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Full Fat Milk Diabetes

Whole Milk And Full-fat Dairy May Help You Maintain Weight, Reduce Diabetes Risk

Whole Milk And Full-fat Dairy May Help You Maintain Weight, Reduce Diabetes Risk

Whole Milk And Full-Fat Dairy May Help You Maintain Weight, Reduce Diabetes Risk Poor nutrition is a cause of poor health. While many of us are aware of this fact and want to eat right and improve our health, we sometimes feel confused by the often contradictory messages and scientific findings appearing in the daily news. Tufts University delivered one such surprise this week, turning the tables on low-fat food advocates. People who eat full-fat dairy products are less likely to develop diabetes than those who grimly consume low-fat (and low-pleasure) dairy alternatives, say the Tufts researcher s. Led by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, the research team looked at circulating blood biomarkers and 15 years of data for 3,333 adults participating in the Nurses Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. The team discovered participants with the highest levels of dairy fat in their blood had up to 46 percent lower risk of developing diabetes over the 15-year span compared to those who had the lowest levels of dairy fats in their blood. There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy, Mozaffarian told Time Magazine . Apparently, skim milk is not the hero we once believed. Fat gives things flavor, Julia Child famously said. Anyone doubting the truth of her assertion need only taste, side by side, skim and full-fat milk or low-fat and full-fat yogurt. Taste buds (and Child) never lie. Yet, full-fat dairy products contain more calories than lower fat dairy products and many people want to avoid putting on the extra pounds one of many risk factors for diabetes. So, with the blessing of health experts, many people shifted from regular dairy to skim and other low-fat options in the name of protecting them Continue reading >>

Full Fat Milk Improves Cholesterol Levels

Full Fat Milk Improves Cholesterol Levels

Full fat milk improves cholesterol levels Full fat milk improves cholesterol levels Low zinc levels could be associated with prediabetes risk 09 November 2017 A three-week crossover study shows that drinking full fat, whole milk led to improved cholesterol levels compared to drinking skimmed milk. For decades, skimmed and semi-skimmed milk has been advised as a way of reducing weight and helping to prevent heart disease. However, these guidelines were introduced before rigorous research was carried out to see if the theory was true. In recent years, research has been carried out to test whether eating low fat has scientific validity. So far, the research suggests that full fat dairy is no worse than low fat dairy and may be healthier. Previous studies have shown full fat dairy to be associated with lower risks of type 2 diabetes , for example. In the new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen tested the effects of having 500ml per day of either skimmed milk or whole milk for three weeks and then repeating the test with the other type of milk . The study was randomised so that some participants started with skimmed milk whereas others started with the whole milk first. Cholesterol tests were taken to measure how the different types of milk affected blood lipids such as LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. 18 healthy adults took part in the study and all but one completed it. The results of the study showed that LDL cholesterol did not differ significantly between the two types of milk. However, whole milk was shown to increase the level of HDL cholesterol which reflects a healthier effect on cholesterol levels . The findings provide more evidence that low fat foods are not advantageous and that full fat dairy is likely to be the healthier choice. For up to Continue reading >>

The Case Against Low-fat Milk Is Stronger Than Ever

The Case Against Low-fat Milk Is Stronger Than Ever

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. For years you’ve been told to go for skim over full-fat dairy. Even the latest dietary guidelines for Americans urge people to avoid the full fat, and following this lead, school lunch programs provide only low-fat milk and no whole milk at all, even though they do allow chocolate skim milk with its added sugars. But large population studies that look at possible links between full-fat dairy consumption, weight and disease risk are starting to call that advice into question. And some research suggests people who consume full-fat dairy weigh less and are less likely to develop diabetes, too. MORE: Why Full-Fat Dairy May Be Healthier Than Low-Fat In a new study published in the journal Circulation, Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian and his colleagues analyzed the blood of 3,333 adults enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study of Health Professionals Follow-up Study taken over about 15 years. They found that people who had higher levels of three different byproducts of full-fat dairy had, on average, a 46% lower risk of getting diabetes during the study period than those with lower levels. “I think these findings together with those from other studies do call for a change in the policy of recommending only low-fat dairy products,” says Mozaffarian. “There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy.” MORE: Ending the War on Fat Since full-fat dairy products contain more calories, many experts assumed avoiding it would lower diabetes risk. But studies have found that when people reduce how much fat they eat, they tend to replace it with sugar or carbohydrates, both of which can have worse effects on insulin and diabetes risk. In the current study, Mozaffarian adjusted Continue reading >>

