rats

Pharmacodynamic Interaction Of Garlic With Gliclazide And Ramipril On Myocardial Injury In Diabetic Rats

Pharmacodynamic Interaction of Garlic with Gliclazide and Ramipril on Myocardial Injury in Diabetic Rats Concurrent therapy of herbs with conventional regimen has been extensively reported for alleviating morbidities such as diabetes and cardiac manifestations. One of unique natural remedy that carry abundant potential for ameliorating wide varieties of ailment is garlic. Present research was designed to explore the role of garlic in obviating myocardial dysfunction in diabetic animals, when combined with ramipril and/or gliclazide. Diabetic Sprague Dawley rats received garlic (250 mg kg-1), ramipril (1 mg kg-1) and gliclazide (10 mg kg-1) orally either alone or in combination in their respective groups. At the end of treatment, heart was excised; mounted on modified Langendorffs set-up; perfused with KrebsHenseleit solution and subjected to ischemia reperfusion injury. Significantly increased percentage recovery was recorded in heart rate and developed tension during post-ischemia in all treated animals, when compared to diabetic group. Further, depleted Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities were substantially inclined in treated groups. Furthermore, combination of garlic with ramipril was most effective in reverting the ischemic damage, whereas, garlic with gliclazide prevent beta cell degeneration. Moreover, histopathological observations validated biochemical and hemodynamic findings. To conclude, this preliminary observation in animals reveals the beneficial role of adding garlic to conventional regimen of gliclazide and ramipril. Further, a careful clinical evaluation of above combination would provide us an opportunity to standardize and implement in cardiovascular disease management in diabetic patient. Received: April 15, 2015; Accepted: May 27, 2 Continue reading >>

Does Garlic Have A Role As An Antidiabetic Agent?

Does Garlic Have A Role As An Antidiabetic Agent?

Does garlic have a role as an antidiabetic agent? Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, PR China. [email protected] Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Nov;51(11):1353-64. Diabetes affects a large segment of the population worldwide, and the prevalence of this disease is rapidly increasing. Despite the availability of medication for diabetes, traditional remedies are desirable and are currently being investigated. Garlic (Allium sativum), which is a common cooking spice and has a long history as a folk remedy, has been reported to have antidiabetic activity. However, there is no general agreement on the use of garlic for antidiabetic purposes, primarily because of a lack of scientific evidence from human studies and inconsistent data from animal studies. The validity of data from previous studies of the hypoglycemic effect of garlic in diabetic animals and the preventive effects of garlic on diabetes complications are discussed in this review. The role of garlic as both an insulin secretagogue and as an insulin sensitizer is reviewed. Evidence suggests that garlic's antioxidative, antiinflammatory, and antiglycative properties are responsible for garlic's role in preventing diabetes progression and the development of diabetes-related complications. Large-scale clinical studies with diabetic patients are warranted to confirm the usefulness of garlic in the treatment and prevention of diabetes. Continue reading >>

(garlic) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

(garlic) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

The use of garlic in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous. Garlic is also known as rocambole, ajo, allium, stinking rose, rustic treacle, nectar of the gods, camphor of the poor, poor man's treacle, and clove garlic. Garlic is a commonly used flavoring agent and food product. Garlic is also available as an herbal supplement. The information contained in this leaflet refers to the use of garlic as an herbal supplement. When used as a food product, the benefits and potential side effects of garlic may be less pronounced than when it is used as an herbal supplement. Garlic has been used orally as an antioxidant; to reduce cholesterol and triglycerides ; to reduce hardening of the arteries and blood clotting; to reduce blood pressure; to prevent cancer; to protect the liver; as an antibiotic, antiviral, and antifungal; to increase the effects of the immune system; to reduce blood sugar levels; and to reduce menstrual pain. Garlic has also been used topically (on the skin) to treat corns, warts , calluses, ear infections, muscle pain, nerve pain, arthritis , and sciatica . Garlic has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/or advantages of garlic may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds. There have been instances where herbal/health supplements have been sold which were contaminated Continue reading >>

