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Gallbladder Removal Diabetes Risk

Is Gallbladder Removal Worth The Risk In Seniors?

Is Gallbladder Removal Worth The Risk In Seniors?

Is Gallbladder Removal Worth the Risk in Seniors? A study from the University of Texas Medical Branch reveals that many patients with gallbladder disease do not benefit from surgery. The study entitled The Risk Paradox: Use of Elective Cholecystectomy in Older Patients Is Independent of Their Risk of Developing Complications , published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons was presented at the Southern Surgical Association 126th Annual Meeting that took place in Palm Beach, FL on November 30December 3, 2014. Gallbladder diseaseaffects the small organ on the underside of the liver. Its main function is to store the bile produced in the liver, and secrete it into thesmall intestine. Gallstones may develop in the gallbladder or alongthe biliary tract when the bile contains too much cholesterol, thus making obesity secondary to a bad diet a risk factor for the development of gallbladder problems. The prevalence of gallstones increases with age, from 8% of people under 40 years, to up to 50% in people 70 years and older. Gallbladder disease is one of the common causes of acute abdominal pain in older patients, and accounts for a third of abdominal procedures in patients older than 65 years. In patients with symptomatic gallstones, it is recommended they undergo elective cholecystectomy to prevent gallstone-related complications . However, this procedure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in older patients. Still, without the procedure, older people have an increased risk of severe complications from their gallstones, such as acute cholecystitis with gangrenous cholecystitis, empyema of the gallbladder, gallbladder perforation, or emphysematous cholecystitis. These complications require urgent hospitalization and/or cholecystectomy, thus incre Continue reading >>

Risk Associated With Diabetes Mellitus In Patients Undergoing Gallbladder Surgery.

Risk Associated With Diabetes Mellitus In Patients Undergoing Gallbladder Surgery.

Abstract Diabetes mellitus has been suggested as a risk factor in patients undergoing gallbladder surgery. To assess the validity of this observation, a study of 175 diabetic and nondiabetic patients who underwent cholecystectomy of cholecystostomy was undertaken. Eighty patients (40%) were diabetic, and 95 (54%) were nondiabetic. The rates of death and complications were nearly identical in both diabetic and nondiabetic populations. In this selected population renal disease and vascular occlusive disease (with or without diabetes mellitus) resulted in a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in morbidity and mortality rates. Therefore, we conclude that diabetes mellitus alone does not appear to adversely affect the prognosis of patients who require gallbladder surgery. Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones and gallstones both occur more frequently in people with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which causes insulin resistance. Kidney Stones and Type 2 Diabetes Kidney stones or nephrolithiasis are small pebble-like pieces of material that form in one or both of your kidneys from minerals in the urine. While most kidney stones exit the body without the help of a doctor, some stones get caught in the urinary tract where they can block the flow of urine and cause great pain. Kidney stones come in several types. The most common are uric acid stones, calcium oxalate stones, and infectious stones. People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome are particularly susceptible to developing uric acid kidney stones. Causes & Symptoms One reason why people with diabetes have a higher chance of having a kidney stone is that they often have highly-acidic urine, which puts them at risk for developing uric acid stones. Behind this acidic urine is poorly controlled diabetes. “When the body doesn’t have enough sugar for metabolism because either it isn’t producing insulin or not responding to insulin it’s forced to metabolize fat and that can make your urine acidotic,” says Phillip Mucksavage, MD, director of endourology and stone disease at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. “This condition, called ketoacidosis, can change levels of the pH in urine.” Diabetes patients also have more calcium oxalate stones than the general population. Once again, uncontrolled diabetes is the culprit. “Uncontrolled diabetes can cause dehydration which is a prime risk factor for calcium oxalate stones,” says Dr. Mucksavage. Other diseases such as high blood pressure and obesity may also increase the risk of developing kidney stones. About 10% of people with kidney stones never k Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Removal - Nhs.uk

