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Forgot To Give Child Lantus

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (lant-us) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Lantus after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen/cartridge/vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Lantus in children less than 6 years. Before you start to use Lantus Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foo Continue reading >>

Quiz: Questions About Diabetes Care

Quiz: Questions About Diabetes Care

Take the quiz below to test your knowledge about diabetes care. When you submit the quiz, the answers to the questions will display on-screen. What is the target blood sugar range you should aim for? What is a low blood sugar and how do you treat a low blood sugar? Which insulin is long-acting and when do you give it? It's your first day of school and you are out at recess and start feeling funny – a little shaky and dizzy. What should you do? You are about to start gym class. You will be running and active for the next hour. What should you do? You were exhausted after a busy day and completely forgot to give the bedtime Lantus. It's midnight and dad just woke up and realized this. What should he do? It's 2:00am and the blood sugar is 480mg/dl. What should you do? It's breakfast time. Your blood sugar is low at 60, but you feel fine and breakfast is ready. You are planning on eating 45 grams of carbohydrates. What should you do? Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Forgot My Insulin... And I'm On Vacation!

Ask D'mine: Forgot My Insulin... And I'm On Vacation!

Need help navigating life with diabetes? You can always Ask D'Mine! Welcome again to our weekly Q&A column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil has some advice on what to do if you're heading off on vacation... but happen to forget your insulin. A very timely topic in these hot summer months. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Anonymous, type unknown, writes from the road: I’m on vacation and forgot my Lantus. How long can I go without it? [email protected] D’Mine answers: Not long. If you’re type 1, you’re going to start getting very sick within a day and will likely go into DKA before your vacation is over. If you’re type 2, you’ll survive, but you’ll have a miserable vacation. You’ll be peeing all the time, your vision will get blurry, and you’ll get so grumpy that your traveling companions will likely leave you on the road somewhere and go on without you. The solution, of course, is to find some insulin before you do anything else. There are actually a number of options, depending on your exact circumstances and where you are; and it goes without saying that you have to avoid all carbs while you seek out your replacement insulin. Now, if you normally pick up your Lantus at a national chain pharmacy, a local outlet will have your prescription on their computer. In a perfect world you’d be able to breeze in and refill your prescription. Of course, if you haven’t noticed, it’s not a perfect world. When you go in you’ll likely be told that it’s “too early” to refill your prescription, and that your insurance won’t cover the medication that you need to survive your trip. Yes indeedy. This is truly the greatest nation on Earth. If this happens to you, first try calling the c Continue reading >>

Splitting Insulin Glargine Doses

Splitting Insulin Glargine Doses

I’ve been asked (again) about optimizing how to give the dose of Lantus (insulin glargine), so I decided I’ll share my thoughts on-line. First, a disclaimer: (1) I previously worked for Aventis and later Sanofi-Aventis, the manufacturer of Lantus, in the area of pharmacovigilance (drug safety). (2) The advice given here is “off-label” (that is, it’s not approved by the FDA). Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine, a very long-lasting insulin product that was approved by the FDA in 2000; it was first sold in the US in 2001 and is now available world-wide. It was originally marketed as “peakless”, but the marketing folks soon changed the wording to “no pronounced peak.” The whole idea was that Lantus lasts longer than a day, so if you inject it once daily, the previous day’s dose is still lingering, and smoothing out the action of the insulin. (BTW, logically, if only one dose of the insulin were to be given, and no other insulin doses, every insulin, including Lantus, would have a beginning, a peak, and then a decay to no-activity sooner or later.) However, many patients and their physicians noted that even with its long duration of action, Lantus does have peak activity at one time of day, and the effect drifts down towards the time the next dose is due. The company countered by saying that the dose could be given at different times of day: “Once a day, at the same time each day. Most people take Lantus at bedtime, but you can take it at other times if your healthcare professional says it’s okay.” But the company adamantly refused to do studies that would show the effectiveness of twice-daily dosing; I suspect the rationale for refusing was that it would spoil their marketing message that it was a once-daily insulin. Anyhow, it soon beca Continue reading >>

Missing Insulin Injections

Missing Insulin Injections

Tweet Missed insulin injections are much more of a pain than the injections themselves and can cause a headache as to what effect a late injection will have and what dose should be administered. We look at this common problem and provide some guidance. Always remember that if you are at all unsure what to do, you should contact your health team for advice rather than risk making a mistake. In this article, when it says contact your health team, note that you may need to contact your out of hours service if your health team is not available. Common causes of missed injections Commonly cited reasons for missed injections include: Forgetting to take insulin Oversleeping Not having your injection kit with you Running out of insulin Having a fear of needles Deliberately missing insulin If you have problems with forgetting injections, see our forgetting injections guide dedicated to help prevent problems with forgetting to inject and if you forget whether you have injected or not. What to do if an insulin injection is missed There is not a set rule of what to do if an injection is missed as it can depend on how long ago the injection was meant to be administered and what type of insulin was to be taken. We provide some general tips but if you are in doubt, it is best to consult your health team and follow their advice. If long term/basal insulin was forgotten If you forget to take your long term insulin (basal insulin) and you realise relatively soon, it should usually be fine to inject your usual dose if the dose is given within 2 hours of when it should have been done. In this case, you’ll need to be aware that the injection was taken later and so the insulin will also be active in your body later than it would usually be. In some cases this could increase the chance of h Continue reading >>