Garlic Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

Garlic Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

Aged Garlic Extract, Ail, Ail Blanc, Ail Cultive, Ail Rocambole, Ajo, Alho, Allii Sativi Bulbus, Allium, Allium sativum, Angio D'India, Camphor Of The Poor, Clove Garlic, Common Garlic, Da Suan, Echte Rokkenbolle, Echter Knoblauch, Garlic Clove, Garlic Oil, Knoblauch, Lasun, Lasuna, Maneul, Nectar Of The Gods, Ninniku, Ophio Garlic, Poor Man's Treacle, Rason, Rocambole, Rockenbolle, Rust Treacle, Schlangenknoblauch, Serpent Garlic, Spanish Garlic, Stinking Rose, Suan, Thoum, Vitlok. Garlic is an herb that is grown around the world. It is related to onion, leeks, and chives. It is thought that garlic is native to Siberia, but spread to other parts of the world over 5000 years ago. Garlic is used for many conditions related to the heart and blood system. These conditions include high blood pressure , low blood pressure, high cholesterol, inherited high cholesterol, coronary heart disease, heart attack, reduced blood flow due to narrowed arteries, and "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis). Some people use garlic to prevent colon cancer, rectal cancer, stomach cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer. It is also used to treat prostate cancer and bladder cancer. Garlic has been tried for treating an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia; BPH), cystic fibrosis, diabetes, osteoarthritis, hayfever (allergic rhinitis), traveler's diarrhea, high blood pressure late in pregnancy (pre-eclampsia), yeast infection, flu, and swine flu. It is also used to prevent tick bites, as a mosquito repellant, and for preventing the common cold, and treating and preventing bacterial and fungal infections. Garlic is also used for earaches, chronic fatigue syndrome, menstrual disorders, abnormal cholesterol levels caused by HIV drugs, hepatitis, s Continue reading >>

Garlic And Insulin Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Garlic And Insulin Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Garlic and Insulin drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Garlic and Insulin together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Garlic and Insulin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 11 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 11 people who take Garlic, Insulin are studied. Most common drug interactions by gender *: Nocturia (the need to get up in the night to urinate) Acute pre-renal failure (prerenal acute renal failure (arf) occurs when a sudden reduction in blood flow to the kidney) Bartholin's cyst (cyst is formed on one or both of the two bartholin's glands, which are located one on either side of the opening of the vagina) Gynaecomastia (enlargement of the gland tissue of the male breast) Haematuria present (presence of blood in urine due to trauma) * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Want to find out more about the FDA reports used in the study? You can request them from FDA. Garlic has active ingredients of allium sativum. It is often used in high blood cholesterol. ( latest outcomes from Garlic 1,488 users ) Insulin has active ingredients of insulin pork. It is often used in diabetes. ( latest outcomes from Insulin 22,780 users ) Interactions between Garlic and drugs from A to Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m Continue reading >>

Garlic | Health24

Garlic | Health24

The active ingredients in garlic include allin and allicin. Allin gives garlic its characteristic taste and the sulphate, allicin, gives garlic its infamous odour. Allicin is responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effects of garlic. Preliminary studies have found that garlic may help prevent cancer as it stimulates the immune system and disturbs the growth of malignant cells. It has been proposed that garlic can be used as an adjunctive treatment to boost the immune system of cancer patients and that it can also prevent side effects from chemo- and radiotherapy. Preliminary research shows that garlic may help treat chest infections. Taken with conventional antibiotics, it's believed that garlic supports their healing action and prevents unwanted side-effects. By thinning the blood, garlic may help reduce the risk of circulatory problems, strokes, thromboses and heart disease, although this has not been conclusively proven. It also seems that garlic may help to dilate peripheral blood vessels, which, in turn, lowers blood pressure. Animal studies have shown that garlic may help regulate blood sugar levels and may therefore help with late-onset diabetes. However, sudies in humans are needed to confirm these possible benefits. Garlic may also be used to treat digestive infections, such as gastroenteritis and dysentery. The herb may also help to eliminate intestinal parasites, although this hasn't been conclusively proven. Some studies have shown that rubbing fresh cloves directly onto the skin may help to treat acne and minor bacterial and fungal infections. But take care: garlic may cause a rash in some people. Have 3-4g of freshly crushed garlic a day (this amounts to roughly one large clove) to lower cholesterol. Pearls are supplements that contain garlic oil and can Continue reading >>

