diabetestalk.net

Full Fat Dairy Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

Why High-fat Vs. Low-fat Dairy May Be Better Suited For Those With Diabetes, Obesity, And Cardiovascular Disease

Why High-fat Vs. Low-fat Dairy May Be Better Suited For Those With Diabetes, Obesity, And Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Obesity and the High-Fat, Low-Fat Dairy Debate Penny Brooks is a Registered Dietitian, who at the age of 12 was diagnosed with prediabetes, which she reversed within a year. Based on her personal experience and expertise in nutrition, she discusses the health benefits of the full fat dairy option in the context of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Since the 1940s the concept of a low-fat diet has been promoted to decrease ones risk of or improve weight loss and cardiovascular disease. This belief has been reflected in American consumer beverage trends especially among adults 60 years of age and older. It was noted that full-fat dairy was being exchanged for lower fat options such as low-fat and skim milk over the past several years. Obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease are interrelated conditions through consistently high insulin levels With nutrition science as a dynamic and constantly evolving discipline, emerging evidence now is debunking fat as being the progenitor of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in the diet where the culprit was actually discovered to be sugar and refined carbohydrates. As a result, the theory of low-fat diets for prevention and treatment of these conditions has been the center of much criticism recently. Research conducted using high-fat low-carbohydrate diets demonstrate promise and positive outcomes to assist in preventing and managing these conditions more effectively that align with current and updated nutrition science. Obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease are interrelated conditions mainly through their common denominator: high and consistently stimulated levels of insulin. So what foods affect insulin the most? Fat (from animals or plants): a nutrient that he Continue reading >>

Full Fat Milk Improves Cholesterol Levels

Full Fat Milk Improves Cholesterol Levels

Full fat milk improves cholesterol levels Full fat milk improves cholesterol levels Low zinc levels could be associated with prediabetes risk 09 November 2017 A three-week crossover study shows that drinking full fat, whole milk led to improved cholesterol levels compared to drinking skimmed milk. For decades, skimmed and semi-skimmed milk has been advised as a way of reducing weight and helping to prevent heart disease. However, these guidelines were introduced before rigorous research was carried out to see if the theory was true. In recent years, research has been carried out to test whether eating low fat has scientific validity. So far, the research suggests that full fat dairy is no worse than low fat dairy and may be healthier. Previous studies have shown full fat dairy to be associated with lower risks of type 2 diabetes , for example. In the new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen tested the effects of having 500ml per day of either skimmed milk or whole milk for three weeks and then repeating the test with the other type of milk . The study was randomised so that some participants started with skimmed milk whereas others started with the whole milk first. Cholesterol tests were taken to measure how the different types of milk affected blood lipids such as LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. 18 healthy adults took part in the study and all but one completed it. The results of the study showed that LDL cholesterol did not differ significantly between the two types of milk. However, whole milk was shown to increase the level of HDL cholesterol which reflects a healthier effect on cholesterol levels . The findings provide more evidence that low fat foods are not advantageous and that full fat dairy is likely to be the healthier choice. For up to Continue reading >>

Are Full-fat Dairy Foods Better For You After All?

Are Full-fat Dairy Foods Better For You After All?

Can we go back to putting whole milk in our coffee and slurping down real ice cream? Two recent studies suggest eating full-fat dairy foods instead of their thinner tasting, low-fat or non-fat counterparts may help cut the risk for diabetes and obesity. But the research is still early, experts told CBS News. Tufts researchers report in the journal Circulation that people who consumed full-fat dairy products had as much as a 46 percent lower risk of developing diabetes over the course of the 15-year study compared with people who opted for skim milk, low-fat yogurt and low-fat cheese. The research was based on an analysis of blood test results showing biomarkers of full-fat dairy consumption. A second study of more than 18,000 middle-age women who were part of the Women's Health Study -- and normal weight, free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes at the start of the research -- found that those who ate more high-fat dairy had an 8 percent lower chance of going on to become obese over time compared to those who ate less. No association was observed with low-fat dairy product intake. "We saw less weight gain for higher total dairy and high-fat dairy intake and also a lower risk of becoming overweight and obese in those who consumed more high-fat dairy," said study author Susanne Rautiainen, a research fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend keeping saturated fat consumption to less than 10 percent of calories per day. A latte made with one cup of whole milk, for example, contains 4.6 grams of saturated fat -- almost a quarter of the daily total. Changing the dietary guidelines might be premature at this point, but they should be re-evaluated, nutrition experts said. "I am conservative ab Continue reading >>

