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Footballers With Type 1 Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

Athletes With Diabetes: How Jay Cutler Tackles Type 1

Athletes With Diabetes: How Jay Cutler Tackles Type 1

Pro-bowler and NFL quarterbackJay Cutler is a shining example of how to successfully manage diabetes andachieve greatness Think diabetes can stop you from becoming a pro-football player? Think again. Jay Cutler is one of many professional athletes who is proving that even though diabetes is a game-changer, its not the end-game. Cutler had an exceptional track record before receivinghis T1D diagnosis. He led his Vanderbilt University team past the University of Tennessee for a 2824 win in their 2005 season, the first since 1982, in addition to being one of the Commodores greatest offensive players of all time. As the third-best quarterback in the 2006 NFL draft, Cutler was picked up by the Denver Broncos he was at the top of his game. But in 2007, while with the Broncos, he experienced significant, unexplained weight loss and reported feelings of fatigue in the 2007 season. In April of 2008, at age 25, Jay Cutler received a type one diabetes diagnosis. I was aware I was having an issue one time last year against Kansas City. It was early in the game, first or second series, and I just didnt feel rightI felt out of it a little, shaky. What does a NFL quarterback do when given a T1D diagnosis? I went the whole summer just kind of dealing with it and figuring it out, test driving insulins to see what worked, what didnt work, what my numbers were, Cutler told ESPN . Jay had to adjust quickly to blood sugar testing. How does a newly diagnosed T1D maintain diabetes while playing a NFL game? I try to enter the game in the 80s knowing that when the game starts and adrenaline kicks in that I will jump up 20 to 30 points. Throughout the gameI monitor & check my sugars periodically to make sure Im still in a healthy range. Despite this major life change, Cutler was named player of Continue reading >>

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re an athlete who has Type-1 diabetes, you know how important it is to keep your blood sugar under excellent control. Blood sugar levels have a direct impact on strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and healing capabilities – all essential components of success in sport and fitness activities. There have been many athletes with diabetes who have excelled in their chosen sport (see athletes with diabetes list at bottom of page). But it isn’t without its challenges. Different forms of exercise can have very different effects on blood sugar, particularly when adrenal hormones start to kick in. Recovery from an exercise session may take blood sugar levels to strange and exotic places. What’s more, around-the-clock control is necessary for maintaining appropriate hydration and energy stores for athletic performance. Integrated Diabetes Services is led by one of the few certified diabetes educators who also happens to be a masters-level exercise physiologist. While not exactly a “world-class” athlete, Gary Scheiner participates and competes in a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. He served on the Board of Directors for the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association for many years (now Insulindependence), and advises athletes and exercise enthusiasts with diabetes worldwide. In 2006 he received the Julie Betshart Award for the study of exercise and diabetes by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. He continues to speak nationally and internationally for both patients and healthcare professionals on exercise, diabetes and blood sugar control. Through his personal and professional experiences, Gary has helped athletes at all levels to incorporate new techniques for controlling blood sugar and enhancing athletic performance. He and his team of Continue reading >>

Championship Footballer And Father To A Child With Type 1 Diabetes Richard Wood Speaks To Jdrf

Championship Footballer And Father To A Child With Type 1 Diabetes Richard Wood Speaks To Jdrf