Gallbladder Removal - Nhs.uk

Gallbladder removal surgery, also known as acholecystectomy, is a very common procedure. The gallbladder is a small, pouch-like organ in the upper right part of your tummy. It stores bile,a fluid produced by the liver that helps break down fatty foods. You don't need a gallbladder, so surgery to take it out is often recommended if you develop any problems with it. Why does my gallbladder need to be removed? Surgery to remove the gallbladder is usuallycarried out if you have painful gallstones . These are small stones that can form in the gallbladder as a result of an imbalance in the substances that make up bile. Gallstones often cause no symptoms and you may not realise you have them, but occasionally they can block the flow of bileand irritate the gallbladder ( acutecholecystitis ) or pancreas ( acute pancreatitis ). yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes ( jaundice ) Very occasionallyit may be possible to take tablets to dissolve gallstones, but surgery to remove the gallbladder is the most effective treatment in the vast majority of cases. What happens during gallbladder removal surgery There are two main ways of removing a gallbladder: laparoscopic (keyhole) cholecystectomyseveral small cuts (incisions) are made in your tummy (abdomen) and fine surgical instruments are used to access and remove your gallbladder open cholecystectomy a single, larger incision is made in your tummy to access and remove your gallbladder Keyhole surgery is used most often because you can leave hospital sooner, recover faster and are left with smaller scars than with an open procedure. Both techniques are performed under general anaesthetic , which means you'll be asleep during the operation and won't feel any pain while it's carried out. Recovering from gallbladder removal su Continue reading >>

Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal January 30, 2018 by Stan Pak in Treatment Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal If you are a diabetic patient who has had their gallbladder removed, you will find that the post-cholecystectomy recommended diet and diabetic diet are quite similar and complimentary. Gallstones and cholecystitis, (inflamed gallbladder) are very common problems for people with diabetes. This is because diabetes and obesity are known risk factors for gallbladder disease . The low-fat diet which is typically prescribed for diabetic patients suffering from gallstones will also be the best to maintain after surgery. What Is The Gallbladder And What Does It Do? The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped pouch which stores and concentrates the bile created by the liver. The food we eat and the fat content within it triggers release of specific amounts of bile from the gallbladder, into the small intestine for efficient breakdown and absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins. After gallbladder removal surgery, the liver will continue to produce bile however it will continually enter the intestine in a thin trickle and digestion of high fat meals or fried food becomes problematic, leading to pain, bloating, gas, nausea and diarrhea in many cases. What Diet To Use After Gallbladder Surgery Many patients whether diabetic or not will be much more comfortable sticking with this diabetic diet post procedure. Healthy fats only in very small quantities will be more easily digested with fewer symptoms. Choose Coconut oil which is MOSTLY made up of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) and causes the least amount of trouble as it does not require bile to emulsify it. Choose olive oil instead of butter and consider having fish in leu of red meat Continue reading >>

Management Of Gallstones In Diabetic Patients

Management Of Gallstones In Diabetic Patients

The management of gallstones in diabetic patients has traditionally been considered problematic. Autopsy findings and uncontrolled studies have documented a higher prevalence of cholelithiasis in diabetics, and early reports showed dramatically increased perioperative morbidity and mortality for treatment of diabetics with acute cholecystitis. As a result, some authorities have recommended prophylactic cholecystectomy for diabetic patients with asymptomatic gallstones, which is in contrast to recommendations for nondiabetics. More recent investigators have shown comparable rates of operative morbidity and mortality for biliary surgery in diabetics when compared with the general population. Recent studies have questioned whether diabetes is an independent risk factor for gallstone formation. Decision analyses using these new data have shown that prophylactic cholecystectomy is not of clear benefit and should not be routinely recommended for diabetics with asymptomatic gallstones. We believe that available data, although limited, indicate that asymptomatic patients with diabetes do not benefit from screening for gall-stones and that cholecystectomy should only be performed in cases of symptomatic cholelithiasis, as is the case in the general population. (Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1053-1058) Continue reading >>

​for Your Gallbladder’s Sake, Control Diabetes!

​for Your Gallbladder’s Sake, Control Diabetes!

