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Gain Muscle Diabetes

More Muscle Mass Knocks Out Insulin Resistance And Prediabetes

More Muscle Mass Knocks Out Insulin Resistance And Prediabetes

Having more muscle mass can protect against insulin resistance and prediabetes, no matter overall body size, researchers said.… In a cross-sectional study, every 10% increase in the ratio of skeletal muscle mass to total body weight was associated with an 11% reduction in risk of insulin resistance and a 12% drop in risk of transitional, prediabetes, or overt diabetes. The findings point to the importance of gauging muscle mass, in addition to other established risk factors such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, when assessing a patient’s metabolic health, the researchers said. The results may also have implications for the role of muscle-building exercises in preventing metabolic dysfunction. It’s known that very low muscle mass (sarcopenia) is a risk factor for insulin resistance, but it’s unclear whether increasing muscle mass outside of the sarcopenic range can boost insulin sensitivity or protect against diabetes. So to determine whether increases in muscle mass are associated with improved glucose regulation, the researchers looked at data on 13,644 patients from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III, conducted from 1988 to 1994. Patients had data on homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c); prevalence of transitional, prediabetes, or overt diabetes (PMD); and prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus. These four factors served as the study outcomes. Muscle mass was assessed via bioelectrical impedance, which measures opposition to the flow of an electric current through body tissues, determining total body water to estimate body composition. The researchers found that all four of the outcomes declined across quartiles from lowest to highest skeletal muscle index, or t Continue reading >>

Interleukin-18 Activates Skeletal Muscle Ampk And Reduces Weight Gain And Insulin Resistance In Mice

Interleukin-18 Activates Skeletal Muscle Ampk And Reduces Weight Gain And Insulin Resistance In Mice

Circulating interleukin (IL)-18 is elevated in obesity, but paradoxically causes hypophagia. We hypothesized that IL-18 may attenuate high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We studied mice with a global deletion of the α-isoform of the IL-18 receptor (IL-18R−/−) fed a standard chow or HFD. We next performed gain-of-function experiments in skeletal muscle, in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. We show that IL-18 is implicated in metabolic homeostasis, inflammation, and insulin resistance via mechanisms involving the activation of AMPK in skeletal muscle. IL-18R−/− mice display increased weight gain, ectopic lipid deposition, inflammation, and reduced AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle. Treating myotubes or skeletal muscle strips with IL-18 activated AMPK and increased fat oxidation. Moreover, in vivo electroporation of IL-18 into skeletal muscle activated AMPK and concomitantly inhibited HFD-induced weight gain. In summary, IL-18 enhances AMPK signaling and lipid oxidation in skeletal muscle implicating IL-18 in metabolic homeostasis. The cytokine interleukin (IL)-18 was identified ∼15 years ago as a cofactor that, together with IL-12, stimulates production of interferon-γ (1). This ∼18-kDa cytokine, which has structural similarities to the IL-1 cytokine family, is widely expressed in many mammalian cells and tissues, including liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, pancreas, brain, and endothelium (2). IL-18 is best known for its role in inflammation, whereby proinflammatory stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide, Fas ligand, and tumor necrosis factor-α lead to caspase-1–mediated cleavage of pro-IL-18 into mature IL-18. IL-18 then can signal via a heterodimer of the transmembrane IL-18 receptors (α and Continue reading >>

How Building Muscle Makes Life More Awesome

How Building Muscle Makes Life More Awesome

Muscle-building used to be a topic of interest only for meatheads – hardcore bodybuilders or athletes. Not anymore. In fact, building muscle could be as important for “Everyday Joe’s and Jane’s” as it is for athletes. While it might look cool to carry more muscle on your frame, the health benefits far outweigh the aesthetics. Simply put, more muscle has a significant effect on quality of life. Especially later in life. The average person begins losing lean body mass as young as 25 years of age.[i] By age 40, lean mass decreases about 8% per decade until age 70, at which time lean mass loss accelerates to 15% per decade.[ii] In the United States, 20% of the population will be over 65 years old by 2029.[iii] In the developed world, those over 80 years old make up the fastest growing subgroup of the population.[iv] That means there are a lot of people at an age where a loss of lean mass could become a serious issue. It also means that if you’re still a young adult, you should do everything you can to maintain, or even build more lean mass than you have today. Someday you’re going to be an old man or woman. You’ll look back and say “I sure wish I would have taken better care of myself” or you’re going to say “I’m glad I took care of myself.” With your future health in mind, consider all the awesomeness you have to gain from enhancing lean body mass… More Muscle Equals More Strength At the extremes of muscle mass, like competitive bodybuilders, more muscle doesn’t always equate to more strength. But for us natural mortals, for the most part, the more muscle you build, the stronger you’ll be. The more strength you have, the more physically you’re prepared for everyday activities; carrying groceries, lifting kids (or your significant other), Continue reading >>