Full-fat Or Low-fat Dairy: Which Is Best?

Full-fat Or Low-fat Dairy: Which Is Best?

Nutrition is an ever-changing field. One day, a certain food is good for you; the next day, not so much. It always seems like researchers and dietitians are changing their minds, leaving you to feel like no one knows what’s going on and that you might as well eat what you want (hey, we’re all going to die someday, anyway, right?). One of the recent nutrition “controversies” surrounds dairy foods, such as milk and yogurt. Most of us have either been told or have read that nonfat or low-fat dairy foods are better choices because they contain less saturated, or unhealthy, fat. And we dutifully pour skim or 1% milk on our cereal and opt for fat-free or low-fat yogurt when we shop. But a few studies have cast a shadow over that advice, hinting that low-fat dairy may not be all that it’s cut out to be, in terms of health benefits. These studies seem to point at the same conclusion: full-fat dairy may indeed be better than low-fat dairy. The case for full-fat dairy foods The new, 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans still push for low-fat dairy foods. But the following fairly recent studies are leading us to believe that full-fat may be the better option: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 2013: In this study, men aged 40 to 60 who had a high intake of dairy fat from butter, milk, or cream had a lower risk of central obesity; those who had a low intake of dairy fat had a higher risk. Diabetologia, 2014: Of almost 27,000 people, ages 45–74, those who ate eight servings of full-fat dairy foods (for example, milk, yogurt, cheese, cream, butter) lowered their risk for diabetes by nearly 25%. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2010: Of roughly 1,500 Australians who consumed dairy foods, those who consumed the most full-fat dairy (milk, yogurt, che Continue reading >>

Full-fat Dairy Vs Low-fat Dairy - Which Is Better? - Nutrition Advance

Full-fat Dairy Vs Low-fat Dairy - Which Is Better? - Nutrition Advance

Whole Milk vs. Low Fat Milk: Which is Better? Low-fat milk has long been a smart choice for the health crowd. For years all you had to do was stick a low-fat sticker on food and people would swear by it as a healthy product. Low-fat dairy was king, but things are changing now. There has been a reversal in the fortunes of whole milk. Following years of demonization, it is finally becoming trendy again. This article will look at the differences between full-fat milk and low-fat milk in more detail. Whole milk quite simply means that the milk has not had any nutrient removed. People often call it full fat, but in reality, it has a relatively small percentage of fat. In the US, whole milk has a fat content of only 3.25% ( 1 ). Whole milk is much higher in fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) than skim milk. It is also the kind that your grandparents likely drank every day and their ancestors too. After all, we used to drink milk raw, collected straight from a local animal. There were no huge commercial milk processing factories back in those days. Some people believe whole milk to be undesirable. They question why we would drink full-fat milk when skim milk is freely available; a choice that is lower in calories and fat. US Dietary Guidelines:Aim for three servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy per day. ( 2 ) UK Eatwell Guide: Choose lower fat dairy. ( 3 ) American Diabetes Association:Choose lower-fat dairy products. The best choices of dairy product are fat-free or low-fat. ( 4 ) American Heart Association: Select fat-free and low-fat dairy products. ( 5 ) New Zealand Ministry of Health:Eat some milk and milk products, mostly low-fat or fat-free. ( 6 ) Key Point: Whole milk is the closest thing we have to unadulterated natural milk, but most national health organizations adv Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dairy

