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Find Resources To Help You With Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml --including Samples, Videos, Published Clinical Studies, And Faq's.

Find Resources To Help You With Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml --including Samples, Videos, Published Clinical Studies, And Faq's.

This site is intended for U.S. Healthcare Professionals only. PLEASE NOTE: This reprint includes information that is not contained within the full prescribing information (PI) for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL and is not intended to offer recommendations about Toujeo that are inconsistent with the PI. Please read the full indication, the Important Safety Information and the full Prescribing Information . Sanofi US does not review the information contained in this website and/or database for content, accuracy, or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations, and conditions set by the website and/or database producer. Sanofi US makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on such website and/or database, nor does Sanofi US necessarily endorse such website and/or database. You are about to leave sanofi site for U.S. Sanofi US does not review the informationcontained on this website and/or databasefor content, accuracy or completeness. Useof and access to this information is subject tothe terms, limitations and conditions set by thewebsite and/or database producer. This site might not comply with the regulatory requirements of US You are about to move to an Unbranded site Toujeo is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Toujeo is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Toujeo contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus. The concentra Continue reading >>

Travel Guide For People With Diabetes

Travel Guide For People With Diabetes

Josiane Paiement, 2005 Winner of the Educational Production Contest Stéphane Chouinard, Pharmacist Coordination : Élyse Dion Design graphic and illustrations : Laurent Lavaill Diabetes Québec 8550, Pie-IX blvd. Suite 300 Montréal (Québec) H1Z 4G2 Phone: 514.259.3422 Toll Free: 1.800.361.3504 www.diabete.qc.ca Josiane Paiement, Type 1 diabetic 2005 Winner of the Educational Production Contest Stéphane Chouinard, Pharmacist Travel Guide for People with Diabetes Table of Contents What to do before you leave 7 What you should bring on your trip 12 At the airport 16 During your trip 17 Tips about insulin 21 Commercial brand names of insulin around the world 23 Tips for people taking diabetes pills 25 Diabetes pills 26 Meals 27 Exercise prior to boarding and during your flight 29 If you drive 30 Some useful phrases 31 Our goal is to provide you with the practical knowledge you need to confidently leave home and explore the world, despite certain restrictions imposed by your diabetes. This travel guide covers what you need to do before and during your trip to ensure that it is as enjoyable as possible. Before planning a trip, you need to be absolutely sure that you are healthy enough to go and your diabetes is very well controlled because travel can affect your blood sugar control. Be sure to consult your doctor before you plan your trip. Once you and your doctor have determined that you are healthy enough to travel, use this travel guide to organize your trip and avoid potential problems. 6 Gather information Learn as much as possible about the countries you intend to visit by consulting the following websites: World Health Organization www.who.int This website is an excellent resource for learning about the health and disease situation in the countries you Continue reading >>

Lost Insulin Or Insulin Pen

Lost Insulin Or Insulin Pen

Don't panic if insulin or an insulin pen goes missing Losing diabetes equipment such as your insulin dose or insulin pen can cause anxiety, particularly if you dont have available spares. This guides offers advice to help you replace your insulin or insulin pen whether at home, away from home or abroad. Before we tackle what to do when you have lost insulin or an insulin pen, its worth noting the importance of having spares available of insulin and insulin pens. We recommend that people using insulin pens have a spare set of insulin pens in case such a loss occurs. If you need replacement insulin or an insulin pen as a matter of urgency, follow these steps: Check obvious places for your insulin or insulin pen Call your out of hours service for an emergency prescription Collect your insulin or insulin pen from a pharmacy - or if out of hours, from a hospital This tip may be obvious but in the panic of thinking weve lost something important, it can be all too easy to overlook an obvious check. Take a few minutes to think whether the insulin pen may be recoverable. Was it put aside when travelling or at a restaurant? Have you checked all bags, cases and pockets? A few extra minutes thinking or checking could save up to a few tense hours of sorting out and collecting an emergency prescription request. Call your medical centre or out of hours service If youve established that you will need to get a new insulin pen as a matter of urgency, contact your health centre and arrange to get an emergency prescription which will speed up how quickly you can get a new insulin pen and new insulin if needed. If your medical centre is not open at the time, contact your out of hours service. If you are given an emergency prescription, you should be able to collect the insulin pen from any Continue reading >>