The Insulin Advantage

The Insulin Advantage

Here's what you need to know... If you think bulking and cutting are seasonal, think again. By controlling your insulin you can allow your body to build muscle and burn fat daily. Muscle is made of protein. To build muscle, your body must synthesize more protein than it catabolizes. Insulin is responsible for muscle growth and the storage of muscle glycogen. Excess insulin production will lead to the storage of body fat and the inhibition of fat burning. To build muscle and burn fat on the same day, manipulate your insulin production by consuming carbs strategically. Prioritize carb consumption around workout time. Daily Manipulation Forget the idea of the seasonal "bulking" and "cutting" phases that the newbies love to talk about. Instead, bulk and cut throughout the day, maximizing muscle gains while controlling body fat. How? By manipulating insulin. Depending on your background, you probably think of insulin as either the anabolic Holy Grail or the natural enemy of fat loss. Which is it? Insulin is Like a Weapon It's human nature to label something as good or bad, but this myopic outlook often does us more harm than good. Those wanting fat loss call insulin the "bad" hormone that's making us chubby by inhibiting fat burning and increasing fat storage. Those wanting muscle growth call insulin the anabolic and anti-catabolic phenomenon. How can one hormone be a fat boy's nemesis and a skinny boy's best defense? The truth is, insulin is like a weapon: it can hurt you or help you. And the good news is we can accurately predict how insulin will act. Know Your Opponent Insulin is an anabolic hormone. In fact, it's even more anabolic than growth hormone. The problem? It's indiscriminately anabolic and doesn't care whether it helps with the building of muscle or the accumul Continue reading >>

Six Ways To Prevent (or Reverse) Type 2 Diabetes

Six Ways To Prevent (or Reverse) Type 2 Diabetes

Get active, earn a patch. 3 exercises to Build muscle fast What’s causing our diabetes epidemic? TO MANY AMERICANS, diabetes mellitus is “what Grandma had.” And they don’t give it another thought. But diabetes is downright terrifying, a disease whose tentacles reach into the scariest of health complications: blindness, amputation, kidney disease, nerve damage, peripheral arterial disease, heart attack, and stroke. While family history, race, and age all play a role in your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes—and these factors can’t be changed—some people can decrease additional risk of developing the disease by maintaining a healthy body weight and getting regular exercise. The more fatty tissue you carry on your body, specifically in your abdomen area, the more resistant your cells become to insulin, according to the Mayo Clinic. And being a couch potato doesn’t help. Not only does physical activity help you control weight, exercise actually makes your cells more sensitive to insulin so it can regulate blood sugar more effectively. More than 78 million Americans are dangerously close to developing Type 2 diabetes. They have what’s known as pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome, characterized by consistently high blood-sugar levels. Scariest of all: Most of them don’t know they have it—including, unfortunately, some of you reading this magazine. What you can do The welcome news in all this is that people can achieve a healthy weight by making some simple lifestyle changes. Diabetes researchers say that many people can prevent Type 2 diabetes (in some cases, even reverse it) by losing weight, exercising, stopping smoking, and eating a healthier diet rich in vegetables, whole grains, and nutrient-dense fruits. Below you’ll find specific actions you ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Building Muscle

