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Fun Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Did you know these 10 facts about diabetes? About one third of all people with diabetes do not know they have the disease. Type 2 diabetes often does not have any symptoms. Only about five percent of all people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. If you are at risk, type 2 diabetes can be prevented with moderate weight loss (10–15 pounds) and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity (such as brisk walking) each day. A meal plan for a person with diabetes isn’t very different than that which is recommended for people without diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. People with diabetes are twice as likely to develop heart disease than someone without diabetes. Good control of diabetes significantly reduces the risk of developing complications and prevents complications from getting worse. Bariatric surgery can reduce the symptoms of diabetes in obese people. Diabetes costs $174 billion annually, including $116 billion in direct medical expenses. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. About 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There’s a genetic mutation involved in type 2 diabetes, although researchers haven’t been able to pinpoint the exact mutation. You must have a genetic mutation in order to develop type 2—not everyone can get it. If you have a family history, you are at higher risk. Many people are overweight when they’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. However, you don’t have to be overweight to develop it. Type 2 used to be called “adult-onset diabetes” because it was diagnosed mainly in older people. Today, though, more children around the world are being diagnosed with type 2, so type 2 is the more common name now. Most people with type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant, meaning that their bodies don’t use insulin properly. They make more than enough of it, but their cells are resistant to it and do not know how to use it properly. Some people with type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes can usually be managed well with a combination of healthier meal plan choices, physical activity, and oral medications. Some people may have to take insulin in order to get better blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

19 Facts Most People Don't Know About Type 2 Diabetes

19 Facts Most People Don't Know About Type 2 Diabetes

Although type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, there are a lot of misconceptions about what it actually does to the body and why it happens. We reached out to diabetes expert Dr. Dorothy Fink, of NYU Langone Endocrine and Diabetes Center, to dispel the most common diabetes myths. Before we talk about the myths, let's define type 2 diabetes. thinkstockphotos.com According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic condition which causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to be higher than normal, also called "hyperglycemia." It's also known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. "It's defined as having a hemoglobin A1C higher than 6.5 — which is a measure of how much sugar has coated your red blood cells over the last 2-3 months," says Fink. When your A1C is high, that means your body isn't processing sugar correctly and too much glucose is in your blood. T2D is usually treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications, and insulin injection, but it varies by person. 1. There are many different risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes. / Via instagram.com No one thing causes diabetes, it's a multifaceted diagnosis. According to the Mayo Clinic, these are the known risk factors (although not all of these will apply to everyone with T2D): * Weight: Being overweight or obese. * Fat distribution: If your body stores fat primarily in your abdomen. * Inactivity: Getting little or no physical activity. * Family history: Having a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes. * Race: If you are Black, Hispanic, Native American, or Asian American. * Age: Being 45 or older. * Prediabetes: Having a high blood sugar but not high enough to be associated with diabetes, or an A1C between 5.7 and 6.4. * Gestational diabetes: Having hi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fast Facts - Cnn

Diabetes Fast Facts - Cnn

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Here's a look at diabetes, a disease that affects millions of people around the world. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The disease can lead to serious complications such as blindness, kidney damage, cardiovascular disease, limb amputations and premature death. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Prediabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Before developing Type 2 diabetes, people almost always have prediabetes. Research has shown that some long-term damage to the body may occur during prediabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body's immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in the body that make insulin. This form of diabetes usually strikes children and young adults. Only 5-10% of people with diabetes have Type 1. Risk factors for Type 1 diabetes may be autoimmune, genetic or environmental. There is no known way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and in adults, it accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It is associated with older age, obesity, family history, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity. It is more common in African Americans, Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, although still rare, is being diagnosed more frequently. Gestational diabetes is a form Continue reading >>