Traveling With Insulin

Traveling With Insulin

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you didn’t have to bother to refrigerate your insulin when you travel? I’m sure that in the past the need to have a refrigerator nearby kept many of us from adventure travel in the third world. Gel keeps insulin cool for 48 hours. While you do have to keep your insulin cool, you don’t have to strap a portable refrigerator to your back while you attempt your first ascent of Mt. Everest. Paddling down the Amazon can also be a bit inconvenient with a refrigerator. There are many more likely trips where you might think you need to have a refrigerator for your insulin. For example, I recently booked a short vacation in a cottage on Northern California’s Russian River. My wife, who uses both insulin cartridges and vials, insisted that we get a kitchenette so she could refrigerate the insulin. The kitchenette with its refrigerator wasn’t necessary, as we later realized. We could have used an insulin carrying case that included a cold pack. Our experience, however, had been only with those carrying cases that were tethered to refrigeration. The packs stay cold only until the ice in them melts, requiring repeated visits to the fridge. We were not familiar with a British company, Frio UK Ltd., which until recently had only limited representation in the United States. Frio’s cooling wallets keep insulin cool and safe for up to 45 hours—up to five times longer than ice packs—even if the temperature outside is 100°F. You activate the wallet by immersing it in cold water for 10 to 15 minutes. That makes the crystals in the panels of the wallet expand into a gel that will remain cool for several days with Frio’s patented process. Even though it makes use of evaporation to stay cool, the Frio wallet will remain dry to the touch after you Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin Pen Carrying Case- New Sealed In Bag | Ebay

Lantus Insulin Pen Carrying Case- New Sealed In Bag | Ebay

(estimated and based on current bid) To be provided at checkout help icon for Shipping - opens a layer This amount includes applicable customs duties, taxes, brokerage and other fees. This amount is subject to change until you make payment. For additional information, see the Global Shipping Program terms and conditions- opens in a new window or tab This amount includes applicable customs duties, taxes, brokerage and other fees. This amount is subject to change until you make payment. If you reside in an EU member state besides UK, import VAT on this purchase is not recoverable. For additional information, see the Global Shipping Program terms and conditions- opens in a new window or tab Estimated on or before Tue. Apr. 10 to help icon for Estimated delivery date - opens a layer Delivery time is estimated using our proprietary method which is based on the buyer's proximity to the item location, the shipping service selected, the seller's shipping history, and other factors. Delivery times may vary, especially during peak periods. Continue reading >>

Using The Calculator

Using The Calculator

The William Sansum Diabetes Center was founded in 1944 by Dr. William Sansum, the first physician in the United States to administer insulin to a person with diabetes. Our mission is the prevention, treatment, and cure of diabetes. www.diabetestravel.org was created in August 2015 as a free online resource for the diabetes community. Before setting off, we will walk you through the travel process with diabetes considerations in mindwhat to pack, letters for travel, airport security, beach day advice and more! Dr. David Kerr MD is the Director of Research and Innovation at the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, California. Dr. Kerr has decades of experience in the field of diabetes treatment and care, previously working as a Consultant Physician at the Bournemouth Diabetes and Endocrine Centre in the UK. www.diabetestravel.org is the second online resource he has created, www.excarbs.com is a sister site which focuses on exercise and insulin. Jenny Martinez is a Project Coordinator with the William Sansum Diabetes Center. She is a graduate of Westmont College and specializes for the Center on programs related to community behavioural change as well as diabetes and international travel. The development of this website was supported by the Mosher Foundation. We are committed to supporting travellers with diabetes around the globe. Contact us to share any questions you have, or suggestions to make the site more helpful! Continue reading >>

