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Gallbladder Pain Metformin

Cholecystitis - Liver And Gallbladder Disorders - Merck Manuals Consumer Version

Cholecystitis - Liver And Gallbladder Disorders - Merck Manuals Consumer Version

Cholecystitis is inflammation of the gallbladder, usually resulting from a gallstone blocking the cystic duct. Typically, people have abdominal pain that lasts more than 6 hours, fever, and nausea. Ultrasonography can usually detect signs of gallbladder inflammation. The gallbladder is removed, often using a laparoscope. Cholecystitis is the most common problem resulting from gallbladder stones. It occurs when a stone blocks the cystic duct, which carries bile from the gallbladder (see Figure: View of the Liver and Gallbladder ). Cholecystitis is classified as acute or chronic. Acute cholecystitis begins suddenly, resulting in severe, steady pain in the upper abdomen. The pain usually lasts more than 6 hours. At least 95% of people with acute cholecystitis have gallstones . The inflammation almost always begins without infection, although infection may follow later. Inflammation may cause the gallbladder to fill with fluid and its walls to thicken. Rarely, a form of acute cholecystitis without gallstones ( acalculous cholecystitis ) occurs. However, the gallbladder may contain sludge (microscopic particles of materials similar to those in gallstones). Acalculous cholecystitis is more serious than other types of cholecystitis. It tends to occur after the following: Critical illnesses such as serious injuries, severe burns , or a bloodstream infection ( sepsis ) Acute acalculous cholecystitis can occur in young children, perhaps developing from a viral or another infection. Chronic cholecystitis is gallbladder inflammation that has lasted a long time. It almost always results from gallstones and from prior attacks of acute cholecystitis . Chronic cholecystitis is characterized by repeated attacks of pain (biliary colic) that occur when gallstones periodically block the c Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

Will You Have Gallbladder Attack With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Gallbladder Attack With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 53 year old man who takes Suboxone, Nitrostat NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Metformin Induced Acute Pancreatitis

Metformin Induced Acute Pancreatitis

Go to: Case Report Nineteen year-old-man, known case of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus for 4 y on 1 g metformin twice daily since diagnosis of his diabetes. He was in his usual state of health till he presented to the emergency department reporting nausea, vomiting and epigastric pain for 3 d. On physical examination, his height was 170 cm and body weight 99 kg; body mass index (BMI) 34.3 kg/m2, looked mildly dehydrated. Vitals signs were stable. Systemic examination was unremarkable, apart from mild epigastric tenderness. Laboratory investigations showed HbA1c 7.7%, Creatinine 58 µmol/L, Amylase 462 units/l (normal range < 100), Lipase 1378 units/l (0–60), white blood cells 16.8/mm3 (4–11) 80% of which was neutrophils, CRP 258 mg/l (0–5), Mg 0.76 mmol/l (0.7–1.05), Ca 2.17 mmol/l (2.2–2.6), AST 18 units/l (< 39), ALT 34 units/l (< 41), TG 0.95 mmol/l (< 2.3), Lactate 1.4 mmol/l (0.5–1.6). Abdominal Ultrasound and ERCP were done for the patient, results showed no gallstones and clear biliary tract, respectively. CT confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, with no identifiable cause. The patient was admitted to ICU for close monitoring and further investigation. Normalization of Amylase and Lipase was reached after Metformin cessation, and Supportive treatment in the form of IV insulin and IV fluids. Other potential causes of pancreatitis were excluded. Patient was discharged home in stable condition after 2 weeks. Few days later, after re-exposure to Metformin, he presented with recurrence of his previous symptoms, and elevation of Amylase and Lipase was documented. As a result, Metformin was suspended with improvement of his symptoms and biochemical profile. Continue reading >>

Possible Medication Induced Pancreatitis?

Possible Medication Induced Pancreatitis?

Hi all, I'm new here. So, about 4 years ago I was diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome, and educated to lose 50 pounds, and I was put on metformin for insulin resistance. About 6 months after starting metformin, I began having random pains in my mid chest, right under my sternum that would radiate around my right side, up my esophagus and into my right jaw, and pierce through my back. I let this pain go on for about 2 years because it would only last a few days. About 2 years ago, I got sick of it, decided it was my gallbladder and had that removed. I felt great for about 9 months, then I had all the same symptoms come back, and I thought this cant be, I had my gallbladder out... why in the eff do I feel this pain again. Once again, it lasted about 4 days, I wouldnt eat anything then the pain would go away. I went to the doctor, drew some labs, had an ultrasound, upper endoscopy...the works. They decided I must be having esophogeal spasms. SO... I have had about 4 attacks since then, they all last for about 3-5 days and as long as I dont eat or drink carbonated things I'm ok. This last one started 4 days ago, and it dawned on me that I am horribly nauseated and have pain that goes onto the left and right side now, and have nasty loose stools that are bright yellow. I'm also very, very tender under my sternum and along my bottom left rib cage (not to mention fatigued). Holy crap, maybe I have pancreatitis. I am a nurse, and I dont know why it took me so long to realize that! *worlds worst patient right here* Anyways, I got to researching about how different medications can cause pancreatititis, and I ran into a few articles on how people developed pancreatitits due to taking metformin because it overstimulates the pancreas. I rarely drink (maybe a few drinks 1-2 t Continue reading >>