Diabetes And Dairy

When it comes to the whole dairy group of foods, it can also be another area you can get stuck if you've got diabetes. Do I eat low fat? Is it okay to eat cheese? And is milk okay? Well, hopefully by the time you're done reading this you'll have a whole new perspective on diabetes and dairy. Low Fat vs. High Fat Compared We've all been so used to choosing low fat options but let's look at some low fat yogurt. Full fat Greek yogurt has far less carbohydrates/ sugar than a low fat option, coming in at around 6 g per serve. As a diabetic, one of the most important things for lowering blood sugar and A1C levels is monitoring carbohydrate intake, so don't exclude monitoring (some) dairy from this list (see more on this below). The Research on Diabetes And Dairy In the past 12 months we have seen new science emerge showing that full fat products are not an issue. As Time magazine clearly puts it: “A recent review published in the European Journal of Nutrition of the existing research on dairy fat came to some surprising conclusions: People who eat full-fat dairy are no more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes than people who stick to low-fat dairy. When it comes to weight gain, full-fat dairy may actually be better for you, the review found.” Keeping fatty red meats in lower proportion is a good idea, but full fat dairy is better than low fat. Quoted from Independent, Dr Ulrika Ericson, from Lund University, Sweden said: “Those who ate the most high-fat dairy products had a 23 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate the least.” Ericson's study looked at almost 27,000 people to see what dietary fat food sources might lead to increased rates of type 2 diabetes. What they found was that those consuming more high-fat da Continue reading >>

Full-fat Milk 'may Drastically Reduce Risk Of Diabetes' - Study

Full-fat Milk 'may Drastically Reduce Risk Of Diabetes' - Study

Full-fat milk 'may drastically reduce risk of diabetes' - study People who regularlyconsume full-fat dairy products are less likely to develop diabetes than those who eat low-fat dairy products, according to new researchpublished in the journal Circulation. The 15-year study , in which researchers analysedthe blood of 3,333 adults aged between 30 and 75, found that people with higher levelsof dairy fat in their systems had as much as a 46 percent lower risk of diabetes thanthose who regularly consumed only low-fat foods. The research team at TuftsFriedman School of Nutrition Science & Policylooked at data from the Nurses Health Study of Health Professionals. There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy, said researcherDr. Dariush Mozaffarian. However, he cautioned that the research results were preliminary and shouldn't be taken as official guidance on diet:The implications arent yet to tell people definitely to drink only whole milk and avoid skim milk, he said. However, speaking to Time he said:In the absence of any evidence for the superior effects of low fat dairy, and some evidence that there may be better benefits of whole fat dairy products for diabetes, why are we recommending only low fat diary? We should be telling people to eat a variety of dairy and remove the recommendation about fat content. Dr. Susan Spratt, a diabetes specialist andassistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS: "I think we now understand there are healthy fats and unhealthy fats; healthy carbohydrates and less healthy carbohydrates. And fat can improve satiety and that could reduce total calorie intake. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Whole Milk For those with diabetes, a diet high in saturated fat can worsen insulin resistance. Keep whole milk out of the fridge, and pick up 1% (low-fat) or skim (non-fat) milk instead. Also, try your best to avoid other whole-milk dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, regular cheese and cream cheese; instead, choose their reduced-fat counterparts whenever possible Previous Next More Photos Bacon White Bread Continue reading >>

The Full-fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

The Full-fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

If you melt at the creaminess of full-fat yogurt, read on. A new study finds the dairy fats found in milk, yogurt and cheese may help protect against Type 2 diabetes. The research, published in the journal Circulation, included 3,333 adults. Beginning in the late 1980s, researchers took blood samples from the participants and measured circulating levels of biomarkers of dairy fat in their blood. Then, over the next two decades, the researchers tracked who among the participants developed diabetes. "People who had the most dairy fat in their diet had about a 50 percent lower risk of diabetes" compared with people who consumed the least dairy fat, says Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, who is also an author of the study. The study does not prove a cause and effect, but it builds on a body of evidence suggesting that dairy fat may have protective effects, both in cutting the risk of diabetes and in helping people control body weight. "For a long time we've had this notion that saturated fat [the kind found in dairy products] is always bad for you," says Mark DeBoer, a pediatrician at the University of Virginia. But this assumption is being questioned. As we've previously reported, DeBoer has studied the connection between dairy fat and children's body weight. And he published a surprising finding. "It appears that children who have a higher intake of whole milk or 2 percent milk gain less weight over time" compared with kids who consume skim or nonfat dairy products, explains DeBoer. And there's some evidence that dairy fat may help adults manage weight as well. As we've reported, researchers in Sweden found that middle-aged men who consumed high-fat milk, butter and cream were significantly less likely to Continue reading >>

