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Category:deaths From Diabetes

Category:deaths From Diabetes

This is a list of noteworthy people who died from diabetes-related complications. This is a list of noteworthy people who died from diabetes-related complications. This is a list of noteworthy people who died from diabetes-related complications. Continue reading >>

Frank Hu

Frank Hu

Hu presenting at a meeting of the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee in 2014 Frank B. Hu, or HU Bingchang (Chinese: 胡丙长) (born in 1966), is a Chinese American nutrition and diabetes researcher. He is a Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,[1] (formerly Harvard School of Public Health, as HSPH) and Professor of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School. He became the Chair of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in January 2017. Dr. Hu is also the Director of the Epidemiology and Genetics Core of the Boston Obesity Nutrition Research Center;[2] and Co-Director of the Program in Obesity Epidemiology and Prevention[3] at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Hu was elected into the National Academy of Medicine (NAM)[4] in October 2015, one of the highest honours in the fields of health and medicine. Education[edit] A native of Hubei Province, China, Dr. Hu received his M.D. from the Tongji Medical University (now Tongji Medical School of the Huazhong University of Science and Technology) in Wuhan in 1988, and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1996. Research[edit] Dr. Hu’s research has focused on diet/lifestyle, metabolic, and genetic determinants of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). His group has conducted detailed analyses of many dietary and lifestyle factors and risk of diabetes and CVD, including sugar-sweetened beverages, coffee,[5][6][7] red meat,[8][9] saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, iron,[10] and dietary patterns.[11][12][13] These findings have contributed to current public health recommendations and policies for prevention of chronic diseases. Dr. Hu’s group has also identified novel bioma Continue reading >>

Johann Peter Frank - Wikipedia

Johann Peter Frank - Wikipedia

Gravure uit zijn boek "De curandis hominum morbis" (1832) Johann Peter Frank (19 March 1745 24 April 1821) was a German physician and hygienist who was a native of Rodalben . His first studies were in theology. He then studied medicine at the Universities of Strasbourg and Heidelberg , and earned his medical doctorate in 1766. He practiced medicine in Bruchsal and elsewhere for a time, and then became physician to the prince-bishop of Speyer . He was appointed professor of physiology and medical policy at the University of Gttingen in 1784, but the next year he went to Italy for his health and joined the faculty of the University of Pavia , where he succeeded Samuel-Auguste Tissot teaching clinical medicine (1785-1795). He was appointed sanitary inspector general of Lombardy , and introduced reforms in medical instruction and practice. The rank of councillor was conferred on him by the king of England , and later by the emperor of Austria, who employed him in 1795 for the regulation of the sanitary service of the army and as director general of the principal hospital of Vienna. In 1804, he went to Vilnius University as professor of clinical medicine, and then for a period of time (18051808), he was personal physician to Czar Alexander I , and also professor at the medical and surgical academy of St. Petersburg . In 1808, he returned to Vienna , where he was professor of medicine at the University of Vienna , as well as director of the Allegemeines Krankenhaus. Johann Frank was an important figure in the early history of social medicine and public health. For much of his career he worked on the System einer vollstndigen medicinischen Polizey (A Complete System of Medical Policy), which was a comprehensive 9-volume treatise on all aspects of hygiene and public health. Th Continue reading >>