Championship footballer and father to a child with type 1 diabetes Richard Wood speaks to JDRF Championship footballer and father to a child with type 1 diabetes Richard Wood speaks to JDRF When I see what my son goes through every day people should know about it. Rotherham United football star Richard Wood has spoken to JDRF about why the charity is so close to his heart and of his hope to raise awareness of type 1 diabetes . The defender has a personal connection to type 1 diabetes his eight year old son Jenson lives with the condition. Richard is hoping to raise more awareness as an ambassador for JDRF. He and his teammates at the south Yorkshire club have previously posed in blue JDRF t-shirts before a match with Wolverhampton Wanderers last season. JDRF spoke to Richard about how he helps Jenson manage his type 1 and the balancing act of doing this and traveling across the country as a professional footballer. I go to every match concerned about Jensons type 1. In fact, every day I go into training I think and worry about how he will be. I dont think that will ever change but, luckily, he has a great mum who I have complete trust in and looks after Jenson really well. When asked about the days immediately after Jenson was diagnosed with type 1, Richard said: We had no knowledge of type 1 but learned very quickly what type 1 is and that its not the be all and end all. We got to grips with it straight away. As a footballer with my lifestyle I have an understanding of energy, glucose and carbohydrates so am quite switched on with things like that. I read up on it straight away and what I needed to do to improve my sons life with type 1. I knew in those first few weeks I needed to learn as much as I could and thats what we all did. In August Richard was joined at Roth Continue reading >>

The Real Madrid Player With Type 1 Diabetes

The Real Madrid Player With Type 1 Diabetes

The Real Madrid Player with Type 1 Diabetes Nacho Fernndez, diagnosed at age 11, opens up about his Type 1 diagnosis, and how he feels it has shaped his career as a pro athlete. Real Madrid defender Nacho Fernndez was told at the age of 12 that he would have to give up his aspirations of having a soccer career because of his Type 1 diabetes. Nacho (aka Jos Ignacio Fernndez Iglesias), joined Real Madrids youth system at the age of 11 with a clear goal in mind to one day play for one of the most historic and successful sports franchises in the world. But according to a UEFA.com profile, just a year later he had to miss a Real Madrid tournament for a hospital trip. There he met a doctor who said he couldnt play soccer anymore. Luckily, an endocrinologist told him the opposite a few days later, and now he plays at the highest level for one of the most elite soccer clubs in the world. Since his first call-up to the professional level in 2011, Nacho has appeared in 118 games and scored five goals, with three of them coming in the 2016-17 season. Nacho has been very open about his condition and the challenges he faces on a day-to-day basis. In the same UEFA.com profile, Nacho said he has had to take care of himself three times more than a normal person. But he believes managing his diabetes care has in some ways made him more responsible than the average athlete. In a sport such as soccer that requires intense conditioning and cardiovascular endurance, consistently monitoring glucose levels is paramount to staying on the field and preventing serious injury. Even the adrenaline rush of playing in front of thousands of screaming fans can greatly impact blood sugar levels. Nacho seems to not get enough of the challenge. He even participates in other endurance sporting events, li Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Type 1 Diabetes

Celebrities With Type 1 Diabetes

1 / 14 Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the body doesn't produce insulin, the hormone that converts glucose into energy. The condition affects about 3 million people in the United States alone, and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day. So, every time you take the steps needed to monitor your condition, remember that you’re in some pretty famous company. Continue reading >>

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

As a young diabetic, one of the most challenging adjustments to make after my diagnosis was figuring out how to continue participating in the sports that I had already been playing. Fortunately, by working with my parents and doctors, I was able to continue competing in the sports I loved. With advancements in diabetes management, this is now easier than ever. At one time, a type 1 diabetic person excelling in sports would have been unthinkable. Now, however, diabetes is a small side note in the story of many excellent athletes. With the advent and integration of health informatics into diabetes care, it is easier than ever for diabetic athletes to communicate with their healthcare team and figure out routines that work for them. Through the electronic collection, storage, and continuous analysis of blood sugar data, doctors and patients are now able to make more accurate, informed, and constant adjustments to management routines. This ability is a game changer for diabetic athletes, for whom precise blood sugar control is key. Moving forward, this will only continue to improve as healthcare technology continues to embrace the incredible rise of mobile technology, and patients have even greater abilities to communicate with their doctors. These improvements do not mean that being a world-class athlete as a diabetic is simple, or easy, however. By looking at some of the greatest type 1 diabetic athletes in history, all of us can learn a great deal from both their successes and hardships. It is also important for the diabetic community to celebrate the achievements of these athletes. Jay Cutler: American Football Jay Cutler has been the most notable recent diabetic athlete. This is because Cutler was already in the NFL at the time of his diagnosis, and is already one of t Continue reading >>