Milk And Diabetes

Milk And Diabetes

Tweet Milk is a staple of our diets for many of us. Milk’s versatility means it can be used for a range of dairy uses such as cheese, butter and yoghurt as well as in baking. It is a good source of calcium and as well as energy. We take a brief look at the history of milk as well as examining its calorie content, carbohydrate content and a possible link with type 1 diabetes. For information on breast milk and diabetes see diabetes and breastfeeding. Milk history and processing Human consumption of milk from mammals, such as cows, sheep and goats, dates back several thousands of years. In the 1860s, milk consumption underwent a change when Louis Pasteur developed ‘pasteurisation’, a process of heating food and drink to kill off potentially harmful bacteria within. Homogenisation is another process used in the preparation of milk and involves separating out cream from the milk. In current times, cow’s milk is the most common source of milk in our diets. Milk and calorie content The calories in milk mainly come from carbohydrate, protein and fat. With skimmed milk, the vast majority of the fat is removed which tends to roughly half the number of calories. The number of calories in half a pint of milk varies from about 90 calories for skimmed milk to 190 calories for whole milk. For comparison, half a pint of sugary cola has around 120 calories. Milk and blood glucose levels Half a pint of milk has around 13g of carbohydrate. For comparison purposes, half a pint of sugary cola has around 30g of carbohydrate. If you are having a glass of milk, be aware that it will raise your blood glucose levels to some degree. Because of the fat content, whole milk will tend to raise blood glucose levels slightly less quickly than skimmed milk but bear in mind the extra calories. P Continue reading >>

Full-fat Or Low-fat Dairy: Which Is Best?

Full-fat Or Low-fat Dairy: Which Is Best?

Nutrition is an ever-changing field. One day, a certain food is good for you; the next day, not so much. It always seems like researchers and dietitians are changing their minds, leaving you to feel like no one knows what’s going on and that you might as well eat what you want (hey, we’re all going to die someday, anyway, right?). One of the recent nutrition “controversies” surrounds dairy foods, such as milk and yogurt. Most of us have either been told or have read that nonfat or low-fat dairy foods are better choices because they contain less saturated, or unhealthy, fat. And we dutifully pour skim or 1% milk on our cereal and opt for fat-free or low-fat yogurt when we shop. But a few studies have cast a shadow over that advice, hinting that low-fat dairy may not be all that it’s cut out to be, in terms of health benefits. These studies seem to point at the same conclusion: full-fat dairy may indeed be better than low-fat dairy. The case for full-fat dairy foods The new, 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans still push for low-fat dairy foods. But the following fairly recent studies are leading us to believe that full-fat may be the better option: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 2013: In this study, men aged 40 to 60 who had a high intake of dairy fat from butter, milk, or cream had a lower risk of central obesity; those who had a low intake of dairy fat had a higher risk. Diabetologia, 2014: Of almost 27,000 people, ages 45–74, those who ate eight servings of full-fat dairy foods (for example, milk, yogurt, cheese, cream, butter) lowered their risk for diabetes by nearly 25%. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2010: Of roughly 1,500 Australians who consumed dairy foods, those who consumed the most full-fat dairy (milk, yogurt, che Continue reading >>

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

A cold glass of milk invigorates your taste buds and gives you a boost of calcium, but people with diabetes need to be selective with their milk choices. Milk provides important nutrients for bone health, but some varieties contain large amounts of saturated fat and sugar, which should be limited in a diabetic diet. Video of the Day Milk on a Diabetic Diet According to ''Diabetes Forecast,'' a publication from the American Diabetes Association, diabetes increases your chance of developing bone fractures, a risk that increases as you age and lose bone mass. Calcium-rich foods, such as milk, help keep your bones strong and protect against osteoporosis, a serious bone loss that can lead to broken bones and decreased mobility. Since milk contains lactose, a type of sugar, it needs to be counted toward your daily carbohydrate totals. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition plan recommends 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, which includes one serving of dairy. Eight ounces of milk count as one dairy serving. Skim and Low-fat Milk Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, but you can control your risk by limiting your intake of saturated fat. One cup of whole milk provides 149 calories and 5 grams of saturated fat, but 1 cup of skim milk contains only 83 calories and 0.1 gram of saturated fat. If you prefer milk with a thicker texture than skim milk, try 1 percent milk, which has 102 calories and 1.5 grams of saturated fat per cup. All plain milk varieties provide about 12 grams of sugar per cup, but chocolate, strawberry and vanilla milk contain added sugar, so read the food label before purchasing. Benefits of Soy Milk If you do not like regular milk or are lactose intolerant, soy milk makes a healthy alternative. One cup of regular soy milk provides 131 Continue reading >>