Full-fat Dairy Linked To Lower Risk For Diabetes

Full-fat Dairy Linked To Lower Risk For Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes affect close to 100 million people in the U.S. alone. Adding full-fat dairy products to your daily diet may reduce your risk of diabetes, improve your weight management and improve your insulin sensitivity. Choosing the right kind of full-fat milk and dairy products is important. When possible use organic, grass-fed, raw dairy products over milk produced at concentrated animal feeding programs (CAFOs). By Dr. Mercola The number of people with type 2 diabetes equals 9.3 percent of the population of the U.S. or 29 million people.1 This is an increase from the 2010 estimate of 26 million people. Another 86 million people have pre-diabetes, where their blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. If those with pre-diabetes do not make changes to their diet and exercise habits, between 15 percent and 30 percent will develop diabetes within the next five years. These numbers are overwhelming when you consider the complications related to diabetes have an impact on the individual, the family and the workforce. Diabetes is a serious health condition with serious complications. Without consistent blood sugar control, excess glucose in your blood causes damage to your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, eyes, gums, teeth and neurological system. Adults with diabetes experience greater risk for these conditions as reported by the American Diabetes Association using data from 2008 to 2012: 2 ✓ 71 percent of individuals with diabetes were diagnosed with hypertension or high blood pressure ✓ 65 percent of people with diabetes were diagnosed with high cholesterol levels ✓ Death from heart disease was 1.7 times greater than those without diabetes ✓ Hospitalization for heart attack was 1.8 percent higher than th Continue reading >>

Bring On The Full-fat Dairy? Not So Fast

Bring On The Full-fat Dairy? Not So Fast

Full-fat dairy was linked with reduced risk of diabetes, but experts say it's not a green light to load up on milk, cheese and butter. With commentary by researcher Frank Hu, MD, MPH, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology, Harvard Medical School and T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The debate about high-fat versus low-fat dairy foods is simmering again. In the latest study, adults who consumed more full-fat dairy products(as reflected by higher levels of certain fatty acids in their bloodsamples) had a lower risk of getting type 2 diabetes over a long-term follow-up. In some press reports, that finding was translated to mean it's time to switch to whole-fat dairy foods, despite current dietary guidelines that suggest choosing low-fat or non-fat dairy as part of a healthy diet.1 Not so fast, says Frank Hu, MD, PhD, MPH, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health and a study coauthor. "I wouldn't use this research to give a green light for people to drink whole milk [or other high-fat products]," he says. "This is a very preliminary result." Dr. Hu and his colleagues followed more than 3,300 adults, ages 30 to 75, enrolled in two different long-term studies. One, the Nurses' Health Study, began in 1989. The other, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, began in 1993. The researchers tracked the men and women through 2010. During that time, 277 new cases of diabetes were diagnosed. The researchers then looked at blood samples taken at the start of the studies, measuring circulating levels of fatty acid biomarkers found in high-fat dairy foods.The higher these biomarkers, the lower the risk of getting diabetes, with the risk reduction ranging from 43 to 52%. The link held after adjusting fo Continue reading >>

Is It Ok To Eat Full Fat Dairy, Like Yoghurt, Milk And Butter?

Is It Ok To Eat Full Fat Dairy, Like Yoghurt, Milk And Butter?

