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Frequent Urination While Taking Metformin For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (or Glucophage) for polycystic ovararian symdrome (PCOS) by Kelly Why would you be taking metformin or glucophage (metformin is the generic for glucophage) Metformin is a diabetes medicine used for lowering insulin and blood sugar levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This helps regulate menstrual cycles, start ovulation, and lower the risk of miscarriage in women with PCOS. It is generally used in conjuction with clomid. The most common side effects of metformin Nausea. Loss of appetite. Diarrhea. Increased abdominal gas. A metallic taste. Tiredness. Problems that might arise and ways to troubleshoot I have always had pretty strong side effects (lots of nausea and always very tired) while taking metformin. It does get better as time goes on but working myself up to the maximum dosage has always been hard. I’ve been to a number of different doctors who have all suggested different ways to work up to my maximum dosage (1500 mg). It is generally suggested that you start with the lowest dose and keep increasing it as you get used to it (or as the side effects start to go away). The first time I took it, I took 500 mg for about three weeks (1 pill in the morning). Then added a second pill at lunch time (so I took 1000 mg for 3 weeks). And, then I added a third pill at dinner time. The second time that I took metformin, I increased the dosage from 500 mg to 1500 mg over the course of three weeks. I was sick a lot but I feel like I got the worst part over with faster. My personal experience has been that it usually takes me about 1 month for the side effects to start to lessen. I will still have bouts of nausea, but after about 2 months that starts to happen less often. My personal tips Always take with food or a glass of milk – I always take my Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

Metformin For Pcos: How It Works, Side Effects & Health Tips

Metformin For Pcos: How It Works, Side Effects & Health Tips

Metformin decreases insulin resistance and helps the body in utilizing insulin effectively. Given that PCOS is also associated with insulin resistance, doctors started prescribing Metformin for this hormonal disorder as well. Let’s understand the role of metformin for PCOS in detail. Insulin Resistance: The Reason Behind Prescribing Metformin For PCOS Insulin resistance is a common condition in a majority of PCOS patients. Experts believe it is a key reason behind this condition. If you’re experiencing insulin resistance, your body fails to respond to normal levels of insulin. As a result, glucose starts to accumulate in the blood. To tackle excess blood sugar, the pancreas produce more insulin. This condition is called hyperinsulinemia or the presence of excessive insulin in the blood. High levels of insulin in the body trigger the over-production of male hormones in the female body. Excess male hormones in the female body lead to symptoms of PCOS such as acne, excess body hair, male pattern baldness, and belly fat. Metformin For PCOS – How Does It Work? The USFDA approved metformin in 1994. Metformin for PCOS works in the following ways: Improving insulin sensitivity of cells, thus helping reduce insulin levels in the blood Curbing the production of glucose inside the liver Increasing the absorption of glucose by cells, and Inhibiting the use of fatty acids for production of energy. Doctors also figured out that prescribing metformin for PCOS helped patients in regularizing their periods. They also found that the drug helped in reducing the levels of male hormones in PCOS patients. PCOS patients have to undergo something called as “ovary stimulation” prior to IVF treatment. Doctors prescribe Metformin for PCOS to reduce the risk of a condition called ovarian Continue reading >>

Pcos Treatment And Metformin

Pcos Treatment And Metformin

Insulin Sensitizers The newer treatments for PCOS aim at the root cause – elevated insulin levels. Insulin sensitizers are intended to help the body begin to effectively process insulin again. These medications were originally prescribed to people with type II diabetes but have also been shown to successfully treat women with PCOS who have insulin resistance. Let’s use the door-and-key analogy again. Insulin sensitizers help the body rediscover the key to unlock the cell doors, allowing the entry and storage of excess glucose. As insulin and glucose levels return to normal, the ovary resumes normal function, and many of the other hormones return to a more appropriate level. In turn, many PCOS symptoms diminish. For many women, insulin sensitizers restore menstrual cycles and alleviate such symptoms as hair growth on the body, thinning hair, acne, and excess weight. Insulin sensitizers lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. These medications ay also cause insulin-resistant women to start ovulating again. If you are taking insulin sensitizers, report any changes in your monthly cycle to your doctor. In addition, let your health-care provider know if you are trying to become pregnant, are already pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Side effects of insulin sensitizers are rate. Although these medications lower elevated blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, when given to women with high insulin levels, they only lower insulin levels. Blood sugar levels will not change; therefore, women will not experience episodes of “low blood sugar.” Because research has indicated that some insulin sensitizers might cause liver problems, your physician should monitor your liver function by conducting periodic blood tests as a precaution is any of the medications Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Interstitial Cystitis? - Pcos Nutrition Center

