diabetestalk.net

Free Nursing Journal Articles On Diabetes

Nursecommunity Teamwork Improves Diabetes Care

Nursecommunity Teamwork Improves Diabetes Care

Community health workers (CHWs) in American Samoa, led by a nurse manager, successfully helped adults with type 2 diabetes to lower their blood glucose levels. In the island territory southwest of Hawaii, 21.5% of adults have type 2 diabetes, nearly double the national rate. The 268 participants received either free CHW care or standard care. The CHWs were local residents who made home visits weekly, monthly, or quarterly, depending on the diabetes health risk. They tested blood glucose, provided education on diet and exercise, reminded patients to take medicines, and helped them solve care problems. After one year, 42% of subjects in the intervention group had reduced their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level by 0.5% (considered clinically significant), compared with 32% of those receiving standard care. Patients receiving CHW care were twice as likely to reduce their HbA1c level by 0.5%, and high-risk patients, who saw CHWs most often, made the greatest improvements. Costs are a barrier to diabetes care in American Samoa. Patients in this area have difficulty paying the $10 copays for medical visits. The free home visits were very positively received, says study leader Judith DePue, clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. CHWs used culturally based flip charts, adapted from the National Diabetes Education Program, which included information about diet, exercise, risk reduction, medications, and managing stress. Flip charts made it easy for CHWs to teach in the fieldthey had talking points, says DePue. High-risk patients were asked to attend weekly group classes but often missed them, so the CHWs tracked them down at home or work. That flexibility boosted attendance to 74% of expected visits. I would not want Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing - Dotn

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing - Dotn

Ensuring the safe prescribing and management of insulin is a key concern for many healthcare professionals who treat... The Journal of Diabetes Nursing: New faces, new formats and new frontiers Simon Breed shares the latest developments with the journal. Andrew McGovern presents his research into the presence of type 3c diabetes. Journal scan: Continuous glucose monitoring and retinopathy Too busy to keep up to date with the latest research? Trisha Dunning reviews the latest research papers for diabetes nurses. News: Weight loss programme in primary care leads to diabetes remission Landmark trial shows type 2 diabetes remission with intensive low-calorie diet. Managing frailty in older people with diabetes Alan Sinclair discusses the latest international guidance on the management of frail older people. Debbie Hicks introduces the flash glucose monitoring system that was recently approved on the NHS Drug Tariff. The 77th American Diabetes Association meeting: What I learnt Gayle Richards describes her experience of the latest ADA meeting and highlights some of most interesting sessions. Journal scan: GLP-1 receptor agonists and cardiovascular outcomes; insulin in type 2 diabetes; and CGM in pregnancy Too busy to keep up to date with the latest research? Erwin Castro shares some research highlights from the recent EASD meeting in Lisbon. NICE updates PH38 guidance on preventing type 2 diabetes The amended guidelines make recommendations about who should be offered intensive lifestyle-change interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes. Dietary management of obesity and type 2 diabetes Pam Dyson outlines the evidence base for the available dietary strategies commonly recommended in the UK. Debbie Hicks considers whether the NHS RightCare diabetes pathway will deliver improve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Endocrinology Journals | Diabetes Scholarly Journals

Diabetes And Endocrinology Journals | Diabetes Scholarly Journals

Make the best use of Researched information from 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals operated by 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields. Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business Diabetes is a broad spectrum of metabolic diseases, characterized by impaired glucose metabolism. In addition to metabolic pathways, these diseases also manifest hormonal disturbances. Diabetes & Endocrinology Journals present the latest developments in the fields of Diabetes and Endocrinology. Ancillary topics such as metabolism and diabetic complications are also covered under the scope of these Journals. Diabetes & Endocrinology Journals contribute to the discussion of various treatment strategies and identification of potential diabetic agents. By virtue of publishing formats such as reviews, commentaries, and news and views, these journals encapsulate the latest developments in Diabetes research, and further new hypotheses in order to provoke scientific debates amongst scholars. Diabetes & Endocrinology Journals Impact Factors List Continue reading >>