Air Travel & Your Rights

Air Travel & Your Rights

What are some general things to keep in mind when travelling by air? Remember that most airlines are more than happy to assist passengers with special needs – if you need help, speak to an airline staff representative. To avoid any unexpected delays, you can also make arrangements with the airline ahead of time, if you know in advance that you will require additional assistance at any point during your journey. Always be sure to give yourself plenty of time. The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) recommends that you go through pre-boarding security well in advance of your flight, especially during peak travel periods, in case any additional screening is required. Always carry appropriate snacks with you in case your flight or in-flight meal is delayed, or the meal provided does not have enough carbohydrates (for those using insulin or other medications that may cause hypoglycemia). For more information about security screening procedures, please see additional questions and answers below. Be aware of time zone changes and schedule your meals and medications accordingly. Meet with your healthcare team in advance of your trip to work out timing of meals and medications, if needed. Also discuss with your healthcare team what to do in case you get sick during your flight or while you’re on holiday. If you choose to sleep while travelling by air, set the alarm on your watch or cell phone to wake you at meal or medication time. Try to do some form of activity during your journey: walk around in the terminal prior to boarding, consider doing simple stretch exercises in your seat or move your ankles in circles and raise your legs occasionally, or move around periodically in the aisles to help stretch your legs. For more information on travelling with diabetes Continue reading >>

Traveling With Novolog

Traveling With Novolog

® It used to be that if you were living with diabetes and traveling with insulin, you needed to take a cooler with you. Luckily, things have changed. In fact, NovoLog® lasts up to 28 days without refrigeration after first use, so it can be taken almost anywhere. Once in use, NovoLog® FlexPen® and PenFill® cartridge must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 28 days. For more information on storing NovoLog®, click here. Here are a few tips for traveling with insulin: Take enough supplies and medication for your trip, plus extras in case you get delayed, lose something, or decide to stay longer If you are flying, make sure that you take your insulin and other diabetes medicines with you in your carry-on bag. Checked luggage can be kept in places that are too hot or cold for your insulin. And there is always the risk that it could get lost or delayed! When flying, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) does allow you to bring diabetes supplies with you on the plane. It is a good idea to let TSA agents know that you have diabetes and are carrying supplies with you (especially if you are wearing an insulin pump). Tell them before the screening process begins If you use an insulin pump, always take a backup source of insulin, such as NovoLog® FlexPen® or NovoPen Echo®, with you in case your pump stops working If you are taking a road trip, make sure not to leave your insulin in the trunk or glove compartment. Depending on the weather, your insulin can overheat or freeze. Either could make it ineffective Continue reading >>

Travelling With Medications That Have To Be Kept Cool

Travelling With Medications That Have To Be Kept Cool

Travelling with Medications that have to be kept cool - Air Travel Forum Travelling with Medications that have to be kept cool A friend of mines son has Diabetes and as such has to travel with his meds in his carry on. They will be going to Scotland in August and Im wondering what is the best and legitimate way to keep the Insulin cool for the flights. I have heard of everything from bags of ice that will melt enroute to the permanent Ice packs. Just wondering what others do that travel regularly with meds that have to be kept cold. Bear in mind that they also have to keep approximately 2 weeks worth cool so that they have enough while on their holiday. 1.Re: Travelling with Medications that have to be kept cool Why not ask the FA to keep it in the fridge in the galley? 2.Re: Travelling with Medications that have to be kept cool I work in a hospital. The Pharmacy suppiles our insulins to the medication refrigerator, but the bottles are labelled good for 28 days when stored at room temp; the CPS agrees (even for insulin glargine [Lantus] which we used to keep cool at all times). Your friend should double check with her Pharmacist, but I suspect that the insulin should be fine if not kept in a fridge whilst on board the plane. 3.Re: Travelling with Medications that have to be kept cool My son is diabetic and when we travelled to florida last year, we had an insulated travel bag that we bought from the internet, especially for carrying insulin. Also when we let the cabin crew know that he was diabetic the offered to keep his insulin in their fridge. 4.Re: Travelling with Medications that have to be kept cool I'm a lifelong diabetic and have used difference kinds of insulin. Never had a problem keeping them at room temp. for a few hours at a time. Check the patient informa Continue reading >>