Toujeo Solostar

Toujeo Solostar

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Names: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is Toujeo? Toujeo (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. The Toujeo SoloStar injection pen is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Toujeo is used to treat type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes in adults. It is not known if Toujeo is safe and effective in children. Important information Toujeo SoloStar contains 3 times as much insulin per milliliter (mL) as regular insulin. You should not use Toujeo if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Never share a Toujeo SoloStar injection pen with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Sharing injection pens can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. Toujeo is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Toujeo if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). To make sure Toujeo is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatmen Continue reading >>

Basaglar Kwikpen Side Effects

Basaglar Kwikpen Side Effects

What Is Basaglar Kwikpen? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Insulin glargine is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of this medicine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Insulin glargine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure insulin glargine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be dif Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Byetta

What You Should Know About Byetta

BYETTA + insulin glargine (Lantus®): Important Considerations BYETTA and insulin glargine work in different ways to help you control your blood sugar. When you have type 2 diabetes, your blood sugar is especially high right after a meal—but it may also remain too high throughout the day. BYETTA helps lower your blood sugar, especially after meals. Insulin glargine provides a slow, steady release of insulin and helps manage your blood sugar between meals and overnight. If your doctor has prescribed BYETTA along with insulin glargine, please keep the following in mind: BYETTA is not insulin and should not be taken instead of insulin. Take BYETTA twice a day, within 60 minutes of your 2 main meals approximately 6 hours or more apart. Take your once-daily insulin as prescribed by your doctor. Do not mix BYETTA and insulin in the same syringe or vial even if you take them at the same time. Consult with your doctor before you stop taking any medications. Your doctor will most likely add BYETTA to your treatment plan for type 2 diabetes while keeping you on any oral medications you are currently taking for diabetes, in addition to insulin glargine. Keeping track of your progress Periodic blood sugar monitoring is part of your diabetes plan while on BYETTA. Self-monitoring of blood sugar is important and will help you and your doctor determine how well your type 2 diabetes is controlled. Talk to your doctor for specific instructions on blood sugar testing. Based on your response to BYETTA, your doctor may increase the dose after a month. Typically, your doctor will use a test called an A1C to determine how well your treatment is working. The A1C is a lab test that shows your average blood sugar level over the past 2-3 months. Because the A1C measures blood sugar over time, i Continue reading >>

Forgot To Take Lantus..what Should I Do?

Forgot To Take Lantus..what Should I Do?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was at a party the other night, and I honestly forgot to take my Lantus. I wasent quite sure what to do the next morning, so I just decided to check my sugars at random parts of the day, and just use my correction dosage. But I also realized that I am still in the honeymoon period, so its not like I had NO insulin in me whatso ever. If you guys have any suggestions or better steps to take for me to take if I ever forget to take it again, pleaseeeee tell me. Thanks If it were me, I would just monitor and cover all day until my normal shot time. I'd probably also be taking it twice a day, as from what I read it seems to work better that way, and would also cut down on the severity of a missed shot. It has been awhile since I used lantus, but I probably would have gone with a split dose and then checked all day long and corrected. I've done this before when I was taking my Lantus before bed. Woke up about 3AM and remembered that I had not taken my shot before bed. Checked my bg to be sure and sure enough, middle 300's !!! Called one of our local ER's and to tell you the truth, they were NOT much help. When I explained my situation, their response was "Well, we don't think it would hurt you to take it now but we really aren't advising you one way or the other." I was like WTF?? Aren't they supposed to be there to help you?? I finally was able to get in touch with my CDE through the hospital and he told me to go ahead and take it but to monitor the next 24 hrs very closely. My suggestion would be to discuss this with your endo. It's best to know what to do before a situation arises. i'm pretty s Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Forgot To Take My Basal! Despre Diabet

Forgot To Take My Basal! Despre Diabet

What should I do if I forget my bedtime dose of Lantus, and dont realize it until the next morning? I take Humalog with each meal and Lantus at bedtime. I was so embarrassed to call my doctor and admit I forgot my shotso I just took the full dose in the morning, but then I got low during the day! First of all, although Im not advocating forgetting shots, I do want to say it seems that forgetting a shot is a rite of passage with diabetes i.e. the diabetes is no longer so prominent in your mind that it is monopolizing your every thought-which is a good thing. When patients would call me apologizing for this, I would encourage them to not be too hard on themselves, but rather to just learn from the error, and develop a habit that will prevent them from forgetting shots in the future. That said, I must first emphasize that the answer to your question must be provided by your healthcare team. Giving specific insulin dosage advice is beyond the scope of this website service. I will explain the principles involved in making the decision on the dose, but it is important that you discuss this with your healthcare professional (HCP). Knowing the principles of insulin action will help you understand what to do. You run the risk of getting hypoglycemia if you take the full insulin dose several hours too late, since this new dose will overlap with the other insulin doses circulating in your system. Unfortunately, although HCPs involved with diabetes usually understand insulin adjustment principles, it is difficult to find this advice in published form. Learning how to adjust insulin requires not only an understanding of diabetes but also a lot of practice and experience-and most importantly, knowing the individual persons specific response to insulin. That is why it is crucial that Continue reading >>