Professional Footballer With Type 1 Diabetes Swaps Shin Pads For A Onesie

Professional Footballer With Type 1 Diabetes Swaps Shin Pads For A Onesie

Professional footballer with type 1 diabetes swaps shin pads for a onesie Professional footballer with type 1 diabetes swaps shin pads for a onesie Southend United footballer Ben Coker has thrown his backing behind JDRF and the #TypeOnesie campaigndonninga onesie to support type 1 diabetes research. The left-back, who lives with type 1 diabetes, is one of the most high-profile figures in the football world living with the condition and has previously spoken of why raising awareness of type 1 is so important as well as of his shock when he was diagnosed aged 15. In an interview in the Daily Mail in September this year, Ben, who is originally from Hertfordshire but has plied his trade with Southend since 2013, spoke of his previous fears that the condition might affect his career. Speaking to the Mail he said: My first question was: Will I still be able to play football? At the time, I was playing a lot of football; 12 hours of training a week and a match on Saturdays and trying for a soccer apprenticeship. I couldnt take the risk of a hypo. Ben, 26, has shown that his condition has not held him back, as he has gone on to make just short of 100 appearances for Southend. A hero to footie-mad children living with the condition across the country, Ben was diagnosed at the age of 15 and has never looked back. Upon posing in an animal onesie (the exact creature he dressed as is a source of much debate) Ben tweeted: Dont I look one-derful as a #TypeOnesie?! [Im] proud to be supporting JDRF and type 1 diabetes research! The #TypeOnesie campaign has received support from schools, offices and individuals from across the country, and Ben joins other high-profile JDRF supporters including TV personality and Hairy Biker, Si King and rugby professional Chris Pennell in donning a ones Continue reading >>

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

A few weeks ago, Kyle Love was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This week he lost his job over the diagnosis. That’s the black and white truth. You could explain away the situation because Kyle Love happened to have been a defensive tackle for the New England Patriots. After the diagnosis he dropped 30 pounds off his 310 pound frame, thereby causing the team to cut him with a “non-football illness designation.” In plain English, Kyle Love was fired because he has diabetes. But he’s not alone, there are dozens of athletes with diabetes, many of them legendary. This week I am off on another journey with Team Diabetes. Over the past 5 years, I have raised more than $25 000 to help people living with diabetes, and pre-diabetes. The money I raise goes to research, support programs, and awareness. Awareness is the central point of what Team Diabetes is about. As we do our fundraising, we are telling everyone about diabetes, the importance of being active, and having a healthy diet. It’s too bad I couldn’t sit down with the New England Patriots and explain to them that athletes with diabetes is not a ‘firing offence.’ Bill Belichick, and the rest of the Patriots front office, the message you are sending to kids with diabetes is terrible. Instead of keeping an athlete who could act as a role model to tens of thousands of kids, you are cutting him loose – deeming him broken and worthless. Athletes with diabetes are not broken. It’s treatable, and manageable. In fact, Kyle Love has been managing his Type 2 diagnosis and is ready to ball this fall. Shame on you, Pats. Just check out this list of athletes with diabetes who went on to huge success. **UPDATE** The moment Love was put on waivers, the Jacksonsville Jaguars picked him up. Looks like I’ve got a new f Continue reading >>

Care Of The Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

Care Of The Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

Care of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 3Department of Medicine, G.V. Montgomery VA Medical Center, Mississippi, Jackson, United States 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 3Department of Medicine, G.V. Montgomery VA Medical Center, Mississippi, Jackson, United States *Corresponding author: William B. Horton, Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 N State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 39216, United States. Tel: +1-6019845601, Fax: +1-6019846665, E-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Jan 6; Revised 2016 Feb 24; Accepted 2016 Mar 1. Copyright 2016, Research Institute For Endocrine Sciences and Iran Endocrine Society This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( ) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from a highly specific immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic cells, resulting in chronic hyperglycemia. For many years, one of the mainstays of therapy for patients with T1DM has been exercise balanced with appropriate medications and medical nutrition. Compared to healthy peers, athletes with T1DM experience nearly all the same health-related benefits from exercise. Despite these benefits, effective manag Continue reading >>

