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Full Fat Ice Cream Gestational Diabetes

How Should I Change My Diet If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

How Should I Change My Diet If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

How should I change my diet if I have gestational diabetes? Melissa Joy Dobbins on behalf of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics If you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you should see a registered dietitian to help you create a meal plan tailored to your needs. Ask your doctor for a referral to a dietitian or visit www.eatright.org to find a dietitian in your area. There are some general guidelines that you can follow before seeing a dietitian that can help you get started on better blood glucose control: 1. Eat 3 meals and 3 snacks a day and get at least 175 grams of carbohydrate each day for baby's growth and development. 2. Avoid all concentrated sweets and sugars, including sweet beverages such as juice and regular soda. 3. Be particularly mindful of the amount and type of carbohydrate you eat at breakfast since the hormones during pregnancy tend to make blood glucose levels rise at this time of day. Some people do well by limiting carbohydrates to 15-30 grams at breakfast, and avoiding fruit and cereal with milk at this meal. 4. Also pay special attention to what type of bedtime snack you choose. It is best to get about 30 grams of carbohydrate, plus protein AND fat at this snack, such as 2/3 cup ice cream, whole grain bread with peanut butter, or whole grain crackers with cheese. 5. Individual needs will vary, and your dietitian can help determine the best calorie and carbohydrate levels for you based on your weight and what trimester you are in. However, many people can benefit from aiming for about 20-30 grams of carbohydrate at snacks, about 45 grams of carbohdrate at lunch and about 45-60 grams of carbohdrate at dinner. Some people need to get a little less or a little more, so it's important to determine what works best for your individual needs. Over Continue reading >>

Questions About Gestational Diabetes

Questions About Gestational Diabetes

Hi there. I'm kind of curious about some of your rules - I also have GD and have to test 4 times a day and have to count carbs, but I am allowed fruit and sugar if it fits into my plan. Also, nothing about dairy was ever mentioned to me. In fact, my dietitian recommended I eat a cup of full fat ice cream every night before bed. I'm wondering why they are being so strict with you. I was worried about losing weight also. The first week I lost a pound but I put it back on the second week. Since then I have gained a pound a week and my doctor is happy with that. I've been doing the diet for going on 2 months. If you were normal weight and not eating out of control, I don't think losing weight will be an issue. You just might gain slower. I have found that I have to eat MORE than I want to. Pregnancy has killed my appetite and I have lost 14 pounds overall. I gained 5 with the first week of GD, but that was while making myself actually sick from forcing so much food into me to get 60g of carbs at every meal, but those 5 pounds were gone two weeks later. Then I was told I could go down to 45g, which has been better. No restrictions on sugar, fat, etc. Just looking at carbs. You get 60 carbs at every meal??I only get 45, and that's max and seems to raise my blood sugar to over the recommended limit of 135 after a meal. Hmm...sounds like different doctors are allowing different things- less of a science and more of an opinion? Yeah, it was really shocking for me to find out just how much I need to eat! My first meal of the day needs to be 15-30 though, and I've found that the lower the better since that's my body's worst time, it seems. For my second meal today I had 49g and my number about 40 minutes after eating was only 96 (we had to go somewhere and I wanted to see how it Continue reading >>