Basaglar (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Basaglar (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans and essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Insulin glargine is a once-daily basal insulin analog without pronounced peaks. BASAGLAR, Lantus, Lantus SoloStar, Toujeo SoloStar BASAGLAR/Lantus/Lantus SoloStar/Toujeo SoloStar Subcutaneous Inj Sol: 1mL, 100U, 300U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous dosage (100 units/mL, i.e., Lantus, Basaglar) Initially, administer one-third of the total daily insulin requirements/dose subcutaneously once daily. Titrate dosage to achieve blood glucose control and A1C goals in conjunction with a short-acting insulin. Give the dose at the same time every day, at any time. Administration in the morning may avoid nocturnal hypoglycemia. When transferring from once daily NPH insulin, the dose is usually not changed. However, when transferring from twice-daily NPH insulin to insulin glargine, the total daily dose of NPH insulin (or other twice daily basal insulin) should be reduced by 20% and administered as single dose once daily. When transferring from once-daily Toujeo to once-daily Lantus or Basaglar, the recommended initial Lantus or Basaglar dose is 80% of the Toujeo dose that is being discontinued. Thereafter, the dosage of insulin glargine should be adjusted to response. Children and Adolescents 6 years and older Insulin requirements are highly variable and must be individualized based on patient-specific factors and type of insulin regimen. During partial remission phase, total combined daily insulin requirement is often less than 0.5 units/kg/day. Prepubertal children (outside the partial remission phase) usually require 0.7 to Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Introduction If your child doesn't want to feel the insulin needle, your child's doctor can prescribe an indwelling subcutaneous cannula. A small needle is used to insert a soft tube into a place where you give your child an insulin shot, such as the belly. The needle is taken out, but the soft tube (cannula) stays in your child's body and is held in place with tape. Then, when your child needs insulin, the insulin needle is put into the cannula instead of into the skin. This way, your child won't have to feel the insulin needle. The cannula can be used for at least 3 days before your child will need a new one. The three most important elements of success in giving insulin injections include: Making sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practicing how to give an injection. Storing insulin properly so that each dose will work effectively. How is insulin prepared and given? Your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you and your child learn to prepare and give insulin injections. If your child is age 10 or older, he or she may be able to give insulin with supervision. Here are some simple steps to help you and your child learn this task. To get ready to give an insulin injection using an insulin vial and insulin syringe or an insulin pen, follow these steps. Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them thoroughly. If your child is going to help, wash his or her hands well. Gather the supplies. Keep the supplies in a bag or kit so your child can carry the supplies wherever he or she goes. Check the insulin bottle or cartridge. When an insulin vial is used for the first time, write the date on the bottle. Insulin stored at room temperature will last for about a month. Read and Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin Question- Page 3

Lantus Insulin Question- Page 3

BTW I wrote a paper on automony. I've been to your referenced website before. It's awesome. interesting thread. i hope that we are being the educators that our patients require when they are sent home as for the nurse that routinely gives 2 units when has been ordered she is playing with fire and with her license...how does the nurse working the next day know what has been given..if she gives the prescribed dose of regular dose and the patient bottoms out Diabetics on an insulin pump can go into DKA approx 4 hours after the insulin is stopped. So say, they go in the shower and disconnect the pump and forget to put it back on, 4 hours after disconnecting and they could be in DKA, even if their BSL was 20mgdl before the shower. Insulin pumps require a different mindset to be adapted. If a client had a pump, and a BSL of 20, stopping the insulin being administered from the pump will not help raise their sugars in the short-term, but in the longer-term (when the insulin would have peaked 30min-2 hours later). of course you treat the hypoglycemia first. you are correct that you have to look at the factors that contributed to the episode. the doctor may want to modify the dose if there is a trend. but again i say you never withold basal insulin for a type 1. basal insulin is required to control hepatic glucose output even when fasting. this point is so true, and it underscores the importance of knowing whether your pt has type 1 or type 2 dm. in our hospital a few years ago, there was the case where a woman with type 1 dm had her surgery delayed 2 days by a doctor's order: npo after midnight hold all insulin. the nurse followed the doctor's order. pt's bg in a.m, was >500 so anesthesiologist cancelled surgery. same procedure was repeted that night with same results in the a. Continue reading >>

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