A Basic Guide to Diabetes, it’s Relationship with the Gallbladder, and Natural Ways to Control Diabetes the Gallbladder-friendly Way There is nothing sweet about diabetes; in fact, some refer to it as a “silent killer”. Not only can this pandemic make a patient suffer and deteriorate slowly, it can also drain the whole family of financial resources due to health care costs that may have to be borne for a long period of time. Diabetes also has a long list of related disorders and complications, so once you have it, you can never be too complacent that everything is under control. For example, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and amputation in the United States. The risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is much higher for diabetics. It also impacts numerous bodily systems –nervous, digestive, urinary, and the biliary system which includes the gallbladder. According to 2015 statistics, there are about 30.3 million Americans suffering from the disease. This makes diabetes the 7th leading cause of death in the country. Diabetes, commonly referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a metabolism disorder which affects the way our body maintains and manages glucose or sugar. This compound serves as our principal source of “fuel”. A hormone called insulin is crucial for the conversion of glucose into energy. Sadly in diabetics, insulin production is either absent or inadequate. It is also possible that the body’s cells are no longer responding properly to the hormone. Therefore, glucose remains in the blood instead of being used up as energy, thus the high blood sugar levels. There are three major types of diabetes – type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. The first type is also called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 do not have the Continue reading >>

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Can Gallbladder Removal Cause Diabetes

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Can Gallbladder Removal Cause Diabetes

3 Bile salts: After gb removal, bile is still produced by the liver and still flows into the intestine but instead of having a gallbladder full of bile empty every time you eat there is instead a constant trickle of bile into the intestines which can play havoc on your digestion. Still, every person is different. See this excellent article: Mayoclinic ...Read more 4 Depends on level: Some minor elevation of bilirubin can occur from swelling of the bile duct but should be very short lived. Marked elevation or prolonged elevation (assuming normal levels pre-operatively) should be evaluated promptly, with ultrasound and in some cases, x-rays of the bile duct (also called ERCP or mrcp). Any other associated symptom, like abdo ...Read more 8 10 Many possibilities: Surgery was about 9 months ago? Adhesions from laparoscopic gallbladder surgery are quite rare. Pain that long after surgery may not be related to the past surgery. Would need to return to your family doctor for evaluation, blood tests, maybe ultrasound or ct scan. Depends on where the pain is, when does it happen, etc? Gastiris, stomach ...Read more 12 15 17 18 20 21 24 26 27 29 Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Removal Risks

Gallbladder Removal Risks

Surgeons perform gallbladder removal using a procedure called a cholecystectomy. It is commonly used to treat those experiencing severe pain or other complications resulting from gallstones or inflammation. Both open and minimally-invasive laparoscopic cholecystectomies are generally safe, resulting in an overall complication rate of around 2 percent, according to the University of Southern California Department of Surgery. Nonetheless, there are potentially serious risks associated with gallbladder removal. Video of the Day Patients who undergo gallbladder removal surgery are at risk of suffering internal bleeding during or after surgery. According to MedlinePlus, patients may also develop an infection in the abdominal region as a result of bacterial contamination during surgery. The patient’s overall health, surgical history and medication and supplement use can influence these risks, according to MayoClinic.com. For example, those with pre-existing conditions such as diabetes are at higher risk of post-surgical infection, and patients who take blood-thinning medications or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are at increased risk of bleeding. Injury to Internal Organs and Structures During a cholecystectomy, the surgeon may inadvertently injure nearby organs or structures. For example, injury to the bile duct or perforation of the small intestine can occur, according to the University of Southern California Department of Surgery. Damage to the liver, gallbladder or bile duct can cause bile to leak into the abdomen, resulting in severe abdominal pain that requires prompt medical treatment. Patients with gallstones are also at risk of the stones falling out of the gallbladder and into the abdomen if the surgeon--intentionally or unintentionally--opens up the g Continue reading >>