About Insulin

About Insulin

What Is Insulin? The human body requires energy to function. We receive energy from the foods we eat in the form of protein, fat and carbohydrates, or "carbs." The food we eat is typically converted to sugars. In order for sugar to enter the cell and provide energy, it must bind to a hormone called insulin (IN-su-lin). Insulin is like a key that "unlocks the door" to enter the cell. If we did not have insulin in our bodies, the sugar could not "unlock the door" to enter the cell. The blood sugar levels would then become very high. When there is not enough insulin to unlock the cell, the sugar stays in the blood and cannot be used to make energy. If we did not have insulin in our bodies, our blood sugar levels would also become too high. If this happens consistently, it will lead to serious health problems, including heart disease and damage to the nerves, eyes and kidney. Insulin is produced and secreted by the pancreas. Some people with diabetes have a condition where the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet its needs or the body does not properly use the insulin it makes. In this case, a special diet and regular exercise is required to control the blood sugars. If diet and exercise is not enough to control the blood sugars, and if the pancreas is not making insulin as it is supposed to, then insulin from outside the body (external insulin) may be required. Many people with diabetes depend on (external) insulin injections to control their blood sugar. Are there any types of drugs that can interact with or affect insulin? Although insulin does not actually “interact” with any drugs, there are numerous drugs that can have an impact on someone who uses insulin. For instance, certain medications can have an effect on your blood sugar and may contribute to an i Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

Being asleep. Being awake. Hot weather. Cold weather. Seems there’s no end to the number of things that can raise your blood glucose levels. No wonder diabetes management can be such an obstacle course. But it’s not all doom and gloom. For every factor that unexpectedly sends your blood sugars spiralling out of control, there’s an equally unexpected – and often enjoyable – way to keep them under control. 1. Peanut butter We know that peanuts are great for people with diabetes. But one group of researchers from Brazil were more interested in peanut butter (and why wouldn’t they be). The team split participants into three groups: the first ate 1.5 ounces of peanuts; the second had three tablespoons of peanut butter with breakfast; and the third had no peanut butter or peanuts. They all ate the same lunch of white bread and strawberry jam. Interestingly, the researchers found that the peanut butter was better for blood glucose levels than the peanuts. The second group felt fuller for long, and had lower blood sugars when they were tested after lunch. Not all peanut butter is as good for you, of course. But the researchers found that the healthier brands can do you a lot of good. Turns out that peanut butter has a lovely combination of high protein, fibre and healthy oils. So you no longer have to feel ashamed for eating it straight from the jar with a tablespoon. I certainly won’t. 2. Red wine Red wine lowers blood sugars by stopping the intestines absorbing glucose. Recently, plenty of researchers have become very interested in the effects of red wine on weight loss and blood glucose levels. A number of studies reckon it could be beneficial. That said, drinking too much of it can cause problems (such as a build-up of fat around the liver), so everything in m Continue reading >>

Warning: Supplements And Medications May Not Mix

Warning: Supplements And Medications May Not Mix

Americans are taking more prescription medications. They also are taking more supplements — everything from vitamin and mineral pills to fish and flax seed oils. The natural result: More are combining drugs and supplements. That may be riskier than many consumers realize. Some are risking dangerous internal bleeding by combining certain supplements with blood-thinning drugs. Others are unknowingly reducing the effectiveness of medications they take to fight cancer, control infections or prevent pregnancy. “It’s a serious concern, and the risk is growing,” says Dima Qato, an assistant professor of pharmacy at the University of Illinois in Chicago. Qato led a recent study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, documenting increased mixing of all sorts of medications and supplements among U.S. adults ages 62 to 85. The study found that 87% used at least one prescription medication, 38% took at least one non-prescription drug, and 64% used at least one supplement. Many took multiple drugs and supplements. The researchers looked for combinations known to the be dangerous and found that the most common involving a supplement was a mix of blood-thinning medication warfarin and supplements of omega-3 fish oils. The combination, which increases bleeding risks, was taken by 8 in 1,000 older adults in 2010-2011, up from 1 in 1,000 in 2005-2006. The researchers also found about 4 in 1,000 combining niacin supplements with the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin, which can increase side effects. In a statement, Andrea Wong, vice president of scientific and regulatory affairs at the Council for Responsible Nutrition, which represents supplement makers, said the results “show that the prevalence of older adults taking a combination of drugs and supplements with a potential Continue reading >>