Contribution By Primary Health Nurses And General Practitioners To The Diabetes Annual Review (get Checked) Programme In Auckland, New Zealand

Contribution By Primary Health Nurses And General Practitioners To The Diabetes Annual Review (get Checked) Programme In Auckland, New Zealand

Contribution by primary health nurses and general practitioners to the Diabetes Annual Review (Get Checked) programme in Auckland, New Zealand 16th August 2013, Volume 126 Number 1380 Barbara Daly, Timothy Kenealy, Bruce Arroll, Nicolette Sheridan, Robert Scragg The increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes in New Zealand (NZ),1and the inability to continue to meet the health care needs of large numbers of people with diabetes-related complications within specialist secondary health care services, initiated a Government-funded diabetes annual review (DAR) 'Get Checked' programme in 2000.2 A parallel development, the Primary Health Care (PHC) Strategy (2001),1,3encouraged the development of not-for-profit Primary Health Organisations (PHOs),1and following European4and United Kingdom (UK)5trends, aimed to increase PHC diabetes services and provide systematic care for all diabetes patients.1 Funding was provided for general practices through District Health Boards (DHBs) and PHOs, on a fee-for-service basis.2Either general practitioners (GPs) or practice-based PHC nurses were able to carry out the 'Get Checked' review, or its components, and check lists were used to encourage a comprehensive review of patients and for reimbursement purposes.2This created an opportunity and the expectation that practice-based nurses would expand their role and capacity in the community management of diabetes.6 In 2010, almost a quarter of all 42,334 registered nurses who are in NZ were working in a community or rural setting with 45% employed as practice nurses (PN), who are the largest group of PHC nurses.7PN predominantly work in general practice, although a small proportion work in Accident and Medical Clinics.8 The main two groups of specialist nurses (SN) who provide community-based dia Continue reading >>

Diabetes Therapy

Diabetes Therapy

Research, treatment and education of diabetes and related disorders Diabetes Therapy is an international, open access, peer-reviewed, rapid publication journal (peer review in 2 weeks, published 34 weeks from acceptance). The journal is dedicated to the publication of high quality clinical (all phases), observational, real-world, and health outcomes research around the discovery, development, and use of diabetes therapies. Studies relating to diagnosis, devices and diabetes technology, pharmacoeconomics, public health and epidemiology, quality of life, and patient care, management, and education are also encouraged. The journal is of interest to a broad audience of pharmaceutical and healthcare professionals and publishes original research, reviews, case reports, and short communications. The journal appeals to a global audience and receives submissions from all over the world. Articles published inDiabetes Therapymay be accompanied by lay-level summaries, to assist patients (and caregivers) in understanding important medical advances. Moving forward from traditional publishing, Diabetes Therapy offers a range of additional enhanced features designed to increase visibility, readership, and the educational value of the content. Each paper is accompanied by a bulleted Summary slide, giving a time-efficient overview of the content to a wide readership. Articles also have the option to include various other types of enhanced features including slide sets, videos and animations. All enhanced features are open access and are peer reviewed to the same high standard as the article itself. Diabetes Therapy is published under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License, which allows users to read, copy, distribute, and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing

Within the field of bariatric surgery, preoperative education to empower patients to adapt to the postoperative lifestyle and get the best outcomes in terms of health and quality of life is not standardised across the UK and is based mainly on clinical experience. In this study, the authors used qualitative research and a structured framework to design a preoperative psychosocial education course for people undergoing surgery. Qualitative interviews were performed to determine issues that previous surgery recipients felt were missing from their preoperative education, and the current educational course was redesigned to include this content. The study provides a template from which other Trusts could evaluate and improve their education. Increasing numbers of young children are being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), which has significant implications for primary schools. This study examined support provided to young children with T1D diabetes in two primary schools in the north of England. Case studies were used to examine the influences, perspectives and interactions of all adults involved in diabetes management. The framework approach was used to qualitatively analyse data from the 19 participants. A mix of direct and indirect support was provided by school personnel. There were five common themes: safety, knowledgeable individuals, appropriate environment, being treated as an individual, and independence. Safety was the major primary concern. School personnel providing direct support to children with T1D are ideally placed to increase children's confidence, resilience and independence through diabetes self-management skills. Greater collaboration and flexibility will aid children's acquisition of the self-manaeement skills needed over time. The diabetes team at Continue reading >>

