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Free Diabetes Information Booklet

Diabetes | Nutrition.gov

Diabetes | Nutrition.gov

HHS. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases HHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Division of Diabetes Translation Learn the basics about diabetes from the Center for Disease Control. Also find: HHS. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Read about the symptoms, causes, and management of diabetes, as well as how you can prevent it. HHS. National Institutes of Health. National Library of Medicine Read information related to diabetes, including a definition, causes and risk factors, symptoms, treatments, complications, and more. Also in Spanish . What I need to know about Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes HHS. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Learn about the carbohydrates in the foods you eat and, if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, use this meal planning tool to help you stay healthy. Also in Spanish . HHS. National Institutes of Health. National Diabetes Education Program Learn about type 2 diabetes including the risks, complications, and prevention strategies. Also in Spanish . HHS. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Education Program HHS. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Education Program Learn more about the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. HHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Get answers to frequently asked questions about diabetes and pregnancy. HHS. National Institutes of Health. Nation Continue reading >>

With Diabetes

With Diabetes

Living Well With Diabetes is an interactive, online tool that patients can use to access information and practical tips to help them live well with diabetes. Created by Krames® Patient Education in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association and sponsored by Merck as part of the Journey for Control Program, Living Well With Diabetes includes chapters on Understanding diabetes Monitoring blood sugar Getting the right health care Understanding medications Learning about food and diabetes Getting active and exercising safely Throughout the guide, patients are able to interact with features that help them make the most of what they learn, such as Videos and animations Audio versions of the page information Printable materials Instant definitions of terms Quizzes at the end of each chapter Continue reading >>

Be Active When You Have Diabetes

Be Active When You Have Diabetes

Being active can help you take care of your diabetes. 1 Better mood Lowered stress Less body fat Strong blood vessels Strong bones Better insulin use Strong heart Strong muscles Flexible joints Regular physical activity helps your body and mind. 2 Physical activity can help you lower your chance of having diabetes problems. 3 Talk with your health care team before you start to exercise. Learn what kinds of physical activity are best for you. Learn how to plan meals around your physical activity. 4 Daily activity Aerobic exercise Strength training Stretching Four kinds of physical activity are important. 5 Daily Activity Be extra active every day. 6 Work in the garden. Ways I can be more active: 8 Aerobic Exercise Do some aerobic exercise almost every day. 9 Take a brisk walk. Start with 10 minutes. Work your way up to 30 minutes a day. 10 Dance. Some kinds of aerobic exercise I might enjoy: 11 Strength Training Keep your muscles strong with strength training. Do strength training three times a week. 12 You can do strength training at home, at a fitness center, or in a class. Types of strength training I might like: 13 Stretching Stretch to feel better. 14 Everyone can stretch. Types of stretching I can do each day: 15 Remember: Being active can help you take care of your diabetes! Regular physical activity can l help you with your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels l lower your chance of having diabetes problems Four kinds of physical activity are important: l Daily activity l Aerobic exercise l Strength training l Stretching 16 Get started! 3 Talk with your health care team. 3 Make a plan. 3 Find an exercise buddy. 17 What to Ask Your Health Care Team Should I change my medicine or my meals? When should I take my prescription medicine? How much should Continue reading >>

Downloading And Ordering Leaflets

Downloading And Ordering Leaflets

Home Publications Downloading and Ordering Leaflets The leaflets listed below are available as PDFs for you to download just click the link and save the PDF to your computer. Scroll down or click here to order printed leaflets. IDDT provides a wide range of information which has been written to meet the needs of people with diabetes, their carers and health care professionals. This publication list has been compiled so you can order what you need free of charge. Simply state how many copies or items you require, fill in your address in the space provided and submit your order to IDDT. IDDT runs purely on voluntary donations and all the information we produce is free. If you would like to help us continue to provide this valuable information to people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes please send us a donation via Just Giving or Charity Choice . Healthcare professionals ordering multiple copies All IDDT booklets and leaflets will remain free of charge. We are delighted that healthcare professionals and others are ordering multiple copies of our booklets and leaflets to give to people with diabetes and grateful for the help and support being given to people with diabetes in this way. Continue reading >>