Full-fat Milk 'may Drastically Reduce Risk Of Diabetes' - Study

Full-fat Milk 'may Drastically Reduce Risk Of Diabetes' - Study

Full-fat milk 'may drastically reduce risk of diabetes' - study People who regularlyconsume full-fat dairy products are less likely to develop diabetes than those who eat low-fat dairy products, according to new researchpublished in the journal Circulation. The 15-year study , in which researchers analysedthe blood of 3,333 adults aged between 30 and 75, found that people with higher levelsof dairy fat in their systems had as much as a 46 percent lower risk of diabetes thanthose who regularly consumed only low-fat foods. The research team at TuftsFriedman School of Nutrition Science & Policylooked at data from the Nurses Health Study of Health Professionals. There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy, said researcherDr. Dariush Mozaffarian. However, he cautioned that the research results were preliminary and shouldn't be taken as official guidance on diet:The implications arent yet to tell people definitely to drink only whole milk and avoid skim milk, he said. However, speaking to Time he said:In the absence of any evidence for the superior effects of low fat dairy, and some evidence that there may be better benefits of whole fat dairy products for diabetes, why are we recommending only low fat diary? We should be telling people to eat a variety of dairy and remove the recommendation about fat content. Dr. Susan Spratt, a diabetes specialist andassistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS: "I think we now understand there are healthy fats and unhealthy fats; healthy carbohydrates and less healthy carbohydrates. And fat can improve satiety and that could reduce total calorie intake. Continue reading >>

The Full-fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

The Full-fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

If you melt at the creaminess of full-fat yogurt, read on. A new study finds the dairy fats found in milk, yogurt and cheese may help protect against Type 2 diabetes. The research, published in the journal Circulation, included 3,333 adults. Beginning in the late 1980s, researchers took blood samples from the participants and measured circulating levels of biomarkers of dairy fat in their blood. Then, over the next two decades, the researchers tracked who among the participants developed diabetes. "People who had the most dairy fat in their diet had about a 50 percent lower risk of diabetes" compared with people who consumed the least dairy fat, says Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, who is also an author of the study. The study does not prove a cause and effect, but it builds on a body of evidence suggesting that dairy fat may have protective effects, both in cutting the risk of diabetes and in helping people control body weight. "For a long time we've had this notion that saturated fat [the kind found in dairy products] is always bad for you," says Mark DeBoer, a pediatrician at the University of Virginia. But this assumption is being questioned. As we've previously reported, DeBoer has studied the connection between dairy fat and children's body weight. And he published a surprising finding. "It appears that children who have a higher intake of whole milk or 2 percent milk gain less weight over time" compared with kids who consume skim or nonfat dairy products, explains DeBoer. And there's some evidence that dairy fat may help adults manage weight as well. As we've reported, researchers in Sweden found that middle-aged men who consumed high-fat milk, butter and cream were significantly less likely to Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Dairy Discussion: Low-fat Vs. Full-fat

The Diabetic Dairy Discussion: Low-fat Vs. Full-fat

A high-fat diet has been thought to contribute to weight gain and the development of heart disease and diabetes. However, new research suggests high-fat dairy products may actually reduce the risk of diabetes. When it comes to the management of diabetes, the control of blood sugar is top priority. Uncontrolled blood sugars can ultimately result into complications and compromise body organs. In addition, a high-fat diet is often thought to contribute to weight gain and the development of heart disease and diabetes. Surprisingly, new research suggests high-fat dairy products may actually reduce the risk of diabetes. Low-Fat Versus Full-Fat First off, it is important to get a better grasp on the nutritional makeup of dairy products. The table below represents the variations between macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein, and fat) in cow's milk. When deciphering through the numbers, it is noteworthy to notice the grams of both carbohydrate and protein stays consistent despite the varying milk type. When it really comes down to it, the fat and calorie content individualizes cow's milk. It seems only logical the intake of skim or low-fat milk should replace whole milk to reduce calories and fat, ultimately reducing the potential for weight gain and diabetes risk. However, new research seems to suggest otherwise. Can High-Fat Actually Reduce the Risk of Diabetes? Not long ago, fat was commonly feared among the general population. Its intake was an associated contributor to weight gain and the development of heart disease and diabetes. Although a high intake of fat can do so, the body needs fat from healthful sources and in moderation. New research has shined the light on high-fat dairy products fitting into a healthy diet. The study, conducted by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian and his Continue reading >>