Does Gallbladder Removal Cause Diabetes

Does Gallbladder Removal Cause Diabetes

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does Gallbladder removal cause diabetes ? Does anyone have found that they got T2 after removing gallbladder ? I did but I do not believe this was a catalyst to diabetes. Mine was removed a few years after Dx. I suspect diet change right after Dx brought it on as next was Fatty liver disease / NAFLD. Heavy Insulin resistance (via liver??) since the beginning. BTW -crash diets are known to cause fatty liver in 1/3 and fatty liver leads to diabetes. No I don't think it does. I still have my gall bladder and no problems with it. On the other hand maybe they are related in some ways but then your whole body it effected by diabetes so who knows. It might be the other way around. I also had mine removed about 2 years after diagnosis. i've never heard that. I had my gallbladder removed in 1999. So far diabetes free. The only problem i have is i can't eat foods that are overly greasy. Leads to IBS in a subset of patients, but not diabetes as far as I know. Had mine out about 18 years before D Dx. IBS ever since. Had mine out about 15 years prior to diagnosis. but, I know a ton of people who have had theirs out and don't have diabetes. And I know diabetics who have the gallbladders. I don't believe removing my gallbladder lead to my diabetes. It is possible the 5 years of off and on pancreatitis may have sped that up a bit though. I got my gallbladder removed about 3 years back. Thought that there might be a connection. All of your messages indicate otherwise. Even if there is a connection, what can I do ? :-) Was just curious. Have a great weekend! My friend had gall bladder and she removed it after Continue reading >>

Cholecystectomy As A Risk Factor Of Metabolic Syndrome: From Epidemiologic Clues To Biochemical Mechanisms

Cholecystectomy As A Risk Factor Of Metabolic Syndrome: From Epidemiologic Clues To Biochemical Mechanisms

Cholecystectomy as a risk factor of metabolic syndrome: from epidemiologic clues to biochemical mechanisms Laboratory Investigation volume 98, pages 714 (2018) Cholecystectomy has long been regarded as a safe procedure with no deleterious influence on the body. However, recent studies provide clues that link cholecystectomy to a high risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS). In the present review, we describe the epidemiologic evidence that links cholecystectomy to MetS. Various components of MetS are investigated, including visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, and insulin resistance. The possible mechanisms that associate cholecystectomy with MetS are discussed on the basis of experimental studies. Gallstone disease is one of the most common biliary tract diseases in which both environmental and genetic factors have roles in its pathogenesis. Biliary cholesterol supersaturation from metabolic defects in the liver and the subsequent physicalchemical imbalance of cholesterol solubility in bile are thought to be the main cause of gallstone formation. 1 Factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, and overnutrition increase the risk of developing gallstones and form the basis of primary prevention by lifestyle changes. 2 Although treatment of asymptomatic gallstone patients is not routinely recommended, current treatment algorithms for symptomatic gallstone patients, by contrast, remain predominantly invasive and are based on surgery. 3 Cholecystectomy is the best and most cost-effective treatment for gallstone disease, and one of the most commonly performed operations worldwide. The short- and long-term outcomes of cholecystectomy are excellent, and the surgical procedure has minimal rates of mortality and morbidity. It is also ac Continue reading >>

Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Cholecystectomy Rate: A Population-based Follow-up Study - Sciencedirect

Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Cholecystectomy Rate: A Population-based Follow-up Study - Sciencedirect

Impact of diabetes mellitus on cholecystectomy rate: A population-based follow-up study Author links open overlay panel Chi-MingLiu Some reports suggest early cholecystectomy for diabetic patients with asymptomatic gallstone disease (GSD) to prevent subsequent serious infection. However, only a few studies have examined the incidence of cholecystectomy in response to GSD in diabetic patients. Our study attempts to elucidate the relationship between GSD and diabetes using the high coverage rate health insurance system of Taiwan and thus evaluate the validity of early cholecystectomy in diabetic patients. To investigate the rate of cholecystectomy in diabetic patients with GSD. Diabetic patients without prior treatment for GSD on hospitalization or ambulatory visits were identified and compared with age- and sex-matched controls and were followed up for 8 years. Cholecystectomy incidence density rates were estimated according to the patients' diabetic status. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the age- and sex-specific effects of diabetes on the risk of surgery for GSD. The incidence rates of patients who developed GSD and underwent cholecystectomy were 18.65% and 17.15% in the diabetic and control groups, respectively; thus, the rate of cholecystectomy was higher in the diabetic group than in the control group. Male sex and old age were associated with a high rate of cholecystectomy, irrespective of the diabetic status. Hypertension, cholangitis, and Caroli disease were associated with an increased risk of cholecystectomy in patients with GSD. Overall, diabetic patients exhibited a higher incidence of cholecystectomy than nondiabetic patients did over an 8-year follow-up period. Men with GSD are more likely to undergo cholecystectomy than wo Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Problems And Diabetes

