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Forgot To Take Novolog

Anyone Take Novolog After Meal?

Anyone Take Novolog After Meal?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does anyone take their Novolog bolus after they eat? depending on what my blood sugar is I might wait until after my meal . But foro the most part I take it right before i eat . My daughter doing this since last 2 days after lunch and on 1st day her ppbs was 122,next day it was 160. My daughter doing this since last 2 days after lunch and on 1st day her ppbs was 122,next day it was 160. Why did she start doing this? I was wondering because when I take my Novolog before my meal my sugars are always low after the meal (one to two hours). I think it's reacting too quickly. Oradev, given relatively normal carbs in the meal, this suggests to me you are taking too much, not that it's too fast. I used to be on Novolog. I also had gastroparesis, which made my digestion go very slow. I always had to wait until after I ate to take Novolog, or I would go low as I was finishing my meal. If I ate Pizza or anything with fat or lots of cheese in it, I had to eat, wait 30 minutes, then bolus. Lots of meat will take longer to digest also. Not sure if your high fiber would affect the situation, but others might know. Coz of exams going on and timings are such that she hardly finishes her study,get on dining table for meal and then go to school after taking shot,this is temporary but I dont see any major change in her ppbs if she takes shot b4 or after meal. Problem is with our diet,we are 100% veggie and most of our foods are with carbs,can't help,no she has no issue of going low after or before meal in any case. I was wondering because when I take my Novolog before my meal my sugars are always low after the m Continue reading >>

Missing Insulin Injections

Missing Insulin Injections

Tweet Missed insulin injections are much more of a pain than the injections themselves and can cause a headache as to what effect a late injection will have and what dose should be administered. We look at this common problem and provide some guidance. Always remember that if you are at all unsure what to do, you should contact your health team for advice rather than risk making a mistake. In this article, when it says contact your health team, note that you may need to contact your out of hours service if your health team is not available. Common causes of missed injections Commonly cited reasons for missed injections include: Forgetting to take insulin Oversleeping Not having your injection kit with you Running out of insulin Having a fear of needles Deliberately missing insulin If you have problems with forgetting injections, see our forgetting injections guide dedicated to help prevent problems with forgetting to inject and if you forget whether you have injected or not. What to do if an insulin injection is missed There is not a set rule of what to do if an injection is missed as it can depend on how long ago the injection was meant to be administered and what type of insulin was to be taken. We provide some general tips but if you are in doubt, it is best to consult your health team and follow their advice. If long term/basal insulin was forgotten If you forget to take your long term insulin (basal insulin) and you realise relatively soon, it should usually be fine to inject your usual dose if the dose is given within 2 hours of when it should have been done. In this case, you’ll need to be aware that the injection was taken later and so the insulin will also be active in your body later than it would usually be. In some cases this could increase the chance of h Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Accidentally Injected 50 Units Of Novolog Insulin Instead Of Lantus

Asknadia: Accidentally Injected 50 Units Of Novolog Insulin Instead Of Lantus

Dear Nadia: I was going to watch a little TV before going to sleep I was wanting to wait up on my husband to get home from work. I grabbed my Lantus and took it in to the bedroom so I wouldn’t forget to take it before falling asleep. After getting all comfy in bed I thought I should just go ahead and take my Lantus. I take 50 units of Lantus at bed time and 8 units of Novalog with meals. My Blood sugar before going to bed was 136 so I get my Lantus pen dial up 50 units and inject it…… as soon as I withdrew the pin I knew something was wrong, I had just opened that Lantus pin the night before there shouldn’t be much used out of it but the pen was almost all empty. OMG what have I done? That’s my Novalog pen I told myself. I had just injected myself with 50 units of fast acting insulin. I’ve never did anything like that before I was freaking out. I knew this wasn’t good I knew I had to do something and do it quick. I ran to the computer and typed in “I took to much Novalog what do I do?” The first thing I read was call 911. I called my husband he didn’t answer I sent a text ” I need to get to the ER NOW” . I started getting dressed. While I was dressing my husband called I told him what had happened and to hurry I needed him to take me to the ER. I knew I needed to eat or drink something with a lot of sugar. I am a low carb eater and sugar wasn’t something I kept in the house and just then I remember seeing a can of real Coke in the refrigerator that my husband must had bought. I ran in and grabbed it popped it open and starting drinking. My husband arrived home a few minutes later we went to the ER where I spent the next 6 hours getting my finger stuck every 15-30 minutes and drinking sugary drinks and eating chocolate trying to keep my sugar fr Continue reading >>