Diabetes And Building Muscle

Having diabetes won’t stop you from building muscle. However, it’s wise to follow a few precautions when it comes to gaining muscle. There are many different types of exercise and one of the most popular is strength or power training, which is very effective for building strong bones and muscles. Strong muscles collect oxygen and nutrients from the blood much more efficiently than weak ones, meaning that any physical activity you do will require less cardiac work and put less strain on your heart. As well as being good for the heart, they also improve weight control and help the body remain sensitive to the hormone insulin, which is vital for keeping blood sugar levels in check and preventing or controlling Here are some tips on how you can build strong, lean muscle, without affecting your diabetes: Load up on protein Protein intake is vital for building muscle. However, your body constantly drains its protein reserves for other uses such as producing hormones, resulting in less protein available for muscle building. To counteract this, you need to build and store new proteins faster than your body breaks down old proteins. You should look to consume about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which is roughly the maximum amount your body can use in a day. Good sources of protein include: Chicken Tuna Eggs, milk and cottage cheese Protein shakes (see below for more about shakes) Remember, the more protein your body stores (protein synthesis), the larger your muscles grow. Have a protein shake before your workout Protein shakes are very effective for improving strength. While many trainers have a post-workout shake, research has shown that drinking a shake containing at least 6 grams of amino acids – the muscle-building blocks of protein – and 35 grams of c Continue reading >>

Losing Bodyfat Or Gaining Muscle Mass: Which Is More Important?

Losing Bodyfat Or Gaining Muscle Mass: Which Is More Important?

Muscle mass comprises between 30 and 50 percent of your body’s total weight -- the more the better. Composed of more than 650 muscles, it is the primary user of calories in the active human body, and the storage facility for most of the body’s protein. Muscles are the motors which move the skeleton -- the system of levers we use to interact with our environment -- and are therefore responsible for our physical relationship with our surroundings. Fat, on the other hand, is where calories are stored, not used. Mostly, fat just lays there, using very few calories itself but hoping you’ll use the calories it stores as fuel for muscle contraction. In great quantities, the few hormones produced in adipose tissue may become metabolically significant, and in great quantities adipose tissue can become the host of significant amounts of inflammation. But bodyfat itself is not the problem. The processes that allow for the accumulation of bodyfat are the problem. Accumulating bodyfat means that there is an imbalance which must be addressed, usually by correcting the quality and quantity of the diet and physical activity schedule. On very rare occasions, there is a profound hormonal imbalance, too. However, morbidly obese people will almost always show you how they got that way if you accompany them to the grocery store. No matter what they tell you, these people eat lots and lots of very s***** food -- lots of fat, sugar, and cheap alcohol. They are a separate situation, and not the topic of this discussion. We’re discussing you -- either your slightly overweight, normal, or underweight self, of the age demographic that reads PJ Media -- and your muscles. And for you, gaining muscle is more important than losing fat. Muscle is important metabolically, in a much more signifi Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

When I tell people I'm diabetic, they look at me like I'm joking. They find it hard to believe that here is this muscled up guy, with relatively low body fat, who is a diabetic. Often times when we think of a diabetic we think of someone who has made poor food choices their whole life, is overweight, and often lazy. Well things aren't always as they appear. I was diagnosed with diabetes over a year ago, and was borderline diabetic the year prior. I have asked myself over and over again what could have caused this. Was it steroid use over the years? Was it massive food consumption and carbs? Was it just in my cards since I have a family history of auto immune disorders (my mother has chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia)? The thing is I'll never know. My best guess is a perfect storm of limited sleep, excessive dieting which caused my liver to dump glucose into my body instead of food, and elevated cortisol levels for far too long. You see, I never really stopped dieting after this show I competed in back in 2009. I stayed very lean year round, and ate like I was contest prepping all the time. But that's neither here nor there, it is what it is now. Just before I was diagnosed with diabetes I noticed how thirsty I was all the time. It was worse at night, I just could not drink enough water to satisfy myself. I could literally drink 5-6 20 ounce bottles of water within an hour, and still felt thirsty. I also noticed how tired I was. I would wake up, go to the gym, and an hour later I felt like going back to sleep again. Then when it really was time to go to sleep at night, I could not fall asleep for shit!! I tossed and turned, woke up every couple hours, and day in and day out this was how it was for a couple months. I also noticed how irritable I was after eating a Continue reading >>