What Are The Symptoms Of Interstitial Cystitis? - Pcos Nutrition Center

What Are The Symptoms Of Interstitial Cystitis? By Angela on September 20, 2015 under Related Conditions Do you feel like you have the most sensitive bladder on the planet? Maybe you have frequent urges to urinate (even during the night) or experience pain when you do? You may have a condition known as Interstitial Cystitis. A study published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics found that women with PCOS who had higher serum testosterone levels reported to have more bladder symptoms such as pain with intercourse, urgency to urinate, waking up several times to urinate during the night, and bladder or pelvic pain. Many of these reported symptoms are also symptoms seen in those suffering with interstitial cystitis. In this informative article, guest post IC expert, author, and dietitian Julie Beyer helps us understand IC and how a few diet changes can make a big difference. Interstitial cystitis, or IC, is a chronic pelvic pain syndrome originating in the bladder. Other names for IC include painful bladder syndrome (PBS), bladder pain syndrome (BPS, used primarily in Europe), and hypersensitive bladder syndrome (HBS, used primarily in Asia). Patients with IC experience urinary pain, frequency, urgency, and nighttime urination that cannot be attributed to other causes. Although symptoms of interstitial cystitis can be confused with a urinary tract infection, urine from an IC patient does not show any bacteria when cultured. Sometimes I describe IC to people as the difference between a cold and allergies. A person may sneeze with both, but a cold is caused by a germ and allergies are not. Patients with IC have a damaged bladder lining. Both the glycosaminoglycans (GAG) layer (the protective mucous coating on the surface of the bladder), and the urothelial layer (th Continue reading >>

Metformin...bloating...frequent Night Urination...

Metformin...bloating...frequent Night Urination...

Metformin...bloating...frequent night urination... If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Metformin...bloating...frequent night urination... Pcos...mother of 1..thanks to metformin! I am 44! Gestational diabetes insulin dependent...after baby was born, (April 2011) no longer diabetic.... Jump ahead to now...pre diabetic so taking metformin again...blood sugars are decent... lately....major bloating in upper abdomen..frequent night time urination...some lower back pain occasionally... of course will make a gyn. Appt...but scared its ovarian cancer....my grandmother died of it... i had a ca125 marker test done 4 years ago and to a false positive due to having pcos...not fun going through that! Anyone else experience any similarities?? How recently have you checked your sugar? Bloating can be a side effect of met. Emily (36) & DH Kevin (37), married 10/24/10 1/3 Follistim cycle - OHSS, Chemical pregnancy 2/11 Follistim cycle 2, lower dose - BFP 3/4! EDD 11/13/13 It's a BOY! Samuel Jacob born 11/2/13 at 38w3d How recently have you checked your sugar? Bloating can be a side effect of met. Hiya... Blood sugars are controlled with met.. My first thought with frequent urination is that it's sugar related. Whenever I eat even high GI foods I have to wake multiple (3-4x) a night to pee. Even if your sugars are "controlled" I still believe you can have symptoms from consuming high GI foods or sugars. I've never had an abnormal test for sugar and have had symptoms of sugar issues (peeing or even the jitters as a preteen). Good that you are making an appt with Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Frequent Urination?

Can Metformin Cause Frequent Urination?

