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Fruits That Lower Blood Sugar

10 Foods That Can Help With Blood Sugar Control

10 Foods That Can Help With Blood Sugar Control

1 / 11 Your Diabetes Diet: What Foods Can Help Control Blood Sugar? While medication, sleep, stress, and time of day can all play a role in diabetes management, experts agree that diet is one of the most important factors to keep in mind. That’s because specific food choices can have a direct effect on your blood sugar levels, says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, the coauthor of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies and the founder of Diabetes EveryDay, of Hilton Head, South Carolina. Inattention to what you decide to nourish yourself with can lead to serious consequences, like an increased risk of vision problems, nerve damage, amputations, and even death. "Managing blood glucose levels is key to preventing future complications," Smithson says. The reason why people with diabetes develop excess amounts of sugar in their blood is insulin resistance, the hallmark of the disease. Insulin resistance is the inability of the hormone insulin to effectively transport glucose, or blood sugar, to the body’s cells to be used for energy or stored as fuel for future use. When sugar can’t reach the body’s cells it accumulates in the blood, potentially leading to the aforementioned complications. Regularly checking your blood sugar is one of the best ways to ensure it stays controlled, according to the Mayo Clinic. You can use a glucose meter to self-monitor your levels and observe what impact different factors — like exercise, stress, and food choices — may have. To figure out when and how often to check your blood sugar, consult your primary care provider, because these recommendations tend to vary based on the type of diabetes you have and your individual health profile. While everybody’s goal may be different, there are certain kinds of foods experts agree are g Continue reading >>

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

Part 1 of 15 A healthy diet is essential to reversing prediabetes. There are no foods, herbs, drinks, or supplements that lower blood sugar. Only medication and exercise can. But there are things you can eat and drink that have a low Glycemic Index (GI). This means these foods won’t raise your blood sugar and may help you avoid a blood sugar spike. In addition to diet changes, staying or becoming active is also important. Learn which foods you can add to your diet plan. You may be able to prevent prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by adding more of these foods, spices, and drinks into your diet. Eat them as healthy alternatives to sugar, high GI carbohydrates, or other treats. Want more info like this? Sign up for our diabetes newsletter and get resources delivered right to your inbox » Part 2 of 15 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are important components of a healthy blood sugar eating plan. They can improve insulin sensitivity. They can also help increase feelings of satiety, and have a healthy impact on blood pressure and inflammation. MUFAs are a key nutrient in avocados. Studies have shown avocados can lower the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is a group of risk factors that can increase the risk of diabetes. It can also raise the risk of blood vessel disease like heart disease and stroke. Avocados also have a low GI. For a unique, diabetes-friendly dessert, try making Oh She Glow’s natural, no sugar added, raw avocado chocolate pudding. Part 3 of 15 Protein helps the body maintain and repair itself. Since protein doesn't impact blood sugar levels, it doesn't have a GI ranking and won’t raise blood sugar levels. Protein also increases satiety, so relying on protein to feel full instead of bread, rice, or pasta may be Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

When you have type 2 diabetes, what you eat can help you control your blood sugar, stave off hunger, and feel full longer. “Diabetes is when your blood sugar or glucose levels are higher than normal. It’s carbohydrate foods like breads, cereals, rice, pasta, fruits, milk, and desserts that can cause this rise," says Maggie Powers, PhD, president-elect of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. Your eating plan should focus on the amount and type of carbs you put on your plate throughout the day, Powers says. But it’s also important to have foods you enjoy. You want to eat enough so you feel satisfied and avoid overeating and poor choices. Here are seven foods that Powers says can help keep your blood sugar in check and make you happy and healthy to boot. These add color, flavor, and texture to a meal. Choose tasty, low-carb veggies, like mushrooms, onions, eggplant, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, and low-carb squashes, like zucchini. Try them with dips such as low-fat dressings, hummus, guacamole, and salsa, or roasted with different seasonings such as rosemary, cayenne pepper, or garlic. Go beyond your regular salad and try kale, spinach, and chard. They’re healthy, delicious, and low-carb, Powers says. Roast kale leaves in the oven with olive oil for quick, crunchy chips. You can also mix greens in with roasted veggies to add texture and a different flavor, or serve them with a little protein, like salmon. Plain water is always good, but water infused with fruits and vegetables is more interesting. Cut up a lemon or cucumber and put it in your water, or make ice cubes with some flavoring in them. If you’re not a hot tea drinker, try cold tea with lemon or a cinnamon stick. “Not only are these beverages low-carb, they can also help fill y Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diet - 7 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Prediabetes Diet - 7 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

