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Diabetes Screening & Counseling

Diabetes Screening & Counseling

What is diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It is a health condition that affects how the body uses glucose, the main type of sugar in the blood. The glucose level in the blood rises after eating a meal and causes the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the blood stream. For patients with diabetes, the body either can't make or respond to insulin properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood instead of going into cells as it should. As a result, blood sugar levels in the blood are higher than normal and can lead to damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. While the exact cause of diabetes is not known, obesity and lack of physical activity are two of the most common risk factors for the disease. People with type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms for many years. Early symptoms of diabetes may include blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, pain or numbness in the feet or hands, infections that are more frequent or heal slowly, fatigue, hunger, increased thirst and urination. Blood tests are needed to confirm the diagnosis. What is diabetes screening & counseling? Diabetes screening & counseling is a service designed to measure a patient's risk for diabetes. For most accurate results, it is recommended that you fast for 9-12 hours before testing. During this visit, we will record the patient's age, height, weight and waist circumference, as well as medical, family, and social history information. After this, a blood test will be performed by obtaining a small blood sample from the patient's finger to measure blood sugar levels. Based on the results of these screenings we will counsel the patient on their risk factors and recommend lifestyle changes to help the patient lead a healt Continue reading >>

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Most people with diabetes need to check their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. The results help you and your doctor manage those levels, which helps you avoid diabetes complications. There are several ways to test your blood sugar: From Your Fingertip: You prick your finger with a small, sharp needle (called a lancet) and put a drop of blood on a test strip. Then you put the test strip into a meter that shows your blood sugar level. You get results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. Some meters can tell you your average blood sugar level over a period of time and show you charts and graphs of your past test results. You can get blood sugar meters and strips at your local pharmacy. Meters That Test Other Sites: Newer meters let you test sites other than your fingertip, such as your upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. You may get different results than from your fingertip. Blood sugar levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other testing sites. This is especially true when your blood sugar is rapidly changing, like after a meal or after exercise. If you are checking your sugar when you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should use your fingertip if possible, because these readings will be more accurate. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: These devices, also called interstitial glucose measuring devices, are combined with insulin pumps. They are similar to finger-stick glucose results and can show patterns and trends in your results over time. You may need to check your blood sugar several times a day, such as before meals or exercise, at bedtime, before driving, and when you think your blood sugar levels are low. Everyone is different, so ask your doctor when and how often you should chec Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Testing And Healthy Heart Screenings

Free Diabetes Testing And Healthy Heart Screenings

Please see the schedule below for upcoming Healthcare Clinics including: Diabetes Testing and Healthy Heart Screenings • Our Diabetes Testing measures your A1C levels. Your A1C is a measure of your average blood sugar over the previous 3 months. This test requires only a small amount of blood and no fasting. • Our Healthy Heart screenings offer a risk assessment for heart disease, a lipid-stick profile test and a blood pressure check. All screenings are available at the pharmacy for FREE. For people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart disease and their families For people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart disease and their families Continue reading >>

Genetic Testing For Neonatal Diabetes

Genetic Testing For Neonatal Diabetes

Genetic testing for neonatal diabetes is provided free of charge through funding from the Wellcome Trust (until at least 2020). This applies to all patients with diabetes diagnosed before 9 months of age anywhere in the world and regardless of their current age. Before sending a sample, please complete the form belowelectronically and email it to [email protected] . This will allow us to pre-log the patient on our database and start the test as soon as the sample is received. Please include samples from both parents whenever possible whether affected or unaffected. Testing of parental samples is often key to obtain a genetic diagnosis since the majority of mutations causing neonatal diabetes are found to have arisen spontaneously in patients. Samples must be labelled with name and date of birth. Please send either 3-5 ml of blood (our preferred option) taken in tubes containing EDTA and transported fresh (not frozen) at room temperature to arrive in the UK within 5 days. Blood samples should be sent in leak-proof packaging and include absorbent material to absorb any leakage.OR Send 2-10 micrograms of DNA at room temperature. Again please make sure the tube is very securely sealed. Additional DNA will help us to test for further causes of neonatal diabetes. The samples and a printed copy of the neonatal diabetes request form (link) should be sent to: Prof Sian Ellard, Department of Molecular Genetics, RILD Level 3, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Barrack Road, Exeter, EX2 5DW, UK When the samples are delivered to the Exeter laboratory, you will receive an automated email confirming samples receipt. The samples will be first tested for the most common causes of neonatal diabetes (mutations in the ABCC8, KCNJ11 , and INS genes) by Sanger sequencing, u Continue reading >>