Travel

Travel

Whether for work or pleasure, travel can and should be fun and having diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t travel. With good planning, your trip can be safe, fun and hassle-free whether you’re going interstate or overseas. While traveling: Make sure you eat well, consider how different foods will affect you Make sure you check your blood glucose levels regularly For people with type 1 diabetes - carry the right lollies with you (overseas brands may not be as strong) If you are flying, prepare for long delays or misplaced baggage (just in case!) If traveling overseas, time zones and extreme climates may affect you and how you manage your diabetes, talk to your doctor or diabetes educator Below is information on planning your trip, travel insurance, airport regulation, what to ask your doctor, tips on what to pack and flying. Planning your travel itinerary & bookings (Three Months Prior) Plan travel itinerary and make bookings If you wear an electronic device to monitor blood glucose levels or infuse insulin, check with the airline to see if these devices can be operated in-flight Arrange travel insurance for health and belongings Check vaccination requirements When booking your flights, you may choose to tell the airline you have diabetes. This will be passed on to the cabin crew who are trained in meeting your needs during the flight. In general, ‘diabetic’ meals served in-flight can be quite bland and no longer necessary. However you may choose to order meals that are low in saturated fat and high in fibre and carbohydrate at the time you make your bookings. Be sure to make arrangements in advance so that you comply with Australian airline security regulations specifically for people with diabetes. The regulations are: You must carry all diabetes supplies includin Continue reading >>

Diabetic Travel Cold Pack??

Diabetic Travel Cold Pack??

I was recently put on Lantus Solostar pen. I will need to take one or two pens with me. Once I use one I can keep it at room temp, but I need to keep them cold until then. Can someone recommend a good travel pouch that will keep it cold? ALSO.....we are driving straight down so about a 14-18 hr trip (which includes a few stops, lunch, dinner, gas. Most of the ones I saw will only keep cool for "up to 12 hrs." buffettgirl The whole tag thing, so 1990's internet. Not inexpensive but you could get one of those plug in coolers. We use the Frio for our opened bottles of insulin that need to be kept cool in hot weather. For bottles that are unopened and refrigerated I don't think it keeps them cold enough. The Frio site says that in 100 degree temp it will keep what is inside the bag at 79 degrees - fine for our opened bottles but not for the unopened ones. We use a cooler for those. Store new (unopened) vials in a refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F so the Frio is not cold enough. Opened lantus can be stored at temps no higher than 86 so it should work for that - if you need to carry it around with you for some reason. I realize you probably could just leave it in your hotel room generally, unless you do a split dose. We bring a small cooler. Keep the Lantus in a sealed Tupperware type container because as the ice melts, it will be messy. I have tried Ziploc bags and water still got in. You can keep it in there all week if you don't have a fridge. Sometimes we do even if we do in case the fridge is too cold and freezes things. You can dispose of your pen needles and lancets at the first aid centers in each park. A little OT, but I traveled last week last minute and ran low on pen needles. I get my refills at a local grocery store, but am transferring them to Target be Continue reading >>

Have Long-flight Long-stay Travel Coming Up W/insulin Pen

Have Long-flight Long-stay Travel Coming Up W/insulin Pen

Have long-flight long-stay travel coming up w/insulin pen Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Have long-flight long-stay travel coming up w/insulin pen I live in Hawaii, and I'm taking a trip in a couple of months; my travel time is from when I take my Lantus pens from the refrigerator until I can get them back into a refrigerator is close to 24 hours.(airplane 18 hours in two legs, layover and to/from airport another 5-6 hours total; and that's if I make the connection!) The trip is going to last 6 weeks, so I'll have multiple pens that need to stay cold (~56F), in addition to the pen that will be in use (<86F). I've been researching travel packs, and I found two that say they'll keep cold for 24 hours: Does anyone out there have any experience with these travel packs? You should be able to get ice at any restaurant in the airport to replenish the coldness in your insulin bag, and perhaps the airline wouldn't mind putting your pen bag in the fridge on board the plane.... A pen is supposed to be fine out of the fridge for a month. The problem with ice packs or ice is it will freeze the insulin. Freezing crystalizes it and makes it useless.. LocationSOUTHWEST< VA near the Va./Ky. border I would personally get an insulated lunch bag from E-bay or Walmart, you can insert an cold pack in that( My Mother gets her insulim pack in some kinda cold pack it doesnt freeze completely ;you just have to chill it before hand), I think theres a gel in them, I would try to see if the Walmart Pharmancy or maybe even E-Bay would have something similar. Pens can survive at room temp for at least 28 days. 24 hours on a plane before putting them bac Continue reading >>