Clorazepam Rigevidon Weight Gain Belviq vs Phentermine Brintellix and Alcohol Nexplanon Weight Loss Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin And Increase In Urination

Metformin And Increase In Urination

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was prescribed Metformin a month ago for T2 Diabetes. My blood glucose has been 6.8 for a couple of months now so not extremely high the GP said. I am now at 1000mg am and 500mg pm and I have found that I need to use the loo every 30mins which unusual for me. Has anyone else noticed an increase in needing the loo? I have also put myself on a low carb diet so not sure if that is what it is. laughs ... yes I tend to go more often it is the nightly visits that get me cross tend to wake up at least once to go to the loo never used to before it is the meds I guess Awww. Thanks so much PatsyB. That is reassuring. I had all the fasting bloods done before starting on the meds and they all came back ok so I guess it is nothing else. Just have to stay close to the loo. Lol!! Hi. I've never experienced this or seen anyone else mention it if you are talking about urination. If you are talking more than urination, then plain Metformin is well-known for causing diarrhea. If this is the problem do ask the GP for the Slow Release (SR) version which normally cures it. Don't rely on fasting tests as such. Look at readings 2 hours after a meal as well to check your level of post meal spiking just in case your blood sugar is going higher than you think it is No not diarrhea. I haven't suffered with that at all. Just the urination increasing. I will mention it to the GP just in case. I was prescribed Metformin a month ago for T2 Diabetes. My blood glucose has been 6.8 for a couple of months now so not extremely high the GP said. I am now at 1000mg am and 500mg pm and I have found that I need to use the loo every 30mins which unusual for me. Has anyone else noticed an in Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common hormonal disorder that is one of the leading causes of infertility. Some women who have PCOS develop insulin resistance. This occurs when the cells of the body don’t respond well to a hormone known as insulin. Insulin allows the cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood. If the cells don’t take in this sugar it leads to higher levels of glucose and insulin circulating through the body in the bloodstream. This, in turn, leads to increased levels of androgens (male hormones) which cause the classic symptoms of PCOS such as excess hair growth and more importantly in terms of fertility – lack of ovulation. Getting pregnant with PCOS can be possible with the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Here are the Top 10 facts about metformin use in PCOS patients: 1) Metformin is a medication that is primarily used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is marketed in the US under the names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. It is available as a tablet, extended-release tablet and a liquid. 2) With infertility patients, it is used not because the women with PCOS have diabetes (although they do have an increased risk of developing this disease), but because it acts on improving use of insulin by the cells of the body and therefore reducing the level of insulin in the blood. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in excessive hair growth, acne and weight gain. It may also slow down or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes later in life. 3) To determine if it would be helpful for a patient with PCOS to use Metformin, they are given a 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test. First, a fasting blood sample is drawn to determine a baseline glucose level. The patient t Continue reading >>

What Will Happen If I Stop Taking Metformin For Pcos?

What Will Happen If I Stop Taking Metformin For Pcos?

Metformin helps you manage the symptoms of the disease. There is no no doubt that it works. But it does not offer a cure. You can discontinue metformin on only one condition - you should exercise more and cut out all refined sugars and processed foods or just look around to what other diabetics do for insulin resistance. I cannot emphasize home-cooked food enough. Home cooked-food without those processed sauces and canned ingredients. Try it for a short time after you are on an exercise regimen for atleast a month.Keep checking your sugar from time to time. You will know that you need to get back on your metformin if the cravings and the bluesy moods come back. If the cravings don’t come back well and good, but if it does, you should get back on metformin. What I can assure you is that there is no harm in trying - PCOS is a lifelong thing - so nothing that you do can kill or cure you in a day or week. Whatever works will work over months. So give exercise and no sugar a try for two -three months. In the first month continue with the metformin with the exercise and in the next, reduce use by either reducing dosage or eating one every two days. And then if things look positive stop completely. Losing weight also helps reduce metformin dependence. While you are at it one basic advice I can give you is - don’t get into tiring exercise regimes (walking for an hour is also good), don’t get into diets unless your gynaecologist/endocrinologist has recommended one (even then don’t get into anything punishing because sustaining it will be stressful) and do everything it takes to keep a healthy mind - remove or modify habits from your life that induce stress - be it your job, family or friends. Identify them and pull the plug. Be nice to yourself. Please note that if you a Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

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