Diabetes Practice Questions

Diabetes Practice Questions

1. The risk factors for type 1 diabetes include all of the following except: a. Diet b. Genetic c. Autoimmune d. Environmental 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately what percentage of all cases of diabetes in adults? a. 55%-60% b. 35%-40% c. 90-95% d. 25-30% 3. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include all of the following except: a. Advanced age b. Obesity c. Smoking d. Physical inactivity 4. What percentage of women with gestational diabetes is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes following pregnancy? a. 25%-30% b. 5%-10% c. <5% d. 20%-25% 5. Untreated diabetes may result in all of the following except: a. Blindness b. Cardiovascular disease c. Kidney disease d. Tinnitus 6. Prediabetes is associated with all of the following except: a. Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes b. Impaired glucose tolerance c. Increased risk of heart disease and stroke d. Increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes 7. Diabetics are at increased risk of heart disease if they also: a. Smoke b. Have high HDL cholesterol levels c. Take aspirin d. Consume a high-fiber diet 8. Blood sugar is well controlled when Hemoglobin A1C is: a. Below 7% b. Between 12%-15% c. Less than 180 mg/dL d. Between 90 and 130 mg/dL 9. Excessive thirst and volume of very dilute urine may be symptoms of: a. Urinary tract infection b. Diabetes insipidus c. Viral gastroenteritis d. Hypoglycemia 10. Among female children and adolescents, the first sign of type 1 diabetes may be: a. Rapid weight gain b. Constipation c. Genital candidiasis d. Insomnia 11. Untreated hyperglycemia may lead to all of the following complications except: a. Hyperosmolar syndrome b Vitiligo c. Diabetic ketoacidosis d. Coma 12. Hyperinsulinemia may be caused by all of the following except: a. An insulinoma b. Nesidioblastosis c. Insulin Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Signs That Indicate You May Be In Danger Of Diabetes

10 Diabetic Signs That Indicate You May Be In Danger Of Diabetes

There’s no way to sugarcoat the fact that diabetes is a major danger. This health condition occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin or is unable to process it properly. This causes blood sugar levels to spike and become much higher than normal. And having high blood sugar levels can lead to many serious health problems, such as heart disease, kidney damage, stroke, blindness, and others. Studies show that 24 million people in the U.S. suffer from diabetes, but nearly 6 million people have no idea that they have the condition. Yet there are many diabetic signs that can help you detect the disease. To help you be proactive and protect your family’s health, discover which diabetic symptoms may signal a possible problem. 3 Types of Diabetes There are different kinds of diabetes and it’s important to know their differences to understand your risk. They fall into the following types: Type 1 Diabetes: This is an autoimmune disease that was previously called juvenile diabetes because its diabetic symptoms are often detected in childhood. It occurs when the immune system destroys the cells that produce insulin, which leaves the body with too little or no insulin. Type 2 Diabetes: This is the most common type of diabetes and it typically develops in adulthood. It either occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels or when the cells become unable to use insulin properly. Gestational Diabetes: This affects 5 to10 percent of women during or after pregnancy. 10 Diabetic Symptoms That May Indicate a Problem Millions of people are struggling with diabetes and don’t even know it because many of its symptoms are simply overlooked. But by detecting signs of a problem, you can manage the disease before it leads to other conditions. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Screening Test