For many years we’ve been told to eat low-fat dairy products on the grounds that fat is bad for us and makes us fat. There was never any strong evidence for this and it is getting weaker all the time. The big mistake was lumping all fats together. Fatty fish, for example, now gets the thumbs up all round. Full fat dairy is also making a comeback. In a recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition they found, in line with previous studies, that eating more dairy products was associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. To find out more, follow the link In this study researchers collected data on the eating habits of 27,000 middle aged Swedes in early 1990 and then followed them for twenty years. What they found was that those who ate the most high-fat dairy products had a 23 per cent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate the least. Why? Well dairy is rich in a particular type of fatty acid called heptadecanoic acid, also known as margaric acid. It is a type of saturated fat found in dairy fat, rye, and some fish. Lots of studies have shown that margaric acid reduces your risk of diabetes and hearts disease. Like this big study from Cambridge University and Harvard Medical School: I was also charmed by reading this study in dolphins. Titled, “Research with dolphins provides hope for prevention of diabetes in humans” the researchers found that feeding dolphins a diet high in heptadecanoic acid “reversed metabolic syndrome in dolphins” Continue reading >>

The Case Against Low-fat Milk Is Stronger Than Ever

The Case Against Low-fat Milk Is Stronger Than Ever

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. For years you’ve been told to go for skim over full-fat dairy. Even the latest dietary guidelines for Americans urge people to avoid the full fat, and following this lead, school lunch programs provide only low-fat milk and no whole milk at all, even though they do allow chocolate skim milk with its added sugars. But large population studies that look at possible links between full-fat dairy consumption, weight and disease risk are starting to call that advice into question. And some research suggests people who consume full-fat dairy weigh less and are less likely to develop diabetes, too. MORE: Why Full-Fat Dairy May Be Healthier Than Low-Fat In a new study published in the journal Circulation, Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian and his colleagues analyzed the blood of 3,333 adults enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study of Health Professionals Follow-up Study taken over about 15 years. They found that people who had higher levels of three different byproducts of full-fat dairy had, on average, a 46% lower risk of getting diabetes during the study period than those with lower levels. “I think these findings together with those from other studies do call for a change in the policy of recommending only low-fat dairy products,” says Mozaffarian. “There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy.” MORE: Ending the War on Fat Since full-fat dairy products contain more calories, many experts assumed avoiding it would lower diabetes risk. But studies have found that when people reduce how much fat they eat, they tend to replace it with sugar or carbohydrates, both of which can have worse effects on insulin and diabetes risk. In the current study, Mozaffarian adjusted Continue reading >>

Why Full-fat Dairy May Reduce Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Why Full-fat Dairy May Reduce Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Why Full-Fat Dairy May Reduce Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Time recently reported on some recent research that shows we may reduce our type 2 diabetes riskby indulging in full-fat dairy versus low-fat dairy Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian and team studied blood samples of 3,333 adults participating in the Nurses Health Study of Professionals Follow-up Study derived over approximately 15 years. The study found that the adults with higher levels of three byproducts of full-fat diary also averaged to have a 46% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes during the length of the study than those who had lower levels which indicated a lower consumption of full-fat diary. Dr. Mozaffarian told Time,I think these findings together with those from other studies do call for a change in the policy of recommending only low-fat dairy products, and that There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy. Dr. Mozaffarian controlled for weight in this study and discovered that regardless of weight gain, full-fat dairy intake still lowered a persons type 2 diabetes risk. Time also mentioned another study from the American Journal of Nutrition where a separate team of researchers compared the effects of full-fat and low-fat dairy on obesity. This study involving 18,438 women found that the women eating the most high-fat dairy products lowered their risk of being overweight or obese by 8%. Why Were We Told to Avoid Full-fat Diary to Begin With? Full-fat dairy contains more calories than low-fat dairy. For example, one container of the popular greek yogurt, Fage Total contains 190 calories whereas their 0% fat option contains 100 calories by comparison. Their 2% fat option contains 150 calories. Health experts have thought that red Continue reading >>

More in diabetes