Patient Booklets - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Patient Booklets - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

NCEC NATIONAL CLINICAL GUIDELINE NO. 17 ADULT TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS On the 25th of June 2018, the Minister for Health will launch the first National Clinical Guideline for Adults living with Type 1 Diabetes. The publication of the guideline will see an agreed framework that will ensure all adults with type 1 diabetes regardless of where they live in Ireland, have equitable access to high quality care. The guideline will also act as a driver to standardise type 1 diabetes care nationally. This booklet contains general information on Type 1 diabetes. It is for adults living with Type 1 diabetes and aims to support you in managing your type 1 diabetes well on a daily basis. The contents are divided into three sections, an introduction to Type 1 diabetes, ongoing care of Type 1 Diabetes and Living well with Type 1 diabetes. You can dip into the different sections of the booklet as they apply to you and it will be an additional resource for you when managing your diabetes. This is your one stop Type 2 diabetes information booklet covering daily management, health eating guidelines, physical activity recommendations, preparing for your diabetes appointments, medications, entitlements and other lifestyle issues. The complete reference guide and essential reading for all people with Type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Free Guide To Diabetes And Reproductive Health For Girls

Free Guide To Diabetes And Reproductive Health For Girls

Free Guide to Diabetes and Reproductive Health for Girls Girls have a new resource for understanding the relationship between diabetes and their changing bodies. A free booklet, Diabetes and Reproductive Health for Girls, is now available from the American Diabetes Association. The guide helps girls with diabetes learn about changes in their bodies as they mature. It covers topics such as puberty, menstruation, sex, birth control, and pregnancy. In terms of diabetes management, changes in hormones and the sexual organs before and during puberty can impact blood glucose levels. And girls may have fears about their abilitysomedayto have a healthy pregnancy. Fortunately, research has helped to allay some of those fears. Researcher Denise Charron-Prochownik, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, a professor at the University of Pittsburghs School of Nursing and Graduate School of Public Health, received an Association grant to develop a preconception counseling program for teen girls. We wanted to let them know how diabetes affects pregnancy, how pregnancy affects diabetes, how diabetes affects sexualityall of the information women need to plan a pregnancy and prevent an unplanned pregnancy, she says. The new brochure was adapted from that program, READY GIRLS! (Reproductive Health Education & Awareness of Diabetes in Youth for Girls), with permission from the University of Pittsburgh. For a free copy of the booklet, call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383). Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Table of Contents Click on any of the links below to access helpful materials on managing all aspects of diabetes that can be printed and given to your patients . Introductory Information 1. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., insulin) 2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., medications) 3. Women and Diabetes: Eating and weight, pregnancy, and heart disease 4. Men and Diabetes: Sexual Issues and employment concerns 5. Diabetes and Your Lifestyle: Exercise, traveling, employment, sexual issues, and special considerations for the elderly General Self-Care (e.g., Blood Glucose, Foot Care) Blood Glucose 6. Pass This Test: Testing blood glucose levels 7. Get off the Blood Glucose Rollercoaster: High/low blood sugar symptoms and treatment A. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Oral Meds): Patient log to record levels B. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Insulin Meds): Patient log to monitor levels Feet 8. Foot Care for People with Diabetes: Hygiene, inspection, and when to call your physician C. TOOL: Foot Care Log Patient log to record self-inspections and any problem areas D. TOOL: Injection Sites Patient log to help rotate injection sites Exercise E. TOOL: Planning Your Exercise: Guide to help patients design an exercise program F. TOOL: Physical Activity Log: Patient log to record physical activity 9. Exercise in Disguise Finding ways to exercise at home and outside of the gym 10. Exercising Like Your Life Depends on It: Health benefits to exercising 11. Hot Weather Exercise: Taking extra care when exercising in hot weather Nutrition/Health Diet/Weight Loss 12. Managing Type 2 Diabetes through Diet: Suggestions for balancing your diet 13. Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes: Weight loss be Continue reading >>