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

The relationship between milk product consumption and type 2 diabetes has been examined in several meta-analyses. Evidence to date suggests that milk product consumption is associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Highlights Milk product consumption is associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes; Total dairy and low-fat milk products are largely associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes; High-fat dairy/dairy fat is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Fermented dairy, including cheese and yogurt, is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; There appears to be an inverse dose-response relationship between yogurt and cheese and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Synopsis Several meta-analyses of numerous prospective cohort studies have examined the role of milk products in the development of type 2 diabetes. The totality of the evidence to date suggests that there is an inverse association between milk product consumption, including specific milk products such as yogurt and cheese, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Evidence A meta-analysis published in 2014 investigated the association between the consumption of different types of dairy products and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The analysis consisted of data from 14 prospective cohort studies (N = 459,790), including the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II.1 Total, high-fat and low-fat dairy intake were not associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Yogurt consumption (both plain and flavoured) was associated with an 18% decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (pooled relative risk of 0.82 per one serving of yogurt/day, 95% CI: Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

Dairy And Diabetes

Dairy And Diabetes

All of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need some dairy products (or non-dairy alternatives like soya products) such as milk, cheese and yogurt every day. These all contain proteins and vitamins and are an important source of calcium, which help to keep your bones and teeth strong. Some dairy foods, however, can be high in fat and saturated fat, so choose lower-fat alternatives where you can. Adults and older children who consume too much fat may find they gain weight and too much saturated fat can cause your cholesterol levels to rise, which increases your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, diabetes increases your risk of having CVD, so it pays to opt for the lower-fat options to help manage your risk. How much per day? Aim for 3 portions. What's a portion? One portion equals: 190ml (⅓ pint ) milk a small pot of yogurt 2 tbsp cottage cheese a matchbox-sized portion of cheese (30g) How to make healthy dairy choices Milk Switching to lower-fat milk, such as semi-skimmed milk (green top) from whole milk (blue top), which contains the most fat, is a good start. To make even more of a difference, try 1 per cent fat milk (orange top) or even better skimmed milk (red top). Lower-fat milks have all the goodness of whole milk, including calcium, all you lose is the fat. This table shows the savings you could make. The figures are for 100ml but bear in mind a pint is 568ml, which many of us consume each day on cereal and in cups of tea and coffee. It shows how the savings can really add up. Milk Kcal /100ml Fat /100ml Saturated fat /100ml Carbohydrate /100ml Of which sugars /100ml Salt /100ml Whole 64 3.6 2.3 4.7 4.7 0.1 Semi-skimmed 50 1.8 1.1 4.8 4.8 0.1 1% fat 43 1 0.7 4.9 4.9 0.1 Skimmed 35 0.1 < 0.1 5 5 0.1 To help you see if your favourite milk or c Continue reading >>

Bring On The Full-fat Dairy? Not So Fast

Bring On The Full-fat Dairy? Not So Fast

Full-fat dairy was linked with reduced risk of diabetes, but experts say it's not a green light to load up on milk, cheese and butter. With commentary by researcher Frank Hu, MD, MPH, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology, Harvard Medical School and T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The debate about high-fat versus low-fat dairy foods is simmering again. In the latest study, adults who consumed more full-fat dairy products(as reflected by higher levels of certain fatty acids in their bloodsamples) had a lower risk of getting type 2 diabetes over a long-term follow-up. In some press reports, that finding was translated to mean it's time to switch to whole-fat dairy foods, despite current dietary guidelines that suggest choosing low-fat or non-fat dairy as part of a healthy diet.1 Not so fast, says Frank Hu, MD, PhD, MPH, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health and a study coauthor. "I wouldn't use this research to give a green light for people to drink whole milk [or other high-fat products]," he says. "This is a very preliminary result." Dr. Hu and his colleagues followed more than 3,300 adults, ages 30 to 75, enrolled in two different long-term studies. One, the Nurses' Health Study, began in 1989. The other, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, began in 1993. The researchers tracked the men and women through 2010. During that time, 277 new cases of diabetes were diagnosed. The researchers then looked at blood samples taken at the start of the studies, measuring circulating levels of fatty acid biomarkers found in high-fat dairy foods.The higher these biomarkers, the lower the risk of getting diabetes, with the risk reduction ranging from 43 to 52%. The link held after adjusting fo Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

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