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The athletes who have triumphed over type 1 diabetes Aidan Broddell first displayed symptoms of diabetes when he was 10 Talk of sport and Type 1 diabetes may evoke memories of Gary Mabbutt, the former Tottenham Hotspurdefender who represented his country at the highest level and lifted the UEFA Cup and FA Cup, twice, whilst often having to inject himself with insulin at half-time. But while the physical demands of diabetes are known to many sports fans, the battles that sufferers experience off the pitch, dealing with the psychological repercussions of their condition,are in need of greater recognition. Of the estimated fourmillion people with diabetes in the UK, 10 per centhave Type 1. This means they cannot produce insulin, instead having to self-administer the energy source either though injections or a pump. Its an essential, dailyroutine that can have debilitating emotional side-effects. Research by Diabetes.org.uk shows that people with Type 1 are twice as likely to suffer from depression and more prone to anxiety and eating disorders. But very few diabetics get access to the psychological support they need. Since men in particular struggle to ask for help, young athletes such as Exeter Chiefs' England rugby international Henry Slade , 22, and Southend United footballer Ben Coker , 25, are now encouraging diabetes sufferers to tackle depression head on. Southend United's Ben Coker developed diabetes when he was 15Credit:SNAP With diabetes, you are living with it 24/7, 365 days a year and yet you might just get a couple of hours with your GP each year to discuss it, explains Coker, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 15. When I was first diagnosed my biggest worry was that I may not be able to play football again, he says. Thankfully, the experts Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Athlete

The Diabetic Athlete

In 1998, two-time Olympic gold medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr. was preparing for the Goodwill Games when his hands suddenly began to shake in the middle of practice. He shrugged it off; after all, he was training up to eight hours a day, burning calories out of the pool as well as through running, weightlifting and boxing. He downed some PowerBars and Gatorade to boost his blood sugar and went back to work. But then he began sucking liquids like a diesel truck, sometimes drinking four gallons of orange juice in one sitting. Soon he couldnt make out the letters on a Pepsi can held at arms length. He had all the telltale signs of diabetes: extreme thirst, blurry vision and fatigue. When he was diagnosed, he was told that his swimming career was over. The doctors said exercise was good in moderation, but not at the level I was at, says Hall. Yet he continued to dive into his sport, revamping his diet and closely monitoring his condition for warning signs. And when he climbed out of the pool in Sydney last year, four more Olympic medals hung around his neck, two of them gold. Hall may be an exceptional case, but he shows that men can pursue active lifestyles, and even exceed their expectations, while managing diabetes. About 16 million Americans have diabetes, and about 2,200 new cases are diagnosed each day. There are two primary kinds of diabetes: Type 2, in which the body lacks sufficient insulin or the ability to use it properly, accounts for more than 85 percent of cases and is generally diagnosed in obese adults over 40. Type 1, in which the pancreas becomes unable to manufacture insulin, usually strikes those under 30 and is the more common condition among active males. Insulin is a protein hormone that enables the body to use sugar and other carbohydrates; it also help Continue reading >>