Taking Herbs With My Diabetes Medication Is It Safe | Diabetic Connect

Taking Herbs With My Diabetes Medication Is It Safe | Diabetic Connect

Taking Herbs With My Diabetes Medication: Is It Safe? Taking Herbs with My Diabetes Medication: Is it Safe? Some supplements could change the way common diabetes medicines such as glibenclamide work. Over 345 million people worldwide have diabetes , with more than 80 percent of diabetes deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that diabetes deaths would double between the years 2005 and 2030. As the number of people with diabetes increases, so does the number of those who try alternative means to manage the disease, including the use of herbs. In a 2002 WHO report, the organization found that 80 percent of the world's population uses traditional medicine. Often, people combine herbal remedies with oral hypoglycemic medications. However, research suggests that natural does not always mean safe. Dietary Supplements and Drug Interactions Herbs, vitamins and other dietary supplements may augment or antagonize the actions of prescription and nonprescription drugs. Dietary supplements can include vitamins, minerals, herbs, or other botanicals, an amino acid, or other such substances. These supplements have demonstrated pharmacologic action used to produce therapeutic results. Even supplements that do not have a documented pharmacologic action can affect the absorption, metabolism and disposition of other drugs. When taken orally, they travel through the digestive system in the same way as food or herbs would. If supplements are mixed with prescription or nonprescription drugs, each can alter the other's pharmacologic action. A type of medicine called a sulphonylurea, glibenclamide helps control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. It is one of two oral antidiabetics in the World Health Organization Mode Continue reading >>

Possible Interactions Between Garlic And Conventional Drugs: A Review | Kansara | Pharmaceutical And Biological Evaluations

Possible Interactions Between Garlic And Conventional Drugs: A Review | Kansara | Pharmaceutical And Biological Evaluations

Possible interactions between garlic and conventional drugs: a review 1Sardar Patel College of Pharmacy, Bakrol, Gujarat, India 2Accutest Research Laboratories (I) Pvt. Ltd, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Sardar Patel College of Pharmacy, Bakrol, Gujarat, India. Email: [email protected] gmail.com Received: 01 March 2017 Revised: 22 March 2017 Accepted: 23 March 2017 Herbs can affect body function; therefore, when herbs are taken concurrently with drugs, interactions are possible. The interaction between drugs and herbal medicines is a safe concern and these interactions are especially important for drugs with narrow therapeutics index. The probability of herb-drug interaction can be higher than drug interaction, if conventional drug having single chemical entities, whereas most of the herbal medicinal product contain a mixture of pharmacologically active constituents. The herb-drug interaction may involve either an increase or decrease in the amount of drug in blood, either by altering the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of drug and by antagonizing or synergism of the effect of drug or pharmacodynamics interaction may arise. This article we focus on how garlic interacts with conventional drug or it is favourable or not. Keywords: Herbal-drug interaction, Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamics, Garlic, Interaction with the conventional drug Herbs or herbal drugs are generally defined as a form of a plant it including leaves, flowers, stems, roots, shoots and seeds. It consists of a single constituent or multiple constituents also. Complimentary effect of herbs was being seen by on the bases of amount as well as number of active constituents present in herb or herbal dug.1,2 From the ancient time herbs were being used for medicinal purposed. It can affec Continue reading >>

Garlic Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar, Total Cholesterol And Triglycerides

Garlic Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar, Total Cholesterol And Triglycerides