How To Gain Muscle With Diabetes

How To Gain Muscle With Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Preparing to ExerciseBuilding Muscle with ExerciseStaying Safe While ExercisingEating to Build MuscleCommunity Q&A Staying active is very important if you have diabetes. Some studies indicate that weight training exercises can prevent and even reverse the onset of type 2 diabetes — muscle is a dense tissue, and it has a high metabolic rate. As you build more muscle, your body burns more calories even when you are just sitting there doing nothing, versus someone with less muscle. Although there are great benefits, you do have to use caution when exercising. By learning the proper steps to take, you can build muscle mass even with diabetes. Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Breaking news! Some newly discovered compounds have just been found to turn off all of the genes that cause diabetes. Are these compounds found in a pill bottle? No! Instead, you’ll find them on your dinner plate — in rye bread and pasta. (As I recently wrote in one of my blogs, rye contains special phytonutrients that turn off all the genes responsible for diabetes — in just a few weeks.) Last week, I explained how to find out if you are pre-diabetic or diabetic. Half of the 24 million people with diabetes don’t know they have it and nearly all the 60 million people with pre-diabetes don’t know they have it. Today, I want to share with you more information about what you can do NOW to prevent and reverse diabetes and pre-diabetes. And rye bread isn’t the only answer — I’ve got a lot more good advice, too. But first I want to emphasize new research that should be headlines news but never saw the light of day. Do our current drugs treatments for diabetes actually work to prevent heart attacks and death? Surely lowering blood sugar in diabetics is an effective strategy for reducing the risk of death and heart disease. It would seem obvious that if diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar, then reducing blood sugar would be beneficial. However elevated sugar is only a symptom, not the cause of the problem. The real problem is elevated insulin unchecked over decades from a highly refined carbohydrate diet, a sedentary lifestyle and environmental toxins. Most medications and insulin therapy are aimed at lowering blood sugar through increasing insulin. In the randomized ACCORD trial of over 10,000 patients, this turns out to be a bad idea. In the intensive glucose-lowering group, there were no fewer heart attacks, and more patients died. Yet we continue to pa Continue reading >>

What Foods Are Good For Building Muscle Mass If You Are Diabetic?

What Foods Are Good For Building Muscle Mass If You Are Diabetic?

Diabetes is a complex disease that requires knowledge, skill and motivation to control it properly. Diabetes involves managing different food sources, exercise and body systems with careful balance. People with diabetes who want to build muscle mass have special challenges, but they are strongly encouraged to work out and build their muscles, according to "The Journal of the American Dietetic Association," JADA. Video of the Day JADA author Craig Williams is a pharmacist who specializes in diabetes. He reports that the use of muscles has a great deal to do with how well the body uses blood glucose. "When insulin works properly, muscle tissue is the single biggest user of glucose in your body," says Williams. When insulin doesn't work properly and doesn't get used in muscles, it begins to accumulate in your bloodstream, raising glucose levels and contributing to deterioration of multiple body systems, such as nerves, eyesight and circulation. To help control your blood sugar, muscle use and muscle health are essential to people with diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the insulin-dependent form. Type 2 Diabetes is insulin-resistant, meaning your body is unable to use your own insulin properly. In the United States, Type 2 diabetes is on the rise due to obesity that is near epidemic. Type 2 diabetics can't use insulin to break down glucose as a fuel source. Instead, the muscles seek to use fatty acids, and this worsens insulin resistance and increases the fat levels in the blood, a condition known as elevated fasting triglycerides. This is why it is crucial for people with diabetes to increase their lean protein intake, as well as complex carbohydrates, when building their muscle mass. Because diabetes can also impair kidney function, it is important for diabetics to not overdo Continue reading >>

Gains In Muscle Mass, Not Just Weight Loss, May Help Lower Diabetes Risk

Gains In Muscle Mass, Not Just Weight Loss, May Help Lower Diabetes Risk

Lose weight. That’s often the first advice from doctors to their pre-diabetic patients. But while losing excess fat can help reverse Type 2 diabetes risk factors like insulin resistance and high blood-sugar levels, a new study finds that increasing muscle mass may also help lower risk of the metabolic disease. According to lead researcher, Dr. Preethi Srikanthan, this may be good news for many people with pre-diabetes — a condition that results in higher-than-normal blood sugar, but does not qualify as diabetes — who have difficulty slimming down. “Our findings suggest that beyond focusing on losing weight to improve metabolic health, there may be a role for maintaining fitness and building muscle mass,” Srikanthan, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, said in a statement. “This is a welcome message for many overweight patients who experience difficulty in achieving weight loss, as any effort to get moving and keep fit should be seen as laudable and contributing to metabolic change.” Srikanthan and colleagues based their study on data on 13,644 adults who participated in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III between 1988 and 1994. Looking at the participants’ skeletal muscle index (SMI), a ratio of muscle mass to total body weight, researchers found an association between increasing SMI and a reduction in certain diabetes risk factors: for each 10% increase in SMI, there was an 11% decrease in insulin resistance and a 12% decrease in pre-diabetes. The findings are in line with what is already known about the metabolic effects of muscle and fat. “Extra fat has bad effects, but more muscle has good effects. These data are also consistent with dat Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Diabetics To Build Muscle