Missed Insulin Injection | Diabetic Connect

Missed Insulin Injection | Diabetic Connect

I had to go out for a while today and forgot to carry my insulin with me. I got back home and was here for at least an hour before I remembered that I did not do my lunch time injection. I am torn about if I should go ahead and take it or just wait, check my BS before dinner and take my regular dose then. What would you do. Type 2 has a little more leeway in this kind of situation. Type 1 not so much. As a type 2 I would monitor my levels and see what is going on, maybe eat a little lower carb for dinner and get back on schedule. It also depends on if it's fast acting for that meal only or for a longer duration. I am on long lasting so I take mine every 12 hours, but sometimes it's not quite that accurate. Don't fret over it, I use to miss mine all the time and I finally winged myself off of it completely, just check your b/s level just in case and pick back up on it on your next schedule. Maybe my oops will help someone else down the line who would have the same question. I usually carry my pens with me every where I go, just left in a hurry this morning. Note to self don't forget your insulin.. LOL A BG of 136 an hour or two after eating is within range, so I would wait until your next meal to take another bolus (meal-time) insulin. Also, your low-carb meal certainly helped. You might wish to ask your doctor about a carb to insulin ratio so you can calculate your meal dose based on the number of carbs your are eating rather than just use a 9 unit dose all the time, (unless your meals all have the same carb value.) I would have taken it and noted the reason why.I keep one insulin pen in my purse and the rest at home. That way I have access to it Always Unlike the vials that need to be refrigeratedthe pens need none I am however undedr the loving care of and endocrinol Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Novolog is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Novolog is a fast-acting form of insulin. It is usually given with a long-acting insulin to provide a steady amount of insulin to control blood glucose (sugar) levels. This medication comes in an injectable form available in vials and prefilled pens. Novolog should be injected just under the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. It may also be injected directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare provider or by an insulin pump. Common side effects of Novolog include low blood sugar, reaction at the injection site, and weight gain. Novolog is a prescription medication used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects may occur. See "Novolog Precautions" section. Common side effects of Novolog include weight gain, reaction at the injection site, and low blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect seen with Novolog use. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating dizziness or lightheadedness shakiness hunger fast heart beat tingling of lips and tongue trouble concentrating or confusion blurred vision slurred speech anxiety, irritability or mood changes headache Severe low blood sugar can cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Know your symptoms of low blood sugar. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Talk to your healthcare provider if low blood sugar is a problem for you. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you tak Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir (insulin Detemir)?

What Is Levemir (insulin Detemir)?

Levemir is the brand name for the prescription drug insulin detemir. It's used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that lowers blood sugar by encouraging tissues to take excess glucose, discouraging the body from making more glucose, preventing the breakdown of fat and protein, and helping the body regulate levels of blood sugar. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Levemir in 2006. Novo Nordisk manufactures the drug. Levemir FlexTouch Levemir FlexTouch is an insulin pen syringe prefilled with Levemir. It's designed to make the drug easier to use. You should keep unopened Levemir FlexTouch in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use it. After opening, store it at room temperature no warmer than 86 degrees Fahrenheit. You should dispose of FlexTouch 42 days after opening, regardless of whether or not there is any left in the device. Levemir versus Lantus Levemir is similar to another man-made form of insulin, insuline glargine, which is sold under the brand name Lantus. Both drugs have similar side effects and have been to be effective at managing blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about which drug is better for you. Levemir Warnings You should not take Levemir if: You’re allergic to Levemir or any other ingredient in the drug Your blood sugar is low Talk to your doctor before taking Levemir if: You’re sick, stressed, or have an infection You have kidney or liver problems The potassium level in your blood is low Your doctor may lower your dose of Levemir if you are taking certain drugs, such as exenatide (Bydureon), liraglutide (Victoza), or albiglutide (Tanzeum). Levemir Storage You can store unopened vials of Levemir at room temperature or in the refrigerator, but toss a Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening Tresiba® (insulin degludec injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus. Tresiba® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis or for pediatric patients requiring less than 5 units of Tresiba®. Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening. Increase monitoring with changes to: insulin dose, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness or renal or hepatic impairment Accidental mix-ups betwe Continue reading >>

Fiasp Dosing Options | Fiasp (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Fiasp Dosing Options | Fiasp (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Fiaspis contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to Fiaspor one of its excipients. Never share a FiaspFlexTouchPen between patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using Fiaspvials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Fiasp (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL Indications and Usage Fiasp(insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is a rapid-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Fiaspis contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to Fiaspor one of its excipients. Never share a FiaspFlexTouchPen between patients, even if the needle is changed.Patients using Fiaspvials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Fiasp, and may be life-threatening. Increase glucose monitoring with changes to: insulin dosage, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with renal impairment or hepatic impairme Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Revisiting The Missed Insulin Shot Question