Eating raw garlic lowers fasting blood sugar, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperglycemic and/or hyperlipidemic people in two separate studies. Picture: Two Romanian Red garlic bulbs rest on red cloth. Garlic Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar in People with High Cholesterol In the first study, Mahmoodi et al. (2011) looked at the effect of eating raw garlic on three groups of people. Volunteers ate 10 grams of garlic daily (one small/medium clove) for 42 days. Group 1: People who had high fasting blood sugar (over 126 mg/dl) Group 2: People who had high blood cholesterol (over 245 ml/dl) Group 3: People who had high blood cholesterol (over 245 ml/dl)and high fasting blood glucose levels (over 126 mg/dl) Eating garlic had no effect on group 1; however, it had a significant effect on groups 2 and 3. Group 2: had significant decreases in fasting blood sugar, triglycerides and total cholesterol. At the same time good HDL cholesterol increased. Group 3: had significant decreases in fasting blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin and total cholesterol. Again good HDL cholesterol increased. Garlic Increases Effectiveness of Metformin In the second study, Ashraf et al. (2011) gave type 2 diabetic patients (n=60) with fasting blood sugar over 126 mg/dl either garlic (300 mg KWAI) + Metformin (500 mg) or a placebo + Metformin (500 mg) twice a day for 24 weeks. Metformin is a standard antidiabetic drug commonly prescribed to type 2 diabetic patients. The garlic plus Metformin group showed a significant reduction in fasting blood sugar at week 24 (-3.12%) (P = <0.005) as compared to group 2 (0.59%). At the end of week 24, the garlic + Metformin group also showed a considerable decrease in mean total cholesterol (6.2 mg/dl, -2.82%, P=<0.005), LDL-C (-3 mg/dl, 2.18% P=<0.005), triglycerides Continue reading >>

Garlic Drug Interactions

Garlic Drug Interactions

A total of 312 drugs (1041 brand and generic names) are known to interact with garlic . 14 major drug interactions (31 brand and generic names) 77 moderate drug interactions (315 brand and generic names) 221 minor drug interactions (695 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with garlic. Type in a drug name and select a drug from the list. The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables. Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any gi Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Garlic If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Garlic If You Have Diabetes?

People who have diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or use the insulin their body does produce in an efficient manner. This can affect your blood sugar levels. It’s important to monitor what you eat to keep your blood sugar levels as steady as possible. One way to do this is by checking the glycemic index (GI) score of each food. The GI shows how much a certain food can increase your blood sugar levels. GI helps with the planning of daily meals and avoiding high-carbohydrate combinations. A low GI is between 1 and 55 and high is 70 and above. It’s important to know that natural foods, such as garlic, though not rich in carbohydrates, can influence blood sugar levels. Most adults can safely consume garlic. For some people, taste, odor, or spiciness can be an issue. Traditionally, garlic has been recommended to help reduce high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. Garlic consumption may also reduce the incidence of heart disease, a condition that affects approximately 80 percent of people with diabetes. A 2006 study found that raw garlic might help reduce blood sugar levels, as well as reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. This is particular interest, as diabetes increases a person’s risk of atherosclerosis-related inflammation. Though this is still under investigation, a 2014 review of studies also supported the idea that regular garlic consumption may help lower blood sugar levels. Garlic is also a good source of vitamins B-6 and C. Vitamin B-6 is involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Vitamin C may also play a role in maintaining blood sugar levels. In general, garlic has been shown to: improve the health of the cardiovascular system by reducing the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood lipids decrease blood pressure have an anti-tumor effe Continue reading >>

Interactions Between: Garlic, Insulin Injection

Interactions Between: Garlic, Insulin Injection

Known interactions between the following drugs: Garlic , Insulin injection 1 interaction was found for the drugs you selected. Garlic in Garlic may interact with INSULIN in Insulin injection Taking garlic may have a slight blood sugar-lowering effect. The amounts of garlic ordinarily consumed in foods are not thought to affect blood sugar very much. However, if large amounts of supplemental garlic are taken at the same time that insulin is being used, hypoglycemia (blood sugar that is too low) may result. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include shakiness, sweating, confusion, distorted speech, and loss of muscle control. If not corrected, low blood sugar can lead to unconsciousness and even death. Therefore, supplemental garlic should not be used at the same time as insulin. If you use insulin, you should inform your doctor before taking any herbal supplement. Discuss this potential interaction with your healthcare provider at your next appointment, or sooner if you think you are having problems. This interaction is poorly documented and is considered moderate in severity. (Note: Not all drug interactions are known or reported in the literature, and new drug interactions are continually being reported. This information is provided only for your education and for you to discuss with your personal healthcare provider.) Continue reading >>

More in diabetes