Avoid The Metformin Bandwagon

Avoid The Metformin Bandwagon

From diabetes to cancer, berberine matches - or beats - this patent medicine every time! As many know, metformin is the number one prescription medication for type-2 diabetes. The patent for the name-brand of this patent medicine, Glucophage®, expired years ago and as a result generic-brand competition (metformin) brought this patent medicine’s price down so that it’s relatively inexpensive, especially when compared with nearly any other medication still covered by a patent. Mainstream medical research has found other uses for this un-natural molecule, including (but not limited to) lipid, blood pressure, and insulin resistance lowering effects, anti-cancer effects, improvement of polycystic ovarian syndrome, combatting Alzheimer’s disease, and extending life span in mice. Surprising guests on the metformin bandwagon Some proponents of natural therapies – including, surprisingly, two nationally and internationally circulated health magazines – have climbed on the metformin bandwagon, writing articles about the “health benefits” of metformin, and even advocating that otherwise healthy people take this patent medicine every day as a preventive. They admit that there are known side effects, but write that these are few, and that the benefits outweigh the risks. If there aren’t any natural treatment alternatives that are as effective, or more effective, than a patent medicine or other un-natural molecule – especially in serious or life-threatening situations – then the use of a patent medication of course makes sense. But when there are natural alternatives that work just as well or better, the rule is – and always should be – to “Copy Nature.” Human bodies are formed from the molecules of planet Earth, and powered by the energies of this planet Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Gallbladder problems occur fairly frequently in people with diabetes, so if you're a diabetic and you've recently had your gallbladder removed, you're not alone. While you tried to cope with your diseased gallbladder before your surgery, you probably needed to cut back on fat in your diet to minimize symptoms. After gallbladder removal surgery -- known in medical parlance as cholecystectomy -- your doctor may tell you to gradually return to your previous diet, perhaps with an emphasis on certain nutrient groups. However, because you have diabetes, you'll need to continue to carefully watch what you eat. Fortunately, the diet for gallbladder removal patients and the diet recommended for diabetics contain many of the same elements. Video of the Day Following your gallbladder removal surgery, you may find you have difficulty digesting meals that contain a lot of fat. That's because your gallbladder's primary function was to help you process fats. You may experience diarrhea following meals, especially particularly fatty ones. So, steer clear of fried foods to prevent digestive problems, and skip fatty sauces and gravies, as they contain too much fat. Because you're diabetic, stick with healthier fats in small quantities. For example, choose olive oil instead of butter for stir fries, and consider having fish for dinner instead of meat, because fish contains healthy fats known as omega-3 fatty acids. Limit your fat at each meal to 3 grams or less to avoid digestive problems. You may know that a high-fiber diet can help you manage your diabetes by stabilizing and normalizing your blood sugar levels. In addition, getting plenty of fiber may help your digestive system normalize your bowel movements following gallbladder removal surgery, reducing the incidence of diarrhea and c Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pancreatitis | Diabetic Connect

Metformin And Pancreatitis | Diabetic Connect

I was misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes and prescribed metformin. 4 days after starting the prescription I ended up in hospital fighting for my life with pancreatitis. Doctor should have advised me not to eat or drink after midnight before taking the test. I've had 3 other Doctors agree I never had type 2 diabetes. Now the tail of my pancreas is necrotic. They are trying to say it wasn't the metformin, but when I drank alcohol 25yrs earlier was the cause. I call B.S. can't get a real diagnosis of reason I got pancreatitis. Then I read this article, any help would be appreciated since my pancreas will continue to die slowly. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2009. I was started on 500 mg Metformin twice daily but had a bad reaction to it so was taken off it. Five years later, a new doctor wanted me to try taking it again, this time extended release. I only took 500 mg once daily as I was afraid to approach my previous dosage for fear of the same reaction. I was on Metformin for only a year, at which time I contracted acute pancreatitis and sepsis. Was admitted to the hospital, had a seizure (presumably because of the sepsis) and I experienced cardiac arrest. My heart was restarted with CPR. I experienced kidney failure and my lungs started to fill up with fluid. Was on a respirator for several days then when they tried to extubate me. I went into cardiac arrest again. I stayed on the respirator for several more days until they were finally able to get me off it and I started to wake up and kidneys started to function again. Since that time I have been on only insulin, no oral medications of any kind. I had NONE of the risk factors for pancreatitis, except oral medications for diabetes (which IS a risk factor). But I didn't know it at the time. I just trusted the d Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Referred Pain, Constipation, & Gallstones