Ask D'mine: Revisiting The Missed Insulin Shot Question

Need help navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! That would be our weekly advice column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical diabetes educator Wil Dubois This week, Wil takes another look at a common question often posed by those of us in the Diabetes Community: What do I do if I miss an insulin dose? Happens to us all, at times, and it's always good to refresh our knowledge. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Pete, type 2 from Florida, writes:I have been struggling with diabetes for 5 years. I will sometimes fail to do my shot before dinner and wonder if I should take the 40 units when I remember? Or wait and take it before bedtime? I am looking for guidance. I am tying to find a path that works. [email protected] D’Mine answers: One of the universal things we insulin users suffer from — no matter what type of diabetes we have or what type of insulin we take — is the missed shot. Yep, when it comes to life on insulin, the old rodeo adage of it’s not a matter of if you get hurt; it’s only a matter of when you’ll get hurt can be translated directly into diabetes: It’s not a matter of if you will miss a shot; it’s only a matter of when you will miss a shot. We talked about this briefly a while back, but it’s such a universal problem that’s so much more complicated than it looks on the surface, that I think it’s worth revisiting today. So here’s Professor Wil’s quick course on the inevitable missed shot dilemma: Types of Insulin There are two main kinds of insulin: The fast ones and the slow ones. We’ll start slow. Actually, no. I changed my mind. We’ll start fast, because the answer for a missed fast-acting insulin shot is, well, faster. The fast insulins are Apidra, Humalog, and Novolog. One member o Continue reading >>

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:27 -- Richard Morris See also Kinetics vs. Dynamics , Humalog & Heat and Users' Reports Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours. Many people who've tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the "action time" for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don't have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night. For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point. With Humalog or Novolog, you're better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulins to cover meals. The clearly defined ac Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Missing In Action

Ask D'mine: Missing In Action

Need help navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! That would be our weekly advice column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. This week he's offering some wisdom on what we people with diabetes (PWD) can do if and when we miss a dose of insulin... Yes, it happens. So, read on! {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Edwin, type 2 from Maryland, writes: I have been diabetic for approximately 12 years. I take Humalog shots before meals, and one shot of 28 units of Lantus at bedtime. My question is, what do I do if I miss a bedtime Lantus shot, and I realize this the next day? This is exactly what happened this morning. The previous night, I had stayed home watching movies and I had a few vodka martinis. I got sleepy, and just went to sleep. When I woke up, I realized I forgot my shot! [email protected] D'Mine answers: Gotta watch out for those vodka martinis! But these kind of things can happen to all of us, with or without the martinis, so don't feel badly. Actually, I'm amazed you remembered in the morning. Maybe your blood sugar reminded you? ;-) As to what to do about the missed shot, this is a trickier question than you might think. I'll give you my thoughts, but this probably falls into the "ask your doctor" category, which means that I need to remind everyone that my title of Doctor WilD is a purely honorary one, granted to me by an un-accredited mail-order "university" in the northeastern part of Liechtenstein. And on top of that, my honorary doctorate isn't a medical degree, but a PhD, and it isn't even in diabetes, it's in underwater basket weaving. So, the medical disclaimer dispensed with, let us proceed... Some missed meds should be taken as soon as you realize you missed them. With others, you need to Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Medication And Insulin

Questions And Answers - Medication And Insulin

Q: I have type 2 diabetes and have been on insulin for a year now. I have lost some weight and my A1C has dropped from 9.5 to 6.5 but I am having a lot of lows ranging from upper 40's to 60's. I am wondering if maybe I might be able to get off insulin. I feel that my oral med is starting to work better now that my beta cells have had a rest. Can that be true? A: Yes, your cells are also in a better position to uptake glucose from the bloodstream now that you have decreased body fat. You should see your physician ASAP to get this adjusted. 40's are a dangerous range to be in. He/she may start weaning you off insulin, watching your levels along the way. Q: How much is blood sugar decreased for every unit of novolog insulin? A: A starting point is to consider that one unit of insulin will lower the glucose 50 points. This can vary from 30-100 points, depending on one's insulin sensitivity, exercise habits, food choices or other variables. Time will tell for you as you test and track your numbers to see if a pattern evolves. Q: What medication is used to replace metformin when liver enzymes are high and the endocrinologist discontinues this medication? A: Much will depend on the advancement of your diabetes and other medications you might be taking. Your physician might choose a meglitinide such as Prandin or an alpha-clucosidase inhibitor such as Precose. Insulin would be another choice. There are other meds and newer ones always in the mill. Some physicians keep their patients on Metformin if the enzyme levels are not too high. If your numbers are not too high and you are otherwise healthy, focus on lifestyle management. Losing body fat, if needed, can help to get things under control. Q: My bottle of insulin will expire next month. Can I still use it or do I need to thro Continue reading >>

Novocare | Savings Card For Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 Units/ml

Novocare | Savings Card For Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 Units/ml

Some error has occurred. Please try again. User already exists. We're sorry, your account is currently unavailable. We're currently working to fix the issue. Please check back soon. {{registerModel.webserviceError}} Do not share your NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog FlexTouch, PenFill cartridge or PenFill cartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What is NovoLog(insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL? NovoLogis a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Do not share your NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog FlexTouch, PenFill cartridge or PenFill cartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking Continue reading >>

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