More than a third of Americans have a serious health condition that puts them at increased risk for heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetesand 90 percent of them don't know it. Called prediabetes , this condition is when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Those with prediabetes typically have some insulin resistance, or their pancreas is unable to make enough insulin to keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. Although those with prediabetes have up to a 50 percent chance of developing diabetes over the next 5 to 10 years, with lifestyle changeslike eating foods that lower blood sugaryou can reduce your risk. Prediabetes is a warning sign that you have been insulin resistant for some time, says Hillary Wright , RD, director of nutrition for the Domar Center for Mind/Body Health. However, many are able to prevent or postpone diabetes. In addition to becoming more active, losing weight, decreasing stress, quitting smoking, and getting proper sleep, eating healthier can help prevent or reverse prediabetes. Start with the tips below, and talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian who specializes in diabetes for more personalized advice. HOW TO EAT TO PREVENT (OR REVERSE) DIABETES Have breakfast within an hour or two of waking up and then eat a snack or meal every three to six hours after that, says Rebecca Denison, RD, doctor of integrative medicine and diabetes educator at Greater Baltimore Medical Centers Geckle Diabetes and Nutrition Center . This will add up to three to six total meals and snacks daily. It takes about four to six hours for your body to digest a meal. You want to eat just a teeny bit before you actually need it so that your body doesnt have to figure out how to keep your blood sugar stable, Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar And Relieve Diabetes Symptoms

Top 10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar And Relieve Diabetes Symptoms

Don't like kale as your salad base? Try spinach instead. You'll get much more nutritional value out of these greens than you would iceberg lettuce. Eggs are an amazing source of protein for diabetics. About 7 grams per large egg, in fact. Not only that, they contain about a half a gram of carbs per large egg. Because carbohydrates increase blood sugar levels, it's safe to say that an egg won't harm them. Like everything, diabetics should take care to eat eggs in moderation. A surplus of eggs could mean an increase in cholesterol levels. Although it doesn't have quite the negative impact it was once thought to have, cholesterol should be monitored by diabetics. More good news here. There are many fatty food options : Chia seeds (pro tip: add seeds to shakes) These food items mean one large thing: a healthy diet doesn't have to be boring or tasteless. It can be eclectic, multi-faceted, and scrumptious. The American Diabetes Association said that diabetics should add no-sodium or dried beans to their meals several times a week . Not only do they contain the necessary proteins and fibers, they are very low on the glycemic index. We recommend eating your berries and fruits whole. Blending them in shakes takes away the nutritional fibers, but leaves the fructose. Drinking fruity drinks tends to result in a high sugar intake. Eating them whole allows your body to receive the necessary fiber and vitamins. The more fiber you take in, the longer you'll feel full and stave off bad cravings later. Steer clear of anything syrupy or processed. Whole is healthy! Before eating certain veggies, take a moment to find out their GI levels. The glycemic index needs to be low in order for it to help lower your blood sugar. Some veggies, like potatoes, have a much higher GI level. What are s Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar At Home

9 Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar At Home

When a person has diabetes, either their body does not produce enough insulin, or it cannot use the insulin correctly, so glucose accumulates in the blood. High levels of blood glucose can cause a range of symptoms, from exhaustion to heart disease. One way to control blood sugar is to eat a healthful diet. Generally, foods and drinks that the body absorbs slowly are best because they do not cause spikes and dips in blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) measures the effects of specific foods on blood sugar levels. People looking to control their levels should pick foods with low or medium GI scores. A person can also pair foods with low and high GI scores to ensure that a meal is balanced. Below are some of the best foods for people looking to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Pumpernickel has a low GI score and fewer carbs than other breads. Many kinds of bread are high in carbohydrates and quickly raise blood sugar levels. As a result many breads should be avoided. However, pumpernickel bread and 100 percent stone-ground whole wheat bread have low GI scores, at 55 or less on the GI scale. Pumpernickel and stone-ground whole wheat breads have lower GI scores than regular whole wheat bread because the ingredients go through less processing. Processing removes the fibrous outer shells of grains and cereals. Fiber slows digestion and helps to stabilize blood sugar levels. In a 2014 study , researchers reported that spelt and rye both caused low initial glycemic responses in rats. They also found that these ancient wheat types, as well as emmer and einkorn, suppressed genes that promote glucose metabolism. Except for pineapples and melons, most fruits have low GI scores of 55 or less. This is because most fruits contain lots of water and fiber to balance out their natur Continue reading >>

10 Best Low-sugar Fruits That Wont Mess With Your Blood Sugar

10 Best Low-sugar Fruits That Wont Mess With Your Blood Sugar

10 best low-sugar fruits that wont mess with your blood sugar Looking for fruit that doesn't affect your blood sugar? Did you know that your body actually needs sugar? But it's the natural sugar found in fruit that you need. ~ Look: We need sugar to survive, both physically and emotionally. But even with fruits, you can inadvertently have too much of a good thing. That said, you shouldnt just cut out fruits altogether when trying to limit sugar intake. Fruits contain important nutrients like vitamin C, fibre and antioxidants and increasing yourintake of fruits and vegetableshas been shown to reduce your cancer and mortality risk. Instead, reach for fruits that are lower in sugar per serving. While registered dietititian Sarah Hortman says there arent any official guidelines as to what constitutes a low-sugar fruit, she says that fruits containing higher fibre and water content dilute the amount of sugar or carbohydrate in a fruit. Without further (avoca)ado, theselow-sugar fruitswill allow you to get your sugar fix minus the dreaded energy crash. Yes, the reason millennials cant afford to buy property is also a solid source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and fibre. Avocados are so tasty and low in sugar that they make the perfect dessert substitute, says Hortman. Just swap your typical sweetener for some pured avocado in your favourite milkshake, mousse, and cake recipes. Per 1/3 fruit: 334kJ, 7g fat (1g sat), 4g carbs, 0.3g sugar, 4mg sodium, 3g fibre, 1g protein Read more: Which is better for weight loss: fruits or veggies? Watermelon might be your next favourite workout recovery snack. In a small study from the Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry , researchers found that the amino acids in the fruit juice helped athletes recover faster (and feel less sore) Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