Diabetes Screening Test

If you are human, leave this field blank. Diabetes is a dangerous and life-threatening disease. Are you the 1 in 4 at major risk of developing diabetes? Early identification of your risk is the first step to prevention of diabetes and/or its complications. This simple Q and A helps assess your risk for having or developing diabetes but is not intended to replace an examination by your physician! The signs and symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can be so mild that you might not even notice them. I of every 3 people with diabetes dont even know it! When symptoms do occur the type and severity vary from person to person and include: Increased Thirst and/or Increased Urination Increased Hunger (especially after eating) Numbness or Tingling in feet, hands or legs Slow healing Sores or Frequent Infections I have an inactive lifestyle exercise less than 3 times a week I have a family history of diabetes parent or sibling Minority races in the USA have a higher incidence of diabetes. Do you identify yourself as a minority? I have hypertension or high blood pressure I have abnormal cholesterol levels Low HDL, High LDL or triglycerides I have a history of cardiovascular disease I have had diabetes during pregnancy or had a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds at birth I have a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women only I have areas of darkened skin (Acanthosis Nigricans) dark velvety patches around neck or armpits On previous testing, I had prediabetes, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Continue reading >>

Should You Get A Free Type 2 Diabetes Screening?

Should You Get A Free Type 2 Diabetes Screening?

Free screenings for diabetes are sometimes available at pharmacies, and even in big-box stores, like Walmart. You may also be able to get a free blood sugar test at your local hospital. But before you go, it’s important to understand the limitations of this blood sugar test. "In most cases, the diabetic test given at a free screening is a point-of-care blood sugar test," says Shannon Knapp, RN, CDE, manager of diabetes education in the department of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. These tests measure blood sugar with a finger prick and a glucose monitor. "Free screenings for diabetes are beneficial but have a lower accuracy rate than lab tests done in a doctor's office," Knapp notes. "They may be given at health fairs, community centers, or local pharmacies, but they are not a substitute for your primary care doctor." There are reasons that free screenings for diabetes may be an early indicator of the disease but still don’t provide a complete picture on their own. "To diagnose diabetes, you generally need two elevated fasting blood sugars," explains Knapp. "It's important to know that if you have free screening for diabetes without fasting, the results are not very useful. Any abnormal diabetic test needs to be followed up with your doctor." Why Get a Free Diabetes Screening? The purpose of this type of screening is to serve as an early alert, hopefully cutting down on the damage done by type 2 diabetes by uncovering it and addressing it early, before you have any complications of high blood sugar. Also, "These screenings have the potential to catch other types of diabetes," adds Knapp. Since more than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and another 86 million are at risk for the disease, early diagnosis is more important th Continue reading >>

Skin Patch Shows Promise For Pain-free Diabetes Testing

Skin Patch Shows Promise For Pain-free Diabetes Testing

An experimental device might one day literally take the pain out of managing diabetes, Korean researchers say. The new invention uses a patch to monitor blood sugar levels via sweat, and delivers the diabetes drug metformin through the skin with microneedles. "Diabetics are reluctant to monitor their blood glucose levels because of the painful blood-gathering process," said study author Hyunjae Lee, from Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. "We highly focused on a noninvasive monitoring and therapy system for diabetics." The findings were published online March 21 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The study team was led by Dae-Hyeong Kim, at Seoul National University. Funding for the study was provided by the Institute for Basic Science in the Republic of Korea. Currently, people with diabetes have two options for monitoring blood sugar (glucose) levels, said Richard Guy, who wrote an accompanying editorial in the journal. He's a professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom. One option is a blood glucose meter that requires a finger stick to draw out a drop of blood for testing. The other option is continuous glucose monitoring, which requires that a sensor be placed underneath the skin and worn constantly. Both of these options are invasive and can be painful. Previously, a less invasive product called GlucoWatch pulled fluid through the skin to the device to measure blood sugar levels. However, that device was never commercially successful and was taken off the market, Guy said. The Korean research team used a substance called graphene to develop a thin, flexible patch. Graphene conducts electricity, and can be transparent, soft and very thin, the researchers explained. The patch also contains a variety of sen Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Abbott Builds On Needle-free Diabetes Testing With Data Sharing App