Clinical Uncertainty In Treatment Decisions For Diabetic Patients | Annals Of Internal Medicine | American College Of Physicians

Clinical Uncertainty In Treatment Decisions For Diabetic Patients | Annals Of Internal Medicine | American College Of Physicians

Article, Author, and Disclosure Information Author, Article, and Disclosure Information From the Center for Clinical Management Research, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, and the University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana. Acknowledgment: The authors thank recruitment coordinator Claire Robinson; research assistants Stacey Hirth, Susan Jaeger, Madhavi Diwanji, Janice Thompson, Caroline Lynch, and Diana Newman, who worked tirelessly to recruit patients; data manager Jennifer Davis; site principal investigators Drs. David Aron, Martin Bermann, and Ketan Shah, without whom the study could not have been done; and the many providers and patients who participated. They also thank Drs. Rodney Hayward, Michele Heisler, and John Piette for their suggestions on earlier drafts of this manuscript. The authors are particularly grateful to Drs. Jane Forman and Richard Frankel for their insightful contributions to the overall study design. Grant Support: By a research grant from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service (IIR 02-225) and in part by the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center Grant (P60DK-20572) from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health. Potential Financial Conflicts of Interest: None disclosed. Reproducible Research Statement:Study protocol: Available by contacting Dr. Kerr (e-mail, [email protected] ). Statistical code: Available by contacting Dr. Hofer (e-mail, [email protected] ). Data set: Not available. Requests for Single Reprints: Eve A. Kerr, MD, MPH, Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Health Services Research and Develo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Research And Clinical Practice

Diabetes Research And Clinical Practice

Enter your login details below. If you do not already have an account you will need to register here . Due to migration of article submission systems, please check the status of your submitted manuscript in the relevant system below: Check the status of your submitted manuscript in EVISE Check the status of your submitted manuscript in EES: Once production of your article has started, you can track the status of your article via Track Your Accepted Article. CiteScore: 3.52 CiteScore measures the average citations received per document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a given year (e.g. 2015) to documents published in three previous calendar years (e.g. 2012 14), divided by the number of documents in these three previous years (e.g. 2012 14). The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years. 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2018) 5-Year Impact Factor: 3.308 Five-Year Impact Factor: To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2016 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years. 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2018) Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.445 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.538 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journals impact. Continue reading >>

Endocrine Archives - American Nurse Today

Endocrine Archives - American Nurse Today

Reducing barriers to glucose control in patients with gestational diabetes Author: Preventing adverse outcomes may hinge on your ability to identify and overcome barriers that prevent some pregnant women from managing their diabetes properly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 9.2% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as a serious complication during pregnancy. A positive glucose tolerance test in the second trimester can be a shock for an expectant woman. Poor glucose control can lead to poor . . . Author: Stacey A. Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM Learning objectives 1. Differentiate between enteral and parenteral nutrition. 2. Discuss how to manage hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes who are receiving supplemental nutrition. 3. Describe insulin use in patients with diabetes who are receiving supplemental nutrition. Purpose/goal: To provide nurses with information on . . . Author: Julie S. Lampe, MSN, CNS, CNS-BC, ADM-BC Its lunchtime. Three of your patients are scheduled to receive rapid-acting insulin in addition to sliding-scale insulin. Mr. Jones, age 87, has type 2 diabetes. His blood glucose level is 223 mg/dL. Hes on a clear diet. Mrs. Smith, age 63, has type 1 diabetes . . . Author: Stacey A. Seggelke, MS, RN, ACNS-BC, BC-ADM, CDE Approximately 25.8 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Especially with the diabetes rate rising yearly, youre likely to care for many patients with this disorder. Of those diagnosed with diabetes, 80% take diabetes medication (oral drugs, insulin, or both). Hypoglycemia is one of the . . . FDA approves new drug for type 2 diabetes On August 1, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Jardiance (empagliflozin) table Continue reading >>