7 Things You Need To Know About Diabetes

7 Things You Need To Know About Diabetes

Today is World Diabetes Day, a campaign led by the International Diabetes Federation that promotes diabetes awareness and advocacy. So to mark the occasion, we've gathered everything you need to know about the chronic disease that affects 29.1 million Americans. From common misconceptions to the good-for-you habits that can reduce your risk, make sure these facts are on your radar now so you can stay healthy later. 1. One-third of Americans are thought to have prediabetes. Before full-blown diabetes often comes prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal but not so high that an individual is considered diabetic. A whopping one in three Americans suffers from this precursory condition—and 70 percent of those people will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Most people who have it don't know (we're talking like 90 percent), so take this super-quick quiz from Omada Health to assess your risk. 2. You don't have to be overweight to develop type 2 diabetes. You might imagine the typical type 2 patient to be heavy and inactive—and think you're in the clear if you don't fit that description. But more and more, the condition is becoming a problem for the young and thin, too. About 15 percent of people with type 2 diabetes aren't overweight—but that doesn't mean that they're healthy. The culprit is what has become known as "skinny-fat." Translation: You might look healthy on the outside, but any number of unhealthy habits will have your insides behaving as if you are obese—putting you at risk of developing diabetes. 3. Diet soda might be a trigger. You know that diet soda isn't good for you—but did you know that your guilty pleasure might also lead to an added risk of developing diabetes? According to research published in the journal Nature, consum Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Not everything you hear about diabetes is true. That’s why it is important to get the facts, so you can make good decisions to better manage your diabetes. Myth: "Diabetes is not that big of a deal." Fact: Diabetes is a big deal, but if you manage it right, you may be able to help delay or even avoid some diabetes-related health complications down the road. Myth: "People who are overweight eventually get diabetes." Fact: Being overweight is just one risk factor for developing diabetes. There are other factors, such as family history, race or ethnicity, and age. By knowing all of the risk factors, you may better understand your overall risk and what you can do to improve your health. Myth: "Eating too much sugar can cause type 2 diabetes." Fact: As mentioned above, weight gain is one risk factor for getting diabetes. Taking in too many calories causes an increase in weight. Drinking sugary drinks is one way to take in extra calories. The American Diabetes Association recommends not drinking a lot of sugary drinks. Sugar-sweetened drinks include: Regular (non-diet) sodas Fruit drinks including fruit punch Energy drinks Sports drinks Sweetened tea Instead, choose from zero or low-calorie drinks like water, unsweetened tea, coffee, or diet soda. A splash of lemon can also make your drink light and refreshing without the added calories. One 12-ounce can of regular (non-diet) soda contains approximately 150 calories and 40 grams of carbohydrates. Did you know that this is the same amount of carbohydrates in 10 teaspoons of sugar? Myth: "Having diabetes always leads to bad health problems." Fact: If you follow your diabetes care plan, you may be able to delay or prevent diabetes-related health problems. Myth: "It’s your own fault that you have diabetes." Fact: Diabetes isn Continue reading >>

10 Essential Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

10 Essential Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

Your body breaks down the food you eat and uses it for growth and energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body may not be able to accomplish this routine function as efficiently. The good news is “there's a lot people can do to improve their lifestyle and live long, healthy lives,” says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, and director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Here are 10 essential facts you need to know about type 2 diabetes so that you can make the right decisions and stay healthy — for life: It's the most common type of diabetes. More than 23 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, and of those, 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). If you’re 45 or older, you should get tested, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). And people who are overweight and have another risk factor should be tested sooner. Risk factors include: Having a parent or sibling with diabetes Being of African-American, American-Indian, Asian, Hispanic, or of Pacific Islander descent Being sedentary Having high blood pressure Having abnormal cholesterol levels (low HDL or high triglycerides) Having a history of cardiovascular disease Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) If you have diabetes, you should know your blood glucose numbers. One way to know if your treatment is working is to track your blood glucose levels. Target ranges are based on individual considerations. Your doctor will let you know where your numbers should be. Your diet doesn’t have to be restrictive. “A meal plan to better manage diabetes is simply a healthy eating pattern that all of us should be following,” Massey says. The ADA encourages a balanced diet that includes vegetables, Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

"Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children after asthma, but the percentage of kids who have it is still relatively low," says Parents advisor Lori Laffel, MD, chief of the pediatric, adolescent, and young-adult section at Harvard's Joslin Diabetes Center. Here are five important truths about this serious illness. Fact: Most Children Who Get Diabetes Aren't Fat Type 2 diabetes, which is usually triggered by obesity, has gotten a lot of press because it used to strike only adults and is now being diagnosed in kids as young as 6, says Dr. Laffel. Alarming as that is, a greater number of kids get type 1, an autoimmune disease that's been rising 4 percent a year since the 1970s -- especially in young kids. Only 3,700 children are diagnosed with type 2 every year compared with 15,000 who develop type 1, according to a large study that provides the first detailed look at diabetes in U.S. kids. In many ways, the two forms of diabetes are very different. In type 1, which has no known cause, the immune system mistakenly destroys healthy cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone that helps the body get energy from food. To make up for the shortfall, children typically need injections of insulin several times a day. In type 2, the pancreas usually makes plenty of insulin (at least at first), but cells throughout the body have trouble using it -- a condition known as insulin resistance. But no matter what the type, diabetes causes high blood-sugar levels when glucose from food -- the body's equivalent of gasoline for a car -- builds up because it can't get into cells without insulin. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage organs and tissues throughout the body. Fact: White Children Are at the Highest Risk Many people have heard that diabetes is Continue reading >>

23 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

23 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Trivia can be fun and interesting, especially when you are learning about something that is close to home. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does, you might want to learn some interesting facts about this disease. Seeing how greatly treatment has evolved can be empowering. In addition, learning more about this disease can help to increase your awareness and motivate you to take control. As the saying goes, knowledge is power. 23 Interesting Facts About Diabetes The earliest known written record that likely referred to diabetes was in 1500 B.C in the Egyptian Ebers papyrus. It referred to the symptoms of frequent urination. Diabetes symptoms such as thirst, weight loss, and excess urination were recognized for more than 1200 years before the disease was named. The Greek physician Aretaeus (30-90CE) was credited with coming up with the name "diabetes." He recorded a disease with symptoms such as constant thirst (polydipsia), excessive urination (polyuria) and weight loss. He named the condition "diabetes," meaning "a flowing through." Dr. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) called diabetes the "pissing evil" and described the urine of people with type 2 diabetes as "wonderfully sweet, as if it was imbued with honey or sugar." He was also the first to describe pain and stinging from nerve damage due to diabetes. In ancient times, doctors would test for diabetes by tasting urine to see if it was sweet. People who tasted urine to check for diabetes were called "water tasters." Other diagnostic measures included checking to see if urine attracted ants or flies. In the late 1850's, a French physician named Priorry advised his patients with diabetes to eat large quantities of sugar. Obviously, that method of treatment did not last, as sugar increases blood sugars. Back in the Continue reading >>

Basic Facts

Basic Facts

An overview of the most important facts about diabetes. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you want to know basic information. This section gives an overview of the most important facts about diabetes. In this section, you will learn about: What is diabetes?: The definition of diabetes and, very simply, what is happening in your body Symptoms of diabetes: Changes in your body that signal something is wrong Diagnosing diabetes: The medical tests and results that are used to define and diagnose diabetes Whether you are newly diagnosed with diabetes or have had diabetes for many years, it is useful to review this basic information. Continue reading >>