Gallbladder Referred Pain, Constipation, & Gallstones

Home / Health Articles / Digestive Health / Gallbladder Health Part I: Be Good to Your Gallbladder Its There For a Reason Gallbladder Health Part I: Be Good to Your Gallbladder Its There For a Reason Gallbladder problems including gallbladder attacks are very common reasons for which people seek medical care. The pain and discomfort can unfortunately result in the removal of the little green organ followed by dietary restrictions (often low fat). But of course, all of our organs are there for one reason or another and although we can live without the gallbladder, removing it is simply removing a symptom of a problem, not the actual cause. In this two-part article on the gallbladder Ill discuss why you have a gallbladder, why you should want to keep it (and keep it healthy), warning signs that your gallbladder isnt working well, risk factors, and natural treatments and lifestyle changes you can make to improve your gallbladder and overall health; yeah! If I can just save one more gallbladder Ill be a happy guy. Gallbladder Physiology: Bile is so Good for You Lets take a brief lesson in gallbladder physiology here, and Ill make it interesting and relevant to your everyday health. The gallbladder is a small organ that sits tucked up underneath the liver in the upper right side of your abdomen. It concentrates and stores bile produced by the liver, and along with the enzyme lipase secreted by the pancreas, it aids in the digestion of fats in the gut. When fats from food enter the digestive tract they stimulate the secretion of a type of hormone called cholecystokinin (CCK) in the upper part of the small intestine the duodenum. This, along with the stomachs secretion of hydrochloric acid, signals the gallbladder to release some of its approximately 50mL of bile into the gut Continue reading >>

What Causes Gallstones? | Gallstones - Sharecare

What Causes Gallstones? | Gallstones - Sharecare

David A. Terschluse, MD on behalf of Oak Hill Hospital David Terschluse, MD from Oak Hill Hospital, says that gallstones are usually more of a genetic disease, rather than diet affecting it. The gallbladder is a small organ just under your liver on the right side of your abdomen. Its function is to release bile, which breaks down fat. Gallstones are formed by the gallbladder. While we dont know the exact reason that theyre formed, we do know that certain people are at higher risk: people who are obese, older than 40, have diabetes, dont get physical activity, are pregnant or have rapid weight loss or frequent fasting. Normally, the gallbladder makes and stores bile. Then, when you eat a meal with fat, it releases that bile into the intestine.If someone has gallstones, when the gallbladder squeezes to release the bile, the gallstone blocks it -- sort of like trying to squeeze out a tube of toothpaste while youre blocking the opening.One of the older tests of gallbladder function involved drinking a really high-fat liquid to cause it to contract and release bile. This can trigger pain if you have gallstones.Over time, the stones can lead to a gallbladder infection and inflammation. To prevent gallstones, you need to avoid the main risk factors for them. That means sticking to a healthy diet and weight, and getting exercise regularly. If you already have gallstones but want to prevent more attacks, you should try to avoid high-fat meals (think fried foods, processed foods such as donuts and cookies, whole-milk dairy products and fatty red meat), as these are what would trigger the gallbladder to release a large amount of bile. Also avoid crash diets, as the sudden weight loss can trigger worsening stones. Gallstones affect up to 20 million Americans and are twice as commo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Class Linked To Bile Duct And Gallbladder Disease

Diabetes Drug Class Linked To Bile Duct And Gallbladder Disease

A popular class of drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of bile duct and gallbladder disease. The class, GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1) receptor agonists, is given via an injection and includes Byetta (exenatide), Victoza (liraglutide) and Trulicity (dulaglutide). Health records of more than 1.5 million patients with type 2 diabetes in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada who were taking an antidiabetic medication were examined in the study, which was published in JAMA Internal Medicine. GLP-1s were shown to cause a 79% increased risk of developing symptoms associated with bile duct and gallbladder disease compared to those not on any diabetes drug. Put another way, about 3 more patients per 1,000 exhibited symptoms compared to those not taking the medication. The most common adverse effect seen in this population were gallstones. Another class of diabetes drugs, DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase 4) inhibitors, which are given as a pill and act in a similar way as GLP-1s, did not have the increased risk of bile duct and gallbladder disease. DPP-4s on the market include Januvia (sitagliptin), Onglyza (saxagliptin) and Tradjenta (linagliptin). However, both GLP-1s and DPP-4s were not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. “It’s important that clinicians and patients alike be well informed about possible adverse effects,” Laurent Azoulay, PhD, a senior investigator at the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal and the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “As a result of the gallbladder finding, it would be prudent for doctors to warn their patients to seek treatment if they experience symptoms, such as pain in their right side.” Jonathan Block is MedShadow’s content editor. He has pre Continue reading >>