€œmy Doctor Says I Need A Diabetes Travel Plan...â€

€œmy Doctor Says I Need A Diabetes Travel Plan...â€

How Will This Help? “My Doctor Says I Need a Diabetes Travel Plan...†BD Getting Started™ Travel,Vacations andDiabetes 2 3 Your Guide to Traveling With Diabetes • Remember that meals may not be served at times that fit into your usual schedule of meals. (Depending on the airline, a meal may not be served and a snack may not be offered if a flight is less than four hours.) — Order any special meal requests in advance. — Keep snacks that will not spoil in your carry-on bag (to help avoid poor food choices and long waiting lines at airport restaurants). Before You Order Food or Begin Your Meal • Think ahead to avoid overeating – especially on cruise ships or with “all-you-can-eat†buffets. • Keep track of carbohydrate-containing foods – essential for blood glucose control. (See Carbohydrate Food Sources, page 4) • Use a smaller plate to help keep portion sizes under control. Rely on simple measurements to decide on food portions (See “Measuring By Hand†Examples, page 4). • Ask how foods are prepared so you can make better choices. Drinks That Contain Alcohol • Do not drink alcohol on an empty stomach – this can lead to low blood glucose. • Avoid sugar-based drinks/mixers like fruit and fruit juice drinks with large amounts of carbohydrates – they may affect blood glucose control. • Do not drink and drive! — Never get behind the wheel unless you know your blood glucose is within a safe range. — Check your blood glucose at regular intervals if you are driving a long distance. Taking a trip can be stressful due to the changes you will make in your daily routine. These may include different food choices, and more or less exercise than usu Continue reading >>

Any Tips On Traveling (road Trip) With Insulin?

Any Tips On Traveling (road Trip) With Insulin?

any tips on traveling (road trip) with insulin? any tips on traveling (road trip) with insulin? How do I keep it cold? i mean, i can use a cooler, but wouldn't it be hard to keep such a tiny bottle cold, even in the smallest cooler, would need to keep alot of ice? we'll be on the road about 3 hours at a time. The other times, we'll be in a hotel with a fridge. Thanks everyone!! you wet the bag, and that allows for passive cooling of the insulin in the bag........ you do not place the bag in the sun, keep it in a cool/shaded spot Hi, PoohBear! I assume you're using a bottle of something plus syringes? For a three hour trip, just put the bottle inside a zip lock bag and lay it ON TOP of your cooler, if you have one. IF not, you might want to wrap the bottle in an old washcloth, and shove it into the zip lock bag with icecubes to fill it up. IF you're looking for something different, you might get yourself one of those itty bitty coolers (the kind the kids keep a 6 pack of soda, or beer! in) and put it in there. IF the sodas are cold, that should do the trick. The real problem comes at a hotel. Even the least expensive generally provide free ice. If you get one of those disposable coolers, the expanded polystyrene will kill the planet kind, you can put it in there, or even in the "ice bucket" that most hotels provide. How do I keep it cold? i mean, i can use a cooler, but wouldn't it be hard to keep such a tiny bottle cold, even in the smallest cooler, would need to keep alot of ice? we'll be on the road about 3 hours at a time. The other times, we'll be in a hotel with a fridge. Thanks everyone!! TIP: accidently freezing your insulin, even for a short time, is FAR worse than leaving it at room temperature for MONTHS. Those little tiny fridges in hotel rooms often will fr Continue reading >>

Free Insulin Travel Kit From Lantus - Deals, Coupons, Free Stuff - - City-data Forum

Free Insulin Travel Kit From Lantus - Deals, Coupons, Free Stuff - - City-data Forum

Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search Lantus Connection | Help Managing Blood Sugar with Lantus (- broken link) i got this in the mail today but my insulin bottles dont fit guess they only fit lantus bottles of insulin . Oh well I tried . thanks anyways . i got this in the mail today but my insulin bottles dont fit guess they only fit lantus bottles of insulin . Oh well I tried . thanks anyways . I didn't realize the bottles came in various sizes. Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned. Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com . Continue reading >>

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