Free Guide To Diabetes And Reproductive Health For Girls

Free Guide To Diabetes And Reproductive Health For Girls

Free Guide to Diabetes and Reproductive Health for Girls Girls have a new resource for understanding the relationship between diabetes and their changing bodies. A free booklet, Diabetes and Reproductive Health for Girls, is now available from the American Diabetes Association. The guide helps girls with diabetes learn about changes in their bodies as they mature. It covers topics such as puberty, menstruation, sex, birth control, and pregnancy. In terms of diabetes management, changes in hormones and the sexual organs before and during puberty can impact blood glucose levels. And girls may have fears about their abilitysomedayto have a healthy pregnancy. Fortunately, research has helped to allay some of those fears. Researcher Denise Charron-Prochownik, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, a professor at the University of Pittsburghs School of Nursing and Graduate School of Public Health, received an Association grant to develop a preconception counseling program for teen girls. We wanted to let them know how diabetes affects pregnancy, how pregnancy affects diabetes, how diabetes affects sexualityall of the information women need to plan a pregnancy and prevent an unplanned pregnancy, she says. The new brochure was adapted from that program, READY GIRLS! (Reproductive Health Education & Awareness of Diabetes in Youth for Girls), with permission from the University of Pittsburgh. For a free copy of the booklet, call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383). Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Leaflets

Diabetes Information Leaflets

We publish a series of professionally authored leaflets on diabetes and related health which are freely available as pdf download, audio file or as hard copy upon request. DRWF is committed to providing quality and relevant patient information for all people with diabetes. We have achieved Department of Health Information Standard accreditation on the Diabetes Wellness News and patient information leaflet series, which assures readers that our information is trustworthy and reliable. In line with this commitment we review and update all publications covered by the scope of the Standard as necessary to ensure they are fit for purpose. Each leaflet's review date is clearly printed on its back page. Source references are available on request. Leaflets are available to download. If you are having problems viewing them you can download Adobe Acrobat Reader here for free. To make our information leaflets as accessible as possible, you can also play them as audio files below. Audio versions are subject to the same rigorous production procedures as the printed versions above, so you can be assured of their quality. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Your browser does not support the audio element. Healthcare Professionals Waiting Room Order Form Your browser does not support the audio element. Leaflets can be ordered individually or as a series by sending a C5-sized SAE stamped to "large letter" value to DRWF, Building 6000, L Continue reading >>

Premier Diabetes Education For Northern Virginia And Washington Dc Region - Inova

Premier Diabetes Education For Northern Virginia And Washington Dc Region - Inova

TheInova Center for Wellness and Metabolic Healthoffers comprehensive diabetes education classes, programs and support groups at Inova facilities throughout Northern Virginia. With easy access to the Washington, DC metro area, we have counseled thousands of adults and children withdiabetes whohave learned to lead better, healthier lives. Our certified diabetes educators, nurses and dietitians work with your physician. As a team we empower you to manage your diabetes and improve your health and quality of life. Physicians: learn about Inova's services and team management approach. Whether you are newly diagnosed or have lived with diabetes for many years, we have education, classes and services appropriate for you. Call us at 1-877-511-GOAL (4625) for more information. We are proud that Inova's diabetes programs have been recognized by the American Diabetes Association for Quality Self-Management Education. MyChart is a free online service offered to Inova patients, providing personalized and secure online access to portions of their medical records. Anyone with an Inova provider can sign up for MyChart (some restrictions apply to patients under the age of 18). Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