Ice Cream Trick! - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Ice Cream Trick! - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I am new here and I'm reading that a lot of women are eating ice cream before bed to keep their fasting number down. Can someone give me a little more detail? How much ice cream? What kind? How late at night do you eat it? I've been eating pretty well and can't get my morning blood sugar below 104. Any tips would be appreciated! Lately I've been eating neopolitan ice cream at night, usually a cup or so as it doesn't hurt my fasting number. I'll eat it around 8-9pm, take my fasting number anywhere from 4-7 hrs later (my sleep is really messed up, so hard to find consistency). You might have to experiment a bit. If your numbers are high no matter what you do then it might be an indicator that you'll need insulin. I've had carb smart ice cream bars (just 1) paired with some protein like special k protein bites or string cheese. I've also had the weight watchers ice cream bars. I normally have my snack around 9 9:30pm and test exactly 10 hours later and my numbers are below 90. I've been wondering about this too! Not bc my fasting is high but bc I really want ice cream! I just had half a cup of bryers immediately after dinner. Staying within my allotted dinner carbs. Will update in 2 hours! Wish me luck. I had ice cream as my snack with my first GD pregnancy and never had a high fasting number. This time around, i weigh more so am trying to minimize weight gain so I switched to yogurt. It's siggi's brand. 14 or so grams of carbs and 15 grams of protein. My fasting has been around 80 every time I've eaten it. I ate full fat ice cream and mixed in peanut butter almost every night when I was pregnant. I started with 1/2 cup serving, but then got more relaxed about the amount still with good numbers! The only way you'll know if it works is to try it! I also can't get my fastin Continue reading >>

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Snacks are a really important part of the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet for several reasons. Simply put, eating regularly will generally help keep your glucose levels tracking smoother. And including a snack between your meals also makes it less likely that you’ll get super hungry. Have you noticed that once you’re hungry it’s much harder to try to control your food intake? The key to a successful GDM diet is ensuring that you’re having a consistent amount of carbs. Snacks are also a good time to fit in your fruit and dairy requirements that you may no longer be able to eat together with your main meal. And often small and frequent intake also helps with other common problems in pregnancy such as nausea and heartburn/reflux. If you’re working or at home with little kids or just aren’t used to including mid-meal snacks, it’s often hard to adjust to this. So planning and preparation is the key! When you’re out and about you’ll probably find it challenging to find something that is both the right amount of carbs and not too high in fat, but also nutritious. So it pays to have a selection of suitable options on hand and variety will help too. I’ve put together this extensive list of suggestions. Your dietitian can help you work out whether you should eat some of these in combination to ensure you’re eating the recommended amounts both in terms of carbohydrate amount but also overall food group and nutrient amounts. Please note, the majority of these products are Australian. Dairy 1 carb snacks (where 1 carbohydrate serve = 15 grams of total carbohydrate) (Always check the product’s nutritional panel for exact info) Cup of low fat/soy milk (if you’d like s Continue reading >>

Ice Cream: Okay For Diabetics?

Ice Cream: Okay For Diabetics?

Expert Q&A I just learned that I am diabetic. Can I still eat ice cream? -Monica from Georgia Even though it is okay for diabetics to eat sweets such as ice cream, I always stress caution, as these foods are usually very high in calories and can wreak havoc on your blood glucose control. Moreover, they add empty calories to your diet and provide little nutritional benefit. With that said, if you decide to eat sugar or sweets, do so carefully. Do not merely add them, plan for them. The best way to do so is by first understanding how your blood sugar levels react to certain sweets. It is also a good idea to take your blood sugars before and after eating them. If you want to have ice cream for dessert, wait 2 hours after dinner, during which time you can go for a walk. Then, check your blood sugars. Take the right amount of insulin or oral medication, and check your blood glucose 2 hours later. If your blood glucose is below 160mg/dl, you body should be able to tolerate a small dessert. Examine the nutritional facts on the carton, focusing on the carbohydrate count. You should aim for no more than 30 grams of carbs, which is usually equal to one-half cup. It is easy to ingest far too many carbohydrates and calories when eating sweets. If you do eat foods that contain sugar, exercise a bit more than you usually do. This will help you burn off the extra calories and decrease the rise in blood sugars. In addition, many sugar-containing foods like ice cream and cookies are high in fat, so seek out low-fat, low-carb options. It may be a good idea to work with an experienced dietitian or diabetes educator to develop a meal plan that is both satisfying and keeps your blood sugars in check. Have a question for our Experts? Send it in! Continue reading >>