Microalbuminuria - Wikipedia

Microalbuminuria - Wikipedia

Microalbuminuria is a term to describe a moderate increase in the level of urine albumin . It occurs when the kidney leaks small amounts of albumin into the urine, in other words, when there is an abnormally high permeability for albumin in the glomerulus of the kidney. Normally the kidneys filter albumin, so if albumin is found in the urine it's then a marker of kidney disease. The term 'microalbuminuria' is now discouraged by KDIGO (Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes) and has been replaced by 'moderately increased albuminuria'. marker of vascular endothelial dysfunction an important prognostic marker for kidney disease increasing microalbuminuria during the first 48 hours after admission to an intensive care unit predicts elevated risk for acute respiratory failure , multiple organ failure , and overall mortality a risk factor for venous thromboembolism [1] Microalbuminuria is an important adverse predictor of glycemic outcomes in pre-diabetes. Pre-diabetes individuals with increased microalbuminuria even in the so-called normal range is associated with increased progression to diabetes and decreased reversal to normoglycemia. Hence prediabetes individuals with microalbuminuria warrant more aggressive intervention to prevent diabetes in them. [2] Higher dietary intake of animal protein, animal fat, and cholesterol may increase risk for microalbuminuria, [3] and generally, diets higher in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains but lower in meat and sweets may be protective against kidney function decline. [4] [5] [6] The level of albumin protein produced by microalbuminuria can be detected by special albumin-specific urine dipsticks , which have a lower detection threshold than standard urine dipsticks. A microalbumin urine test determines the presence of the albu Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. IGT may precede type 2 diabetes mellitus by many years. IGT is also a risk factor for mortality.[1] Diagnosis[edit] According to the criteria of the World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association, impaired glucose tolerance is defined as:[2][3][4] two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/l) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. A patient is said to be under the condition of IGT when he/she has an intermediately raised glucose level after 2 hours, but less than the level that would qualify for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose may be either normal or mildly elevated. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose.[5] Treatment[edit] Main article: Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 The risk of progression to diabetes and development of cardiovascular disease is greater than for impaired fasting glucose.[6] Although some drugs can delay the onset of diabetes, lifestyle modifications play a greater role in the prevention of diabetes.[5][7] Patients identified as having an IGT may be able to prevent diabetes through a combination of increased exercise and reduction of body weight.[5] "Drug therapy can be considered when aggressive lifestyle interventions are unsuccessful."[5] See also[edit] Glucose tolerance test Impaired fasting glucose [edit] Further reading[edit] Melanie J Davies; I Peter Gray (3 February 1996). "Impaired glucose tolerance". British Medical Journal. 312 (7026): 264–65. doi:10.1136/bmj.312.7026.264. PMC 2349870 . PMID 8611769. – Editorial review Nathan, DM; Davidson Continue reading >>

Frank Gulotta - Wikipedia

Frank Gulotta - Wikipedia

Frank A. Gulotta (June 4, 1907 December 10, 1989) was a New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division judge, and a Nassau County district attorney. This section does not cite any sources . Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed . ( Learn how and when to remove this template message ) Gulotta was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1907 to Italian immigrant parents. He graduated from St. John's University Law School , and was admitted to the bar in 1932. He entered government service as Lynbrook village counsel and a zoning board member in the late 1930s. A Major in the U.S. Army during World War II , he won three battle stars for service in Africa and Italy. He was also an assistant district attorney from 1938-49, when Gov. Thomas E. Dewey appointed him district attorney for Nassau County . In 1956, in the biggest case of his career, Gulotta prosecuted Angelo LaMarca in the kidnap-murder of 33-day-old Peter Weinberger; LaMarca was executed. Gulotta held the district attorney office until 1958, when he was first elected to the state's Supreme Court . He joined the Appellate Division in 1971 and retired in 1977. He was a senior associate justice until 1983. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Wilford Brimley

Wilford Brimley

Anthony Wilford Brimley (born September 27, 1934),[1] credited either as A. Wilford Brimley or Wilford Brimley, is an American actor. He has appeared in many notable films including The China Syndrome (1979), The Thing (1982), The Natural (1984), Cocoon (1985) and The Firm (1993). He had a recurring role on the 1970s television series The Waltons. Brimley has type 2 adult-onset diabetes,[2] and has appeared in related commercials for Liberty Medical. He has also done television advertisements for the Quaker Oats Company.[3] Early life[edit] Brimley was born Anthony Wilford Brimley in Salt Lake City, Utah, on September 27, 1934,[3] where his father worked as a real estate broker.[4] Prior to his career in acting, Brimley dropped out of high school to serve in the United States Marine Corps, where he served in the Aleutian Islands for three years. He also worked as a bodyguard for Howard Hughes,[5] a ranch hand, a wrangler, and a blacksmith.[1] He then began shoeing horses for film and television. He began acting in the 1960s as a riding extra in Westerns and a stunt man at the urging of his friend, actor Robert Duvall.[6] Brimley married his first wife, the former Lynne Bagley, on July 6, 1956. They had four sons together (James Charles, John Michael, William Carmen and Lawrence Dean) and several grandchildren. Brimley and Lynne were married until her death in June 2000.[7] Brimley married Beverly Berry on October 31, 2007.[8] Together they have lived in Greybull, Wyoming and Santa Clara, Utah. In 2009, they founded nonprofit organization Hands Across the Saddle (HATS) in the Big Horn Basin.[9] Career[edit] Brimley's onscreen breakthrough came when he was cast in the popular 1970s television series The Waltons as Walton's Mountain resident Horace Brimley; he made seven a Continue reading >>