Medscape Education | Nursing

Medscape Education | Nursing

Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape.If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. Log out Cancel Log in to see activities... Your saved activities will show here so that you can easily access Listen to our expert panel discuss the management of patients with progressive mCRC. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) 417 3 0.5 1 0.5 9 0.5 2 0.5 0.5 Roundtable 0 1 Goal-Directed Treatment of PAH: An Evolution to Up-front Combination Therapy Drs McLaughlin and Rubin discuss a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and their approaches to goal-directed treatment. Do you know your ADR? Review the latest techniques for colonoscopy CRC screening and polyp resection. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 260 1 1.0 9 1.0 2 1.0 1.0 Clinical Case 0 1 Clinical Case Challenges for appropriately managing and treating patients with COPD. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) 918 0 0.0 0.0 Roundtable 0 1 The Latest MS Research Updates in 2017: A Review of the Most Promising MS Research Happening Now Neurology & Neurosurgery2018-04-30 14:06:28.0 Join as an expert panel in multiple sclerosis conducts a review of the latest research advances in this challenging therapeutic area. PCSK9 Inhibitors Post-CVOTs: Implications for Clinical Care Dr Bhatt discusses the latest CV outcomes data for PCSK9 inhibitors and how they are likely to impact clinical care. Listen to our expert panel discuss the management of patients with progressive mCRC. Why Are Rates of Oral HPV Soaring Among Men? A new survey study finds that the prevalence of oral human papillomavirus infection among US men exceeds 10%, with lifestyle being a strong contributor. Are vegetarians more depressed? New study suggests the answer is yes. Increase i Continue reading >>

Nurse-patient Communication In Primary Care Diabetes Management: An Exploratory Study

Nurse-patient Communication In Primary Care Diabetes Management: An Exploratory Study

Nurse-patient communication in primary care diabetes management: an exploratory study Macdonald et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2013 Diabetes is a major health issue for individuals and for health services. There is a considerable literature on the management of diabetes and also on communication in primary care consultations. However, few studies combine these two topics and specifically in relation to nurse communication. This paper describes the nature of nurse-patient communication in diabetes management. Thirty-five primary health care consultations involving 18 patients and 10 nurses were video-recorded as part of a larger multi-site study tracking health care interactions between health professionals and patients who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Patients and nurses were interviewed separately at the end of the 6-month study period and asked to describe their experience of managing diabetes. The analysis used ethnography and interaction analysis. In addition to analysis of the recorded consultations and interviews, the number of consultations for each patient and total time spent with nurses and other health professionals were quantified and compared. This study showed that initial consultations with nurses often incorporated completion of extensive checklists, physical examination, referral to other health professionals and distribution of written material, and were typically longer than consultations with other health professionals. The consultations were driven more by the nurses clinical agenda than by what the patient already knew or wanted to know. Interactional analysis showed that protocols and checklists both help and hinder the communication process. This contradictory outcome was also evident at a health systems level: although organi Continue reading >>

Jmir-improving Diabetes Management With A Patient Portal: Qualitative Study Of A Diabetes Self-management Portal | Urowitz | Journal Of Medical Internet Research

Jmir-improving Diabetes Management With A Patient Portal: Qualitative Study Of A Diabetes Self-management Portal | Urowitz | Journal Of Medical Internet Research