Eating a whole foods, plant-based diet is one of the simplest ways to manage your blood sugar and elevate your health to a whole new level. Your blood sugar controls several different hormonal responses in the body, all of which contribute to your energy, your mood, and even your hunger levels. Healthy blood sugars are also vital to prevent or manage Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypoglycemia. Eating a diet that supports your blood sugar can also help prevent obesity. Plant-based foods are jam-packed with fiber, which is the main reason they’re so supportive of blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the release of sugar within the bloodstream, which helps steady insulin levels. This prevents those blood sugar “ups and downs” that foods high in refined sugars, animal foods, and highly- processed foods can cause. To take care of your blood sugar, all you have to do is prioritize higher fiber sources of whole foods versus foods lower in fiber, such as foods with refined or added sugars, animal products (which dramatically raise insulin), and most processed foods. To keep things easy and simple, focus on eating foods that do support your blood sugar instead of focusing on those that don’t. As you’ll see, there are some pretty delicious plant-based foods and meals you can make with them that support your blood sugar. These foods will keep you energized, satisfied, provide your body with vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and even some protein too! 1. Magnesium-Rich Leafy Greens All leafy greens such as: kale, spinach, romaine, arugula, collards, turnip greens, all lettuces, Swiss chard, dandelion greens, and any other green you can think of, are absolutely wonderful for your blood sugar. However, a few are especially rich in magnesium, which is acts like a Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

High blood sugar and insulin resistance are linked with inflammation, heart disease, kidney disease, and diabetes. Protect yourself with these nine blood-sugar-balancing foods: 1. Cinnamon Contains compounds that reduce blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity, and cinnamon may also lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels—risk factors in diabetes. Don’t overdo it: Studies have found results with only ¼–1/2 teaspoon per day, and cinnamon contains coumarin, which may cause problems at higher doses. Try this: Stir cinnamon and currants into oatmeal; add a cinnamon stick to your morning coffee; toss steamed sweet potatoes with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and coconut oil. Did You Know? Studies show that eating as little as 1/4 tsp. of cinnamon per day can improve insulin sensitivity and may also lower cholesterol. 2. Vinegar Contains acetic acid, which improves insulin sensitivity and can lower blood sugar by as much as 20 percent when consumed before or with meals containing carbs. Try this: Simmer balsamic vinegar until reduced to a thick, syrupy glaze, and drizzle on strawberries; combine apple cider vinegar with honey, lemon juice, and cayenne pepper for a breakfast tonic; whisk together red wine vinegar, shallots, mustard, thyme, and olive oil for an easy vinaigrette. 3. Broccoli sprouts Are high in a compound called sulforaphane that can improve insulin resistance and protect against diabetes. Broccoli sprouts also help lower LDL cholesterol, triglyceride levels, and inflammation in people with diabetes. You can find broccoli sprouts in most natural food stores, or look for broccoli sprout powder. Try this: Combine broccoli sprouts, grated carrot, and thinly sliced red onion in a pita; toss broccoli sprouts with shredded spinach, grated beets, and avocado, an Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acidsthe "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerelcan help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. A study at the University of Texas Southwest Continue reading >>

10 Powerful Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Quickly

10 Powerful Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Quickly

10 Powerful Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Quickly Heather McClees is a holistic nutritionist and writer from SC who is an avid health and fitness nut, yogi, foodie, creator, and animal lover. Full Bio Blood sugar is a sneaky health issue, but there are many powerful foods that can help you lower blood sugar levels efficiently and quickly. First, in order to understand why high (and low) blood sugar occurs, its important to have a basic understanding of what triggers blood sugar highs and lows, and it all starts with insulin. Insulin is the hormone that goes into our blood stream and delivers nutrients to the cells so that our blood sugar stays stable. While insulin is often thought of as a negative hormone, its actually valuable and vital to our health. When our body doesnt produce insulin or use insulin efficiently, we can develop insulin resistance which can lead to Type 2 diabetes. One of the best things we can all do in order to help insulin do its job is to eat regularly and eat a balanced diet thats filled with healthy foods.Blood sugar is a sneaky health issue, but there are many powerful foods that can help you lower blood sugar levels efficiently and quickly. First, in order to understand why high (and low) blood sugar occurs, its important to have a basic understanding of what triggers blood sugar highs and lows, and it all starts with insulin. Insulin is the hormone that goes into our blood stream and delivers nutrients to the cells so that our blood sugar stays stable. While insulin is often thought of as a negative hormone, its actually valuable and vital to our health. When our body doesnt produce insulin or use insulin efficiently, we can develop insulin resistance which can lead to Type 2 diabetes. One of the best things we can all do in order to help Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

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