Football And Diabetes

Football And Diabetes

Your position on the pitch is a factor to consider when playing football Football is a competitive activity that, depending on how vigorously you play, can result in moderate to long intensity throughout a session. The more physically you play football, the greater the need to monitor your diabetes is. Playing once every so often will not require drastic management, but regular players will need a plan in place to keep their blood sugar levels stable. Positions on the pitch are a factor to acknowledge for footballers with diabetes. Playing in goal will not see you be as active as a midfielder, for example, who is required to work much harder and cover more ground. Gary Mabbutt , formerly of Tottenham Hotspur, has type 1 diabetes and became the most famous footballer in the United Kingdom who has the condition. Mabbutt retired in 1998 as a UEFA Cup and FA Cup winner. Danny McGrain and Andy Penman are other retired footballers who have diabetes, while Scott Allan, a Scottish midfielder with type 1 diabetes, currently plays for Hibernian. Managing your diabetes will initially be dependent on what time of the day you are scheduled to play football. Short sprints can stimulate glucagon release which raises blood glucose levels. Therefore, if your activity in the game consists mainly of short sprints with a low level of activity in between, it is possible to finish a half of football with higher blood glucose levels than at the start of the half. This effect can vary from person to person. Some positions, such as midfielders, are more likely to be moving throughout the game and are more likely to experience a steady reduction in blood sugar levels through the game. The risk of hypoglycemia during or following football can be minimised by reducing your prior basal dose. This Continue reading >>

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

Improvements in the management of diabetes mellitus in the twentieth century have made it possible for athletes to compete in sport at a professional level. While it is rare for professional athletes to have type 2 diabetes, a number of notable athletes have type 1. Literature on the management of diabetes in competitive sports focuses on the difficulties with balancing energy and insulin intake during periods of strenuous exercise.[1] The following is a list of notable sportspeople who have had diabetes during their careers. It does not include athletes diagnosed after retirement. Water-Polo Keegan Coleman, Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens (2017-current) driver/attacker, type 1 American football[edit] Jay Cutler, Denver Broncos (2006–2008) and Chicago Bears (2009–2016) quarterback, type 1.[2] Mike Echols, Tennessee Titans (2002–2004) cornerback, type 1.[3] Kendall Simmons, Pittsburgh Steelers (2002–2008) guard, type 1.[4] Jake Byrne, San Diego Chargers, tight end, type 1[5] John Chick, Saskatchewan Roughriders (2007–2009, 2013–), Indianapolis Colts (2010–11), Jacksonville Jaguars (2011–2012) defensive end, type 1[6] Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals (2011–); cornerback, type 2 Mark Andrews, Oklahoma Sooners, tight end, type 1[7] Australian rules football[edit] Nathan Bassett, Adelaide, type 1.[8] Jamie Cripps, St Kilda and West Coast, type 1.[9] Jack Fitzpatrick, Melbourne, Hawthorn type 1.[10] Brandon Jack, Sydney, type 1.[11] Paddy McCartin, St Kilda, type 1.[12] Sam Reid, Western Bulldogs and Greater Western Sydney, type 1.[8] Dale Weightman, Richmond, type 1.[8] Baseball[edit] Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1960–1973) and Chicago White Sox (1974) infielder, type 1, deceased (2010 at age 70). Sam Fuld, Chicago Cubs (2007–2010), Tampa Bay Rays (2011–2013), Continue reading >>

32 Famous People With Type 1 Diabetes

32 Famous People With Type 1 Diabetes

Test strips, blood sugar monitors, and insulin pumps are all part of a day in the life of someone living with Diabetes. Several famous actors, musicians, and athletes have Type I Diabetes. Some of these celebrities were diagnosed with diabetes when they were children, while others developed the disease later on in life. Who is the most famous person with Type I Diabetes? Sharon Stone tops our list. The "Basic Instinct" star was diagnosed with Type I diabetes. Mary Tyler Moore was diagnosed with Type I diabetes around the time she was filming "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." She is now an outspoken advocate who brings awareness to the disease. "American Idol" alum Crystal Bowersox has been hospitalized due to complications with Type I diabetes. Several famous men also have Type I diabetes. Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2008. Poison front man Bret Michaels was diagnosed with Type I diabetes when he was 6 years old. Pop star Nick Jonas was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2005. In 1957, Jackie Robinson was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic. Are you surprised that so many celebrities have Type I diabetes? Share your thoughts in the comments section. Continue reading >>

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