Ice Cream, Ice Lollies & Frozen Yoghurt

Ice Cream, Ice Lollies & Frozen Yoghurt

With the first glimpses of some sunshine last weekend, we've seen a few ladies asking about ice cream & ice lollies in our Facebook support group and so whilst this was on my list of posts coming soon, I've brought it forward for all you eager ladies that are craving ice cream and let's face it, who cares what the weather is doing, we love ice cream! So can we eat ice cream, ice lollies and frozen yoghurt with gestational diabetes? Here we'll share hints & tips and our best finds... Diabetic & sugar free ice cream Diabetic or sugar free ice cream is often the first thing ladies turn to with gestational diabetes. There are lots of these 'diabetic' ice creams on the market, some like Frank's are widely available in many supermarkets and it's common to see diabetic ice creams in independent ice cream parlours. These ice creams are fine to eat with gestational diabetes but you shouldn't have to pay more for these 'diabetic' products and should be aware of the ingredients used. Diabetic ice creams often contain high amounts of artificial sweeteners (sometimes listed as polyols or sugar alcohols) which may cause gastric upsets, bloating, cramps, wind and diarrhoea. Sorbitol and mannitol can be the main culprit for causing gastric upset, but some people struggle with other sweeteners causing gastric upsets too. Natural sweeteners are often better tolerated than artificial. Diabetic ice creams can sometimes have a funny after taste or texture too, so whilst they shouldn't send your blood sugar levels soaring, you may find alternatives which suit you better. That said, sometimes it's just enough to take the ice cream craving away when you're walking along the beach! 99, Mr Whippy & Mcfluffy (soft serve ice cream) It is up to you to decide if you think it is safe to eat this type Continue reading >>

Frozen Yogurt Vs. Ice Cream…what Does It All Mean For Diabetics?

Frozen Yogurt Vs. Ice Cream…what Does It All Mean For Diabetics?

I don’t think one summer goes by without hearing someone say “well, you know frozen yogurt is better for you anyways.” Being the dietitian diabetic that I am, I know in the back of my mind there is an exception to that statement, but I am usually too busy stuffing my face with ice cream to retaliate. I decided it would be helpful to give a breakdown of the difference between frozen yogurt, ice cream, and regular soft serve. There are pros and cons to point out about this dairy family of creamy-melty goodness, and even more importantly are the nutrition facts to point out that make a BIG difference for those of us burning the gears of our insulin pumps each and every summer as we indulge in these treats. Ice cream is made with different kinds of dairy, either cream or milk. While most frozen yogurt is made with milk instead of cream, keep in mind that not all kinds are made from fat-free milk. The calories and fat content will automatically be higher if either is made with whole-fat cream or whole-fat milk. Ice cream is made from milk fat, milk solids, sweeteners (sugar or artificial ones), flavorings, stabilizers and water. Frozen yogurt usually contains yogurt culture, milk solids and milk fat, gelatin, corn syrup and other flavorings. Ooh yum, bet you didn’t know there was corn syrup in frozen yogurt? Isn’t that fantastic for diabetics? (insert sarcastic face here). Is Frozen yogurt healthier? Well, it depends on which kinds of frozen yogurt you are comparing to which kind of ice cream. There are low-fat, fat-free, and sugar-free versions of both. Don’t just assume because you are eating frozen yogurt that it is ‘healthier for you’. While the non-fat versions are wonderful in that they don’t add unwanted fat calories to your waist line, they are so h Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Diet: Taking Carbs From A Pregnant Lady