Gangrene

Gangrene

For other uses, see Gangrene (disambiguation). Gangrene is a type of tissue death caused by not enough blood supply.[4] Symptoms may include a change in skin color to red or black, numbness, swelling, pain, skin breakdown, and coolness.[1] The feet and hands are most commonly involved.[1] Certain types may present with a fever or sepsis.[1] Risk factors include diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, smoking, major trauma, alcoholism, HIV/AIDS, frostbite, and Raynaud's syndrome.[3][4] It can be classified as dry gangrene, wet gangrene, gas gangrene, internal gangrene, and necrotizing fasciitis.[3] The diagnosis of gangrene is based on symptoms and supported by tests such as medical imaging.[6] Treatment may involve surgery to remove the dead tissue, antibiotics to treat any infection, and efforts to address the underlying cause.[5] Surgical efforts may include debridement, amputation, or the use of maggot therapy.[5] Efforts to treat the underlying cause may include bypass surgery or angioplasty.[5] In certain cases hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be useful.[5] It is unknown how commonly the condition occurs.[2] Signs and symptoms[edit] An illustration showing four different stages of gangrene, including one (Fig. 4 top right) caused by an obstacle to the return of the venous blood due to heart disease. Symptoms may include a change in skin color to red or black, numbness, pain, skin breakdown, and coolness.[1] The feet and hands are most commonly involved.[1] Causes[edit] Gangrene is caused by a critically insufficient blood supply (e.g., peripheral vascular disease) or infection.[3][7][8] It is associated with diabetes[9] and long-term tobacco smoking.[4][3] Dry[edit] Dry gangrene is a form of coagulative necrosis that develops in ischemic tissue, where the blood supply Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

Frank's Sign - Wikipedia

Frank's Sign - Wikipedia

Earlobe creases seen in a Japanese angina patient Frank's sign is a diagonal crease in the ear lobe extending from the tragus across the lobule to the rear edge of the auricle . [1] The sign is named after Sanders T. Frank MD . [1] It has been hypothesised that Frank's sign is indicative of cardiovascular disease [2] and/or diabetes . [3] Some studies have described Frank's sign as a marker of cardiovascular disease but not linked to the severity of the condition. [4] In contrast, other studies have rebutted any association between Frank's sign and coronary artery disease in diabetics. [5] There have also been reported cases of Frank's sign assisting in the diagnosis of cerebral infarctions. [ citation needed ] A link between Frank's sign and premature aging and the loss of dermal and vascular fibers has also been hypothesized. [6] Some studies have focused upon bilateral ELC. [7] Grade 3 - A deep crease across the whole of the earlobe[ citation needed ] Grade 2a - Creased more than halfway across the earlobe[ citation needed ] Grade 2b - A superficial crease across the earlobe[ citation needed ] Grade 1 - A small amount of wrinkling on the earlobe[ citation needed ] Frank ST (August 1973). "Aural sign of coronary-artery disease". N. Engl. J. Med. 289 (6): 3278. doi : 10.1056/NEJM197308092890622 . PMID 4718047 . ^ Miot, H.A., Molina de Medeiros, M. etal (2006). Association between coronary artery disease and the diagonal earlobe an preauricular creases in men. Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia. vol.81 no.1 Mustafa Ahmed, M.D. (13 August 2014). "Earlobe Crease And Heart Disease Fact Or Myth?" . Abel Healthcare. Retrieved 8 February 2015. Lesbre JP, Castier B, Tribouilloy C, Labeille B, Isorni C (January 1987). "[Frank's sign and coronary disease]". Ann Cardiol Angeiol ( Continue reading >>