True Life Story: Type 2 Diabetes Facts

True Life Story: Type 2 Diabetes Facts

In this episode of True Life Story, Jimmie shares useful type 2 diabetes facts, as well as discusses how hereditary diabetes can be. In this episode of True Life Story, Jimmie shares her personal story of how she lives a full, creative life with diabetes. She includes useful type 2 diabetes facts, as well as discusses how hereditary diabetes can be. 00:06 My weight throughout my life has been like a roller coaster. 00:10 Sometimes I have three different sizes in my wardrobe. 00:20 As long as I'm busy being creative and 00:23 doing something that fulfills me, I'm not eating as much. 00:28 because that's the downsize 'cuz with the diabetes; you gotta eat the right things. 00:32 So, if I get too busy, I'll forget to eat. 00:35 Oh, I can lose weight, but then the sugar goes down too low. 00:40 So now I have to learn how to balance my life now. 00:49 Whatever, you have inside you that needs to come up and out comes out in colors. 00:55 And that's what my paintings is for me. 01:00 My gr, my mother, my father died from complications of diabetes. 01:06 Both my sisters have type 2 diabetes, I have type 2 diabetes, and 01:11 my granddaughter has type 1 diabetes. 01:23 And I was not ready to receive it at all. 01:35 And it was complications of diabetes. 01:41 I remember he showed me his, when his toes was cut off. 01:52 And I remember one time, the kids came back to tell me, 01:56 ma, grandma had us watching the line in the street. 02:02 She is driving down the street could not see what the kids in the car. 02:07 Making sure that she stayed on the right side of the line, 02:11 cuz she didn't want us to know that she was going blind. 02:16 So with all those things, that made me fight 02:20 because I didn't wanna see my limbs go away or anything else. 02:27 It's time for this, I c Continue reading >>

10 Curious Facts About Diabetes

10 Curious Facts About Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition wherein the body is unable to regulate itself, either by producing insufficient amounts of insulin or proving resistant to insulin. It has a laundry list of horrible side effects, not limited to amputations and blindness, and numbers are at an all-time high. Although linked to obesity, diabetes affects people of all body types, many who barely have enough to eat. According to the International Diabetes Federation, around 382 million people in the world are afflicted, a number they estimate will rise to 592 million by 2035. While medications and careful health management can greatly prolong life, in places like sub-Saharan Africa where such resources are limited, 75 percent of diabetes deaths occur in people under the age of 60. 10 Whiskey Diabetes mellitus literally means “sweet urine,” as those with the disease tend to pass a great deal of sugar when they pee. Before modern testing methods, doctors would actually taste a patient’s urine if they suspected the person had diabetes. Luckily, those days have passed, but bizarrely enough, people continue to drink the urine of diabetics. James Gilpin of London produces “Gilpin Family Whiskey,” which takes the urine of elderly diabetes patients and filters it, then adds it to mash. The sugar in the urine begins the fermentation process, and within a few weeks, a perfectly serviceable whiskey is produced—though Gilpin claims it is better if aged awhile in the bottle. Gilpin Family Whiskey is not sold; rather, it is freely distributed as a “public health statement.” 9 Wilford Brimley If anyone could be considered the “face” of diabetes, it would be Wilford Brimley. Known for his portrayals of gruff, stodgy old men, Brimley has been in dozens of films, including The Natural, Cocoon, and Continue reading >>

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

The word “diabetes” is Greek for “siphon,” which refers to the copious urine of uncontrolled diabetes. “Mellitus” is Latin for “honey” or “sweet,” a name added when physicians discovered that the urine from people with diabetes is sweet with glucose.[8] Scientists predict that there may be 30 million new cases of diabetes in China alone by 2025.[1] The earliest recorded mention of a disease that can be recognized as diabetes is found in the Ebers papyrus (1500 B.C.), which includes directions for several mixtures that could “remove the urine, which runs too often.”[1] The name “diabetes” is attributed to the famed Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia who practiced in the first century A.D. He believed that diabetes was caused by snakebite.[1] William Cullen (1710-1790), a professor of chemistry and medicine in Scotland, is responsible for adding the term “mellitus” (“sweet” or “honey-like”) to the word diabetes.[1] Insulin was coined from the Latin insula (“island”) because the hormone is secreted by the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas.[9] In 1889, Oskar Minkowski (1858-191931) discovered the link between diabetes and the pancreas (pan - “all” + kreas - “flesh) when a dog from which he removed the pancreas developed diabetes.[1] Before the discovery of insulin, surgeons rarely operated on diabetic patients with gangrene because the patients typically would not heal and would inevitably die. On occasion, an area of gangrene would “auto-amputate,” meaning it would dry up and fall off.[1] Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, physicians would often put their patients on starvation or semi-starvation diets, recommending they eat only foods such as oatmeal.[1] In 1996, a 16-year-old girl with diabetes died at he Continue reading >>

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