The Gestational Diabetes Diet: Taking Carbs From A Pregnant Lady

When I decided, at age 40, that I wanted to try to have a child, I knew I faced a few elevated risks over younger women: first and foremost, I might not be able to conceive at all. I mentally prepared myself—as much as I could, anyway—for that and other possibilities, including the higher risk of the baby having a genetic defect. So far I’ve been fortunate. The one risk I hadn’t given much thought to—the higher chance of developing gestational diabetes—is the only one that has been a factor in my pregnancy. I’m fairly healthy, I have no history of diabetes in my family, and I try to eat well—lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and few highly processed junk foods. But older pregnant women—and that means even women as young as in their late 20s, believe it or not—can have a harder time regulating insulin, leading to increased blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes, if not controlled through diet and exercise, can cause high-birth-weight babies and potentially lead to delivery complications, as well as increasing the risk that the child will develop obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. For the mother, there’s also the risk of high blood pressure and a higher likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. I haven’t been diagnosed with gestational diabetes so far. But because my blood sugar was a little high during my early glucose tolerance test (this is given to all pregnant women around 28 weeks, but women of my age are also sometimes tested earlier), I was advised to exercise more frequently and follow a low-carbohydrate diet, the same advice given to those with the diagnosis. The last thing a pasta-loving pregnant lady with a sweet tooth wants to hear is that she should cut out carbs. I have always been skeptical of the low-carb Continue reading >>

Ten Things Gestational Diabetes Has Taught Me

Ten Things Gestational Diabetes Has Taught Me

Since being diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 29 weeks pregnant I have learnt so much! All of us can learn how to better manage our blood sugar levels giving us more energy, curbing cravings and reducing overeating. Here are some of the key things I’ve discovered, which I hope you will benefit from as well; Nutrition 1. Total carbohydrate is more important than sugar on a diabetic diet. Initially when I made changes I just thought I needed to cut out any sweet treats; no cake, chocolate, milo, ice cream or dessert. I didn't worry so much about the healthy complex carbohydrates I was having. What I learnt was that it is the total carbohydrate in something that is going to have the impact. While having brown rice, wholemeal pasta, grainy bread or quinoa are all good things in terms of their nourishment, fibre and the satiety factor that they bring. Having too much in one serving still means it is converted to glucose in the blood and will still spike your blood sugar levels as the body is so inefficient in processing it all. I have become much more aware of the "total carbohydrate per serving" part of the label which to be honest I never paid any attention to before. I now look at the total carbohydrates per serving and check how much a serving size really is and then mentally work out how much I can have at any given meal. The dieticians taught us to think in what they call 'exchanges' similar to servings. One piece of bread roughly equals one exchange. They recommend having; • 2 - 4 at breakfast, lunch and dinner and • 1 - 2 in snacks mid morning, mid afternoon and possibly evening. That's a total of 9-18 exchanges (piece of bread equivalents) per day. I find that I need to stick to about 2.5 - 3 per meal and about 1.5 per snack to keep me within a good range Continue reading >>

Oh Joy! : Archives

Oh Joy! : Archives

I'm not gonna lie guys, being pregnant can be really unfun. I do like being pregnant most of the time...I love the feeling of a growing baby inside your belly, people are really extra nice to you, Bob will never say no to my request for a back massage, and of course, the prize you get at the end is awesome. I like being pregnant maybe 75% of the time, but the other 25% of the time, it just kind of sucks. I run out of breath really quickly, I have trouble sleeping, I've peed in my pants more times than I'd like to admit, and my body eventually just can't keep up. When I was pregnant with Ruby, I developed gallstones and had to have my gallbladder removed soon after she was born. And yesterday, I found out that I have gestational diabetes. Which means little to no carbs and no sugar until this baby comes out. To a person whose day is based around what I'll have for dessert, it was a pretty sad thing to hear. So, here I am all-of-a-sudden having to go on a diet, while pregnantthe one time your body wants just a little bit more to eat and needs a little bit more energy to get you through the day. Yes, I am super bummed. But I know it's for my own health and the health of our baby and that I have to get on track with this new plan even if it wasn't part of the old plan. So, friends, if you have any amazing protein-based, veggie-based food or recipe suggestions for me, I am all ears. Or if you've had gestational diabetes before and have any tips for me, I need all the help I can get! {Photo by Bob Cho. I tried to find a photo of me with a "thumbs down" but had no luck.} Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Sweets You Can Have