Retreat To Move Forward

Retreat To Move Forward

Liz using pieces of a lego train to emulate a 'robot penis' at a Six Sigma retreat "Retreat to Move Forward" is the ninth episode of the third season of the American television comedy series 30 Rock , and the 45th overall episode of the series. It was written by executive story editor Tami Sagher and directed by Steve Buscemi . The episode originally aired on the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) in the United States on January 22, 2009. Guest stars in this episode include Shalin Agarwal, Cheryl Lynn Bowers, Mark La Mura , Chris Parnell , Lola Pashalinski, and Elizabeth Rouse. In the episode, Jack Donaghy ( Alec Baldwin ) invites Liz Lemon ( Tina Fey ) to a corporate retreat, following his Bush administration and CEO debacles, for moral support. Meanwhile, Jenna Maroney ( Jane Krakowski ) employs method acting for her Janis Joplin role, which Frank Rossitano ( Judah Friedlander ) quickly takes advantage of. After Tracy Jordan ( Tracy Morgan ) is diagnosed with diabetes, Kenneth Parcell ( Jack McBrayer ) attempts to find a way to dissuade Tracy from eating sugary food. "Retreat to Move Forward" was generally well received among television critics. According to the Nielsen Media Research , the episode was watched by 6.4million households during its original broadcast, and received a 3.2 rating/8 share among viewers in the 1849 demographic. Jack Donaghy ( Alec Baldwin ) asks Liz Lemon ( Tina Fey ) to accompany him to the Six Sigmas Retreat in Croton-on-Hudson, New York , following his Bush administration and CEO debacles . There, Jack meets with the Six Sigmas, six men who each embody a core feature of Six Sigma: teamwork, insight, brutality, male enhancement, hand-shake-fulness and play-hard. [1] They disapprove of Liz's antics during the team building exercises and de Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy, also known as diabetic eye disease, is a medical condition in which damage occurs to the retina due to diabetes and is a leading cause of blindness.[1] It affects up to 80 percent of people who have had diabetes for 20 years or more.[2] At least 90% of new cases could be reduced if there were proper treatment and monitoring of the eyes.[3] The longer a person has diabetes, the higher his or her chances of developing diabetic retinopathy.[4] Each year in the United States, diabetic retinopathy accounts for 12% of all new cases of blindness. It is also the leading cause of blindness for people aged 20 to 64 years.[5] Signs and symptoms[edit] Normal vision The same view with diabetic retinopathy. Emptied retinal venules due to arterial branch occlusion in diabetic retinopathy (fluorescein angiography) Diabetic retinopathy often has no early warning signs. Even macular edema, which can cause rapid vision loss, may not have any warning signs for some time. In general, however, a person with macular edema is likely to have blurred vision, making it hard to do things like read or drive. In some cases, the vision will get better or worse during the day. In the first stage which is called non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) there are no symptoms, the signs are not visible to the eye and patients will have 20/20 vision. The only way to detect NPDR is by fundus photography, in which microaneurysms (microscopic blood-filled bulges in the artery walls) can be seen. If there is reduced vision, fluorescein angiography can be done to see the back of the eye. Narrowing or blocked retinal blood vessels can be seen clearly and this is called retinal ischemia (lack of blood flow). Macular edema in which blood vessels leak their contents into the macular regi Continue reading >>

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is a condition characterized by abnormally increased sweating,[3] in excess of that required for regulation of body temperature.[4] Although primarily a physical burden, hyperhidrosis can deteriorate quality of life from a psychological, emotional, and social perspective.[5] It has been called by some 'the silent handicap'.[6] Both the words diaphoresis and hidrosis can mean either perspiration (in which sense they are synonymous with sweating[7][8]) or excessive perspiration, in which case they refer to a specific, narrowly defined, clinical disorder. Classification[edit] Hyperhidrosis can either be generalized, or localized to specific parts of the body. Hands, feet, armpits, groin, and the facial area are among the most active regions of perspiration due to the high number of sweat glands (eccrine glands in particular) in these areas. When excessive sweating is localized (e.g. palms, soles, face, underarms, scalp) it is referred to as primary hyperhidrosis or focal hyperhidrosis. Excessive sweating involving the whole body is termed generalized hyperhidrosis or secondary hyperhidrosis. It is usually the result of some other, underlying condition. Primary or focal hyperhidrosis may be further divided by the area affected, for instance palmoplantar hyperhidrosis (symptomatic sweating of only the hands or feet) or gustatory hyperhidrosis (sweating of the face or chest a few moments after eating certain foods).[3] Hyperhidrosis can also be classified by onset, either congenital (present at birth) or acquired (beginning later in life). Primary or focal hyperhidrosis usually starts during adolescence or even earlier and seems to be inherited as an autosomal dominant genetic trait. It must be distinguished from secondary hyperhidrosis, which can start at any p Continue reading >>

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