Side Conversations: Metformin

Side Conversations: Metformin

Even though it has been over a year since I ceased taking metformin , I still question my decision to do so. With news reports touting the benefits of this inexpensive and trusted prescription medication, I ask myself the same questions almost every day. Did I try hard enough? Did I try long enough? Am I doing harm by sticking to diet and exercise? While at the Roche Diabetes Social Media Summit last week, my inability to tolerate metformin came up in a couple of side conversations. The first came soon after Christel introduced me to Andreas Stuhr, M.D., medical director of Roche Diabetes Care North America (and someone living with type 1 diabetes). As I told my story, he did not judge or encourage me to try again, even agreeing that it is not the best option for someone with prior irritable bowel issues. I also mentioned how I experienced the best blood glucose readings of my short type 2 diabetes life almost immediately after stopping metformin. This did not seem to come as a surprise to Dr. Stuhr, as he seemed to indicate that the positive effects on blood glucose can sometimes outlast the medication. Christel politely interrupted and asked me if being involved in online message boards and in the diabetes blogging community had any impact on how long I stayed on the drug that was causing so much gastrointestinal distress. I explained that I would have quit a lot sooner had I not had the support of people who suggested extended release metformin (still got sick), fiber supplements (still got sick), and changing the timing of medicating myself (still got sick). The second conversation happened on the way from the hotel (paid for by Roche) to the airport (flight paid by Roche) in the town car (also paid for by Roche). The evening before, I had been impressed as Wil tal Continue reading >>

Metformin And Gallbladder Problems

Metformin And Gallbladder Problems

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I just want this out there to maybe help others avoid surgery. I had a lot of stomach problems with met from day one (such as diarhea, stomach spasms, extreme admoninal pain and cold sweats in middle of night followed by explosions (use your imagination). I tolerated this all for the overwhelming desire to conceive. About 8 weeks into taking this I experienced terrible pain in my chest, neck, throat and back. I went to pcp and told him I suspected the met but he said no and ordered, bloodwork, xrays and ultrasound. (about $5000 plus in tests) I was told I had sludge in my gallbladder and immediately sent to a surgeon to have it removed. He also said that the ultrasound revealed I had complex cysts in my left ovary and needed a MRI (another $4000 ) I told him that it was normal for me to have cysts due to PCOS but he isisted on the test. He had nurse call me back in a week to reveal that OMG, I have PCOS!!!. I told him before he did this 2 hour MRI that I had PCOS. Now to the surgeon, The week before I saw him, I stopped taking the Met because I figured if I really had to have surgery, I didnt want to get pregnant yet anyway and for my own peace of mind, I wanted to rule out the Met as cause of the intense pain. The pain went away 3 days after I stopped the met and has remained gone since. The surgeon scheduled another ultrasound and a hapabilary scan (spelling stinks) (another $3000. in tests) that revealed that sludge was gone and my gallbladder function was fine. My advise is that if you have terrible chest Continue reading >>

For Pcos, 13 Side Effects Of Metformin You Should Know About

For Pcos, 13 Side Effects Of Metformin You Should Know About

Did you know that 10%- 25% of women who take Glucophage just don't feel well? They experience a general malaise, fatigue and occasional achiness that lasts for varying lengths of time. Malaise a warning signal for your doctor to closely monitor your body systems, including liver, kidneys, and GI tract. About one third of women on metformin experience gastrointestinal disturbances, including nausea, occasional vomiting and loose, more frequent bowel movements, or diarrhea. This problem occurs more often after meals rich in fats or sugars, so eating a healthier diet will help. The symptoms lessen over time, so if you can tolerate the GI upset for a few weeks, it may go away. Some women have found it helps to start with a very low dose and gradually increase it. Most people think that aside from possible gastrointestinal upset, there are no side effects from taking metformin, and thus you can take it for a very long time. This is not true! The sneakiest side effect of all is a vitamin B12 insufficiency. A substance formed in the stomach called "intrinsic factor" combines with B12 so that it can be transferred into the blood. Metformin interferes with the ability of your cells to absorb this intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex.(12) Over the long term, vitamin B12 insufficiency is a significant health risk. B12 is essential to the proper growth and function of every cell in your body. It's required for synthesis of DNA and for many crucial biochemical functions. There is also a link between B12 insufficiency and cardiovascular disease. According to some research, 10%-30% of patients show evidence of reduced vitamin B12 absorption. The Hospital de Clnicas de Porto Alegre in Brazil has shown that one of every three diabetics who takes metformin for at least a year have evide Continue reading >>

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