Gestational Diabetes: Sweets You Can Have

Having gestational diabetes during your pregnancy is not a fun thing! You already have all the worries of a pregnancy and stressing out about getting things ready for the baby, now you have to deal with this too? If you have gestional diabetes, I want to share my story with you as well as giving you some tips on how to sneak in some good sweets without breaking the rules! When I was pregnant with my second baby, I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at about 28 weeks. I was not happy when this day came because it was the start of three months of watching your health very closely. Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy in a person who did not have diabetes before pregnancy. The pancreas does not produce enough insulin to combat the glucose in your body. You can ask your doctor about the science behind it, I just want to share what I had to go through and let you know what to look out for. For the next three months, everyday, I had to test myself on what my blood sugar levels were 7 times a day: before and after each meal and before bedtime snack. Yes, I had to prick my finger and draw blood 7 times a day. On top of that, I had to get checked every two weeks from the gestional diabetes clinic. I had to record all my blood sugar levels, what insulin I had taken, and record all the food I ate, six times a day. My days seem to be a drag and I was not enjoying myself! The only way I can feel any remote happiness in this process was finding out what sweets I can have. SWEET foods like ice cream, chocolate, and desserts! I was craving sweets like crazy, like with both pregnancies but this one was worse since I wasn’t allowed to have any sweets. During one of my clinic visits, I asked the dietitian what I can do about my cravings for chocol Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

The following article regarding gestational diabetes is for informational purposes only and cannot be considered as professional advice. If you have any concerns or questions regarding gestational diabetes, please consult your obstetrician . Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition that develops during pregnancy when the body is not able to make enough insulin. The lack of insulin causes the blood glucose (also called blood sugar) level to become higher than normal. Gestational diabetes affects between 3 and 5 percent of women during pregnancy. It is important to recognise and treat gestational diabetes as soon as possible to minimise the risk of complications in the baby. In addition, it is important for women with a history of gestational diabetes to be tested for diabetes after pregnancy because of an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the years following delivery. Complications of gestational diabetes can include: Having a large baby (weighing more than 9 lbs or 4.1 kg) Injury to the mother or infant during delivery An increased chance of needing a caesarean delivery Screening for gestational diabetes is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. However, screening may be done earlier in the pregnancy if you have risk factors for gestational diabetes, such as: A history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Gestational diabetes is diagnosed if you have two or more blood sugar values above the following levels: If you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you will need to make changes in what you eat, and you will need to learn to check your blood sugar level. In some cases, you will also need to learn how to give yourself insulin injections. The goal of treatment for gestational diabetes is to reduce the risk that the bab Continue reading >>

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/Primal for My Gestational Diabetes Ive been interested in Paleolithic (or paleo) diets for ages, but it always seemed difficult to give up my favorite croissants and ciabatta bread and fully embrace the lifestyle. Plus, I have a wheat-addicted daughter and husband to deal with.Ive tried removing wheat from the house from time to time, but it usually results in some sort of mutiny and my dear hubby making panicked runs to Costco for massive packs of apple turnovers. I found him hiding some in his car last year and decided I may have been a wee bit extreme in my war on gluten. However, I got a wake up call last year when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD) fairly early on in my recent pregnancy with our twins. Gestational diabetes is much more common with twin pregnancies, but the diagnosis upset me. It seemed that getting a diagnosis of gestational diabetes triggered the five stages of grief! My first step was definitely denial: How could I possibly have gestational diabetes? I eat very healthy foods overall (well at least according to conventional holistic nutrition)plenty of healthy whole grains, beans, legumes, organic vegetables, fruit, grass-fed beef, and organic chicken. Oh, and wild salmon of courseI do live in the Pacific Northwest!I also love my dark chocolate , but Im more likely to make glucomannan pudding than cupcakes. (Okay, sometimes we have cupcakes.) I was tested for gestational diabetes earlier in my pregnancy than most because of my symptoms (hyperemesis gravidarum, constant thirst, and needing to pee even more than the average pregnant woman) and the high risk of GD with twins. My test results were marginal, and it was still early, so, convinced this was all a giant mistake, I started monitoring my blood sugars four times Continue reading >>

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