Gallbladder Problems And Diabetes

For reasons that aren’t fully understood, people with diabetes have more gallstone problems than people in the general population. Diabetes and Gallbladder Problems: What’s the Connection? The evidence that people with diabetes are at greater risk of gallstones is clear, but “we still don’t know why,” says Armand A. Krikorian, MD, an endocrinologist at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. Perhaps it’s because people with diabetes are generally overweight, and obesity is linked to gallstone disease. People with diabetes have higher levels of triglycerides — a type of fat — and it’s theorized that the triglycerides themselves encourage gallstone formation. Another theory is that stones form because of what is called autonomic neuropathy, or damage from diabetes to the involuntary nerves that control movement of the bowels and gallbladder. According to this line of thought, the bile stored in the gallbladder is not released efficiently because the nerves are damaged, and gallstones form from the resulting sludge. Also, recent research on insulin-resistant mice shows that FOXO1, a specific protein involved with diabetes, increases the amount of cholesterol that enters the bile, which may lead to the formation of gallstones. Cholesterol is a major component of most gallstones. Diabetes and Gallbladder Problems: Know the Symptoms Dr. Krikorian says that for a person living with diabetes, controlling the diabetes is the way to head off gallbladder problems. When diabetes is under control, it's much less likely that autonomic neuropathy will become an issue, and your triglyceride levels will be lower — thus decreasing your odds of developing gallsto Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetic Patients For Gallstones

Treating Diabetic Patients For Gallstones

TREATING DIABETIC PATIENTS FOR GALLSTONES TREATING DIABETIC PATIENTS FOR GALLSTONES Should most asymptomatic gallstones in otherwise healthy diabetic patients be treated with elective cholecystectomy? Robert E. Hollis Jr, MD, Fort Mitchell, Ky. Gallstones are more common in diabetic patients than in others, and there is some largely anecdotal evidence that diabetics are at increased risk for developing severe gangrenous cholecystitis. This information led some authorities in the 1980s to recommend prophylactic cholecystectomy for asymptomatic patients. However, the risk of gangrenous cholecystitis is small and probably doesnt outweigh the risks and costs associated with surgery. One study, for example, showed that of 47 diabetic patients found to have asymptomatic gallstones, only 14% went on to have symptoms or complications from cholelithiasis at five years (Dig Dis Sci. 1994;39:1704-1707), similar to data from the general population. Consequently, most authorities no longer recommend prophylactic cholecystectomy for asymptomatic diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Gallbladder problems occur fairly frequently in people with diabetes, so if you're a diabetic and you've recently had your gallbladder removed, you're not alone. While you tried to cope with your diseased gallbladder before your surgery, you probably needed to cut back on fat in your diet to minimize symptoms. After gallbladder removal surgery -- known in medical parlance as cholecystectomy -- your doctor may tell you to gradually return to your previous diet, perhaps with an emphasis on certain nutrient groups. However, because you have diabetes, you'll need to continue to carefully watch what you eat. Fortunately, the diet for gallbladder removal patients and the diet recommended for diabetics contain many of the same elements. Video of the Day Following your gallbladder removal surgery, you may find you have difficulty digesting meals that contain a lot of fat. That's because your gallbladder's primary function was to help you process fats. You may experience diarrhea following meals, especially particularly fatty ones. So, steer clear of fried foods to prevent digestive problems, and skip fatty sauces and gravies, as they contain too much fat. Because you're diabetic, stick with healthier fats in small quantities. For example, choose olive oil instead of butter for stir fries, and consider having fish for dinner instead of meat, because fish contains healthy fats known as omega-3 fatty acids. Limit your fat at each meal to 3 grams or less to avoid digestive problems. You may know that a high-fiber diet can help you manage your diabetes by stabilizing and normalizing your blood sugar levels. In addition, getting plenty of fiber may help your digestive system normalize your bowel movements following gallbladder removal surgery, reducing the incidence of diarrhea and c Continue reading >>

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