The Karma system is currently undergoing maintenance (Monday, January 29, 2018). The maintenance period has been extended to 8PM EST. Karma Credits will not be available for redeeming during maintenance. 1ELLICSR: Health, Wellness & Cancer Survivorship Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada 2Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada 3University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada 4Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 5Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada ELLICSR: Health, Wellness & Cancer Survivorship Centre Toronto General Hospital, BCS021 Clinical Services Building Background: Effective management and care of diabetes is crucial to reducing associated risks such as heart disease and kidney failure. With increasing access and use of the Internet, online chronic disease management is being explored as a means of providing patients with support and the necessary tools to monitor and manage their disease. Objective: The objective of our study was to evaluate the experience of patients and providers using an online diabetes management portal for patients. Methods: Participants were recruited from a large sample population of 887 for a follow-up questionnaire to be completed after 6 months of using the patient portal. Participants were presented with the option to participate in an additional interview and, if the participant agreed, a time and date was scheduled for the interview. A 5-item, open-ended questionnaire was used to capture providers' opinions of the patient portal. Providers included general practitioners (GPs), nurses, nurse practitioners (NPs), dieticians, diabetes educators (DECs), and other clinical staff. Resu Continue reading >>

Prime Pubmed | Diabetic Foot Care Journal Articles From Pubmed

Prime Pubmed | Diabetic Foot Care Journal Articles From Pubmed

CONCLUSIONS: We have identified important targets for further investigation and quality improvement. CONCLUSIONS: A foot ulcer is the commonest complicationin diabetic patients followed by cellulitis. Standardized simple noninvasive testing methods should be used to identify patients at risk for the diabetic foot. Multidisciplinary diabetic foot care could be useful to prevent diabetes-related amputation of the lower extremities. IJIndian J Public Health 2018 Apr-Jun; 62(2):104-110 CONCLUSIONS: Self-care activities among diabetic patients were very poor. Self-management educational programs at hospitals along with information, education, and communication activities at the community level and one-to-one counseling are recommended. Jimnez S, Rubio JA, Lzaro-Martnez JL CONCLUSIONS: Sensory neuropathy, minor amputation, and implementation of the CFC program were predictors of reulceration. Implementation of the CFC program was associated to a 40% reduction in reulceration. Prevention of recurrent ulcers is feasible and should be a priority in a MDFU. DMDiabetes Metab Syndr Obes 2018; 11:255-264 Diabetes is associated with various complications and reduced quality of life. Of the many complications, some are life-threatening. Among these, foot complications remain an important concern. The m... Diabetes is associated with various complications and reduced quality of life. Of the many complications, some are life-threatening. Among these, foot complications remain an important concern. The major foot complications include foot ulceration, cellulitis, abscess, wet gangrene, dry gangrene, and necrotizing fasciitis, with different pathophysiological concepts behind each of them. Gangrene occurs due to reduced blood supply in the body tissues that leads to necrosis. This condit Continue reading >>

Managing Psychosocial Issues In A Family With Diabetes

Managing Psychosocial Issues In A Family With Diabetes

Managing Psychosocial Issues In a Family With Diabetes MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing January/February 2011, Volume :36 Number 1 , page 49 - 55 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Abstract: Managing diabetes in a child or teen requires constant attention and adjustment of insulin, carbohydrate intake, and activity level. Intensive diabetes management has the potential to improve diabetes outcomes; however, negotiating the many lifestyle accommodations essential to optimal diabetes control can place a significant burden on some children and families. Parenting a child with diabetes also involves a complex process of helping the child to achieve age-appropriate independence while assuring the child's safety in managing his or her diabetes. Each developmental stage brings new challenges to achieving the delicate balance between optimal diabetes control and age-appropriate independence in self-care management. Despite the laborious and intensive nature of diabetes treatment, an overarching goal of parenting a child with diabetes is to ensure that the family's quality of life is maintained and the child is able to participate in all academic and social activities that their peers enjoy. Although many families adapt and thrive, others struggle to make these adjustments. Working with families who are overwhelmed, encouraging them to identify and develop networks involving schools, extended family, community, and church groups can help them to increase available support. Helping families to access treatment when they are struggling can relieve further pain and improve management adherence and diabetes outcomes. Nurses are in a key position to evaluate the family's adaptive and coping skills and assist them to negotiate the Continue reading >>

Nurse Practitioner Management Of Type 2 Diabetes

Nurse Practitioner Management Of Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia impro Continue reading >>

More in diabetes