NEW! Introducing 40 Educational Handouts on Using Insulin Low Literacy and Very Low Literacy Versions Available ACU and the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation announce the release of 40 educational handouts for patients who are starting insulin. Each handout is written in easy to understand language with simple illustrations. The handouts are available in both English and Spanish and two literacy levels: low literacy and very low literacy. The handouts are free to download and distribute. Using Insulin to Treat Your Diabetes: What It Means for You English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) About Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Insulin Syringes and Pens English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Injecting Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Needle Safety English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Managing Daily Doses of Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Measuring Your Blood Sugar English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Tracking Blood Sugar Results English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Diet and Exercise English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Travel Tips English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (P Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes, it is vital that you have your eyes checked regularly. Damage to the retina at the back of the eye (retinopathy) is a common complication of diabetes. If left untreated, it can become worse and cause some loss of vision, or total loss of vision (severe sight impairment) in severe cases. Good control of blood sugar (glucose) and blood pressure slows down the progression of retinopathy. Treatment with a laser, before the retinopathy becomes severe, can often prevent loss of vision. What is diabetic retinopathy? The term retinopathy covers various disorders of the retina, which can affect vision. Retinopathy is usually due to damage to the tiny blood vessels in the retina. Retinopathy is commonly caused by diabetes but is sometimes caused by other diseases such as very high blood pressure (hypertension). Note: people with diabetes also have a higher risk of developing other eye problems, including cataracts and glaucoma. How does diabetic retinopathy occur? Over several years, a high blood sugar (glucose) level can weaken and damage the tiny blood vessels in the retina. This can result in various problems which include: Small blow-out swellings of blood vessels (microaneurysms). Small leaks of fluid from damaged blood vessels (exudates). Small bleeds from damaged blood vessels (haemorrhages). Blood vessels may just become blocked. This can cut off the blood and oxygen supply to small sections of the retina. New abnormal blood vessels may grow from damaged blood vessels. This is called proliferative retinopathy. These new vessels are delicate and can bleed easily. The leaks of fluid, bleeds and blocked blood vessels may damage the cells of the retina. In some severe cases, damaged blood vessels bleed into the jelly-like centre of the eye (the vitreous Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes E-books From Novo Nordisk

Free Diabetes E-books From Novo Nordisk

Interested in learning more about how to manage your diabetes? Then you’ll want to check out a series of free e-books from pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk. The five-book series covers a range of topics, including diabetes basics, diabetes drugs, and carbohydrate counting and meal planning. After completing a free registration to join the Novo Nordisk Cornerstones4Care program, the books can be downloaded to an iPad, Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, or computer. For more information, or to download your copy of the diabetes e-books, click here. This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell. Continue reading >>

About Diabetes: Are You At Risk?

About Diabetes: Are You At Risk?

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which your body cannot regulate sugar. It occurs if your body does not make insulin or cannot use it very well. Insulin is a hormone that controls how much sugar is in your blood. Blood sugar is also called “glucose.” A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. Diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be well managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Many people live a long, active life with diabetes. Are there different types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes — type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin. Type 1 usually starts when you are a child or young adult, but it can happen at any age. About 5 to 10 percent of all people with diabetes have type 1. It is treated with: Taking daily insulin shots or using an insulin pump Healthy eating Physical activity Type 2 diabetes With type 2 diabetes, your body makes insulin but cannot use it well. Type 2 usually starts when you are over age 40, but it is becoming more common in younger people. In fact, many young people and children are developing type 2 nowadays. About 90 to 95% of all people with diabetes have type 2. It is the most common type of diabetes. It is often associated with being overweight and tends to run in families. Initially, type 2 diabetes may be treated with exercise, weight control, and a healthier diet. If these are not enough to control blood sugar, pills or insulin may be needed. Am I at risk for diabetes? Anyone can get diabetes. However, you have a higher risk for diabetes if you are: Overweight Inactive (exercise less than three times a week) African-American/Black, American Indian, Alaskan Native, Hispanic, Pacific Islander or Asian Age 45 or older Have Continue reading >>

Free Patient Education Material

Free Patient Education Material

The materials on this website (brochures, food guides, pocket guides etc.) may be reproduced and disseminated in any media in its original format, without modification, for informational, educational and non-commercial purposes only. A nominal sum to cover costs of reproduction and distribution can be assessed. Any modification or use of the materials in any derivative work is prohibited without prior permission of the California Department of Public Health; Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Division. This material is here to help you manage your gestational diabetes. You may download and/or print as needed. However, this material is copyrighted and should not be modified in any manner. Unless otherwise specified, all documents in this section are PDFs. None of these materials are meant to take the place of professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Continue reading >>

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