Abbott Builds On Needle-free Diabetes Testing With Data Sharing App

Abbott builds on needle-free diabetes testing with data sharing app Abbott has launched a new smartphone app which allows users of its glucose meter to share readings with family or friends. The new LibreLink app allow caregivers and parents to receive glucose readings on their Android smartphone whenever a loved one or child scans a FreeStyle Libresensor. Abbott is one of the main players in the multi-billion dollar glucose testing market, which is undergoing rapid digital development. Patients with diabetes are recommended to test their blood glucose four times a day, creating a considerable burden on children and adolescents and older people in particular. Among the most significant products to reach the market in recent times is Abbotts FreeStyle Libre sensor, which does away with testing blood with lancets and test strips. Instead the FreeStyle Libre is a digital sensor worn on the skin and measures interstitial glucose levels. Launched in Europe in 2014, the device is seen as a huge advance on having to use fingerprick testing, and now the LibreLink app exploits the digital data generated by the device. Abbotts own survey of 600 parents across Europe confirmed that parents of children with diabetes often worry about their childs blood glucose testing when they are away from them. More than half of parents worry their child will not test their glucose levels often enough when they are away, with 42% worry their child will have a potentially dangerous episode of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia. Developed in partnership with Newyu, the device allows caregivers to keep in touch with their loved ones and remotely monitor their glucose levels, and will send automated notifications when a loved ones readings are too high or too low. The introduction of the FreeStyle Lib Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Pathway To Prevention

Pathway To Prevention

If you have a relative with T1D, you’re in a unique position to help us learn more about the disease and how to stop it. The first step is to sign up for Pathway to Prevention screening to determine your risk of developing T1D. About the Study Pathway to Prevention screening is the first step for all TrialNet prevention studies. Screening is offered free to relatives of people with T1D to evaluate their personal risk of developing the disease. This unique screening can identify the early stages of T1D years before any symptoms appear. It also helps researchers learn more about how T1D develops and plan new studies exploring ways to prevent it. • Relatives of people with T1D are 15 times more likely to develop the disease than the general population. • Increased risk of developing T1D is linked to the presence of five diabetes-related autoantibodies. • The JDRF, ADA and Endocrine Society now classify having two or more of these autoantibodies as early stage T1D. Eligibility Requirements Who can participate? You qualify for free risk screening if you: • are between the ages of 1 and 45 and have a parent, brother/sister, or child with T1D (ages 3-45 in the United Kingdom) • are between the ages of 1 and 20 and have an aunt/uncle, cousin, grandparent, niece/nephew, or half-brother/sister with T1D (ages 3-20 in the United Kingdom) • have not been diagnosed with diabetes Participant Experience What is required? With the advanced screening offered in this study, you will learn if you are in the early stages of T1D. Almost all people who screen positive for two or more diabetes-related autoantibodies will develop T1D. Detecting the disease in its earliest stage gives you the opportunity to try to change the course of the disease. TrialNet offers clinical trials te Continue reading >>

Label-free Leukocyte Sorting And Impedance-based Profiling For Diabetes Testing.

Label-free Leukocyte Sorting And Impedance-based Profiling For Diabetes Testing.

Biosens Bioelectron. 2018 Oct 30;118:195-203. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2018.07.052. Epub 2018 Jul 26. Label-free leukocyte sorting and impedance-based profiling for diabetes testing. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3, Singapore 639798, Singapore. Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 11 Mandalay Road, Clinical Sciences Building Level 11, Singapore 308232, Singapore. Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (ASTAR), 8A Biomedical Grove, Immunos, Singapore 138648, Singapore. Endocrinology Department, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore 308433, Singapore. Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (ASTAR), 8A Biomedical Grove, Immunos, Singapore 138648, Singapore; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117545, Singapore. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3, Singapore 639798, Singapore. Electronic address: [email protected] School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3, Singapore 639798, Singapore; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 11 Mandalay Road, Clinical Sciences Building Level 11, Singapore 308232, Singapore. Electronic address: [email protected] Circulating leukocytes comprise of approximately 1% of all blood cells and efficient enrichment of these cells from whole blood is critical for understanding cellular heterogeneity and biological significance in health and diseases. In this work, we report a novel microfluidic strategy for rapid (< Continue reading >>

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