10 Tips For Diabetics To Build Muscle

November 14 is observed as World Diabetes Day. High time to better know this metabolic disease and learn how to live with it! A person with diabetes has high blood glucose (blood sugar) either because the body’s insulin production is inadequate or because the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin or both. There are two types – Type 1 is insulin dependent, which means you need to take it through injections, and Type 2 is insulin resistant, which means your body is unable to use the available insulin properly. A person with diabetes will need to manage diet, exercise and body systems with utmost care to strike a balance. Apart from following specific diet tips, people must work out and build muscle for healthy maintenance of blood sugar levels. A customised workout and diet plan to build muscle works best, but the following guidelines may be helpful to anyone with diabetes: Check blood glucose levels before and immediately after the exercise session. It should not be too low or too high. Adjustments in the dosage of medicine or insulin may be required depending on those levels. Eat a small high-protein high-complex carbohydrate meal or a healthy pre-workout snack 30 to 60 minutes before exercise to keep you going. If you are new to strength training, start with at least 2 days of strength training each week. This must cover all major muscles of the body and intense enough to increase protein synthesis and build muscle. Those experienced with weights must focus on doing large muscle exercises such as squats, deadlifts, bench press, leg press, pull-ups, bent-over rows, shoulder press and dips. Add two or three sets of 8 or 12 repetitions to your workout, with about 60 seconds’ rest between sets. Always be prepared for the unexpected. Carry fast-acting high Continue reading >>

Building Muscle Helps Reverse Diabetes

Building Muscle Helps Reverse Diabetes

EXERCISE The key to exercising your way free of type 2 diabetes is to become healthily muscle-bound by doing weight training, says exercise physiologist Rob Newton. That’s because muscles are the greatest sinkwells of blood glucose in the body — so the more muscle tissue you have, the less extraneous glucose will be circulating, wreaking damage on blood vessels, organs and tissues. This also guards against insulin resistance where the body’s insulin becomes less efficient at controlling blood glucose levels. “Muscle tissue during exercise is the greatest absorber of glucose in the body,” said Professor Newton, from Edith Cowan University’s school of exercise and health sciences. “Even at rest, muscle tissue scavenges glucose out of the blood, helping the body maintain healthy blood glucose levels and preventing insulin resistance.” Professor Newton said research showed that even a single session of resistance or aerobic training reduced blood glucose levels for the following 24 hours in people with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes. “Regular weight training over three to six months can turn around type 2 diabetes and eliminate much of the insulin resistance and adverse effects,” he said. New research was indicating that increasing muscle mass might be more important than fat loss in controlling high blood glucose and insulin resistance. Weight-loss strategies such as lap band surgery, dietary restriction and appetite-suppressing medication — that resulted in a big food and kilojoule restriction — also result in a loss of muscle and might compromise the goal of reversing type 2 diabetes, Professor Newton said. In such cases, without specific exercise to maintain muscle bulk, the body lost both fat and muscle tissue, thereby lowering it Continue reading >>

Weight Training Can Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Weight Training Can Lower Risk Of Diabetes

You know that hitting the gym is essential if you want to build muscle, but the benefits of weight training don't end there. A new study done by the Harvard School of Public Health, suggests that men who practice weight training regularly may be able to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes significantly. Until now, we knew that aerobics helped prevent type 2 diabetes, but this research shows that weight training can be done as an alternative for those who aren't into aerobics. However, combining the two has the best results. The researchers followed 32,002 men from 1990 to 2008. Some of these men were gym goers, and the amount of which they trained varied. At the end of the study, 2,278 of these men developed new cases of diabetes. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done It was clear that even a small amount of weight training could help lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Men who trained for up to 59 minutes per week lowered their risk by 12%. The percentage depends on how much you weight train; for the men who trained at least 150 minutes per week, their risk was lowered by 34%. Men who combined 150 minutes of weight training with 150 minutes of aerobics (like brisk walking or running) lowered their r Continue reading >>

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