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Foot Spray For Diabetics

Diabetic Nerve Pain * Peripheral Neuropathy * Pain Medicine Doctors Chicago * Bolingbrook * Plainfield * Joilet * Downers Grove, Il.

Diabetic Nerve Pain * Peripheral Neuropathy * Pain Medicine Doctors Chicago * Bolingbrook * Plainfield * Joilet * Downers Grove, Il.

Peripheral neuropathy, also called distal symmetric neuropathy or sensorimotor neuropathy, is nerve damage in the arms and legs. Your feet and legs are likely to be affected before your hands and arms. Many people with diabetes have signs of neuropathy that a doctor could note but feel no symptoms themselves. Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy may include: numbness or insensitivity to pain or temperature a tingling, burning, or prickling sensation extreme sensitivity to touch, even light touch Peripheral neuropathy affects the nerves in your toes, feet, legs, hands, and arms. Peripheral neuropathy may also cause muscle weakness and loss of reflexes, especially at the ankle, leading to changes in the way a person walks. Foot deformities, such as hammertoes and the collapse of the midfoot, may occur. Blisters and sores may appear on numb areas of the foot because pressure or injury goes unnoticed. If foot injuries are not treated promptly, the infection may spread to the bone, and the foot may then have to be amputated. Some experts estimate that half of all such amputations are preventable if minor problems are caught and treated in time. The best way to prevent neuropathy is to keep your blood glucose levels as close to the normal range as possible. Maintaining safe blood glucose levels protects nerves throughout your body. Doctors diagnose neuropathy on the basis of symptoms and a physical exam. During the exam, your doctor may check blood pressure, heart rate, muscle strength, reflexes, and sensitivity to position changes, vibration, temperature, or light touch. Experts recommend that people with diabetes have a comprehensive foot exam each year to check for peripheral neuropathy. People diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy need more frequent foot exams. A comprehensi Continue reading >>

Foot Creams Foot Odour Sprays For Diabetic Feet

Foot Creams Foot Odour Sprays For Diabetic Feet

Say goodbye to tired legs . .refreshing care for silky smooth legs & feet with water lily & silk, immerse your legs into an enlivening, rejuvenating feel-good experience. Hyperion Diabetic Footwear Infection Control Hyperion Diabetic is specifically designed to offer maximum protection against foot infections which arise from footwear. It makes little sense for a podiatrist or doctor to treat the foot and then put the foot back into an infective shoe. Provides residual protection and can be used on socks, bandages, insoles and other items related to footwear. Lasts for a minimum of 3 months. For cold feet. Moisturising care for dry and normal skin. Dermatologically tested. Also suitable for diabetics. Extracts of algae, pepper, ginger, essential oils of rosemary and lavender as well as invigorating camphor stimulate the circulation and dispense a pleasant feeling of warmth. Pleasantly soothing medicinal herb balm for legs and feet.GEHWOL Leg Balm makes skin beautiful, smooth and supplewhen used regularly. Dry skin, skin blemishes, discolouration,infections of the foot and premature skin ageing are prevented. Available in 125ml. Gehwol Soft Feet Cream With Milk and Honey GEHWOL FUSSKRAFT Soft Feet Creams gently caring base contains vitamin-rich avocado oil and other valuable lipids. Special deep acting hyaluron is absorbed by the skin, supporting its regeneration and strengthening the skins own defences. In combination with urea, hyaluron binds mosture in deeper skin layers and prevents callus formation. Used to treat fungal skin infections. Also helps to control odour causing bacteria. Tea tree oil has natural disinfecting abilities. Ureka Tea Tree Footcare Cream contains 100% natural tea tree oil and soothing calendula. Odour preventing calendula is an intense moistur Continue reading >>

Treating Tinea Pedis In Patients With Diabetes

Treating Tinea Pedis In Patients With Diabetes

Patients with diabetes face a higher risk of tinea pedis, which can lead to complications, and research is scarce on the efficacy of medications in diabetic patients with the fungal condition. Accordingly, these authors provide a closer look at treatment and prevention strategies for tinea pedis, which often occurs in concert with onychomycosis. Tinea pedis is a contagious fungal infection that affects the feet of approximately 15 to 20 percent of the population, similar to onychomycosis.1-3 In comparison to otherwise healthy individuals, people with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing antifungal infection and are also more likely to face adverse complications including secondary bacterial infections, foot ulcers, paronychias, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, gangrene and lower limb amputation.4-8 Safe and effective treatment of tinea pedis is therefore imperative for people with diabetes. Tinea pedis commonly presents as red, itchy scales on the skin in between the toes and/or the soles of the feet. Often, but not always, tinea pedis presents alongside onychomycosis, causing the toenails to become thick, yellow and brittle. Since these conditions are contagious, without proper treatment, the infection may spread to both feet and all toenails. While tinea pedis can be uncomfortable and cosmetically displeasing, it is unlikely to cause any serious adverse complications in otherwise healthy individuals. For people with diabetes, however, the presence of this infection can lead to secondary bacterial infections, foot ulceration, paronychia, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, gangrene and possible lower limb amputation.4-8 Tinea pedis may lead to foot ulceration through the development of skin fissures in the plantar and/or interdigital skin. Onychomycosis, on the other hand, Continue reading >>

Nerve Pain Away - The All-natural, Fast Acting Diabetic Nerve Pain Reliever!

Nerve Pain Away - The All-natural, Fast Acting Diabetic Nerve Pain Reliever!

Buy a bottle of Nerve Pain Away for only $19.99 plus FREE SHIPPING and you will get a second bottle, just pay a separate $5.95 fee. That's a grand total of $25.94 for 2 bottles. Or you can upgrade to our deluxe version size with 50% larger bottles for just an additional $5 more per bottle. That's a grand total of $35.94 for the deluxe version. PA residents add sales tax. 30-day money back guarantee less P&H. Continental U.S. orders only. A $1.00 web service fee will apply to all orders. By clicking the Process Now button you are placing a live order and agreeing to the terms of our 30-day money back guarantee and our arbitration agreement . **This product is intended to treat temporary nerve pain and discomfort. This product is not intended to cure any particular disease or condition. If your symptoms last longer than a week consult your doctor, as persistent symptoms may indicate more serious health issues. If you are taking prescribed medications, do not discontinue use, Nerve Pain Away can be used with them. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care Guidelines

Diabetes Foot Care Guidelines

Diabetes can be dangerous to your feet—even a small cut can produce serious consequences. Diabetes may cause nerve damage that takes away the feeling in your feet. Diabetes may also reduce blood flow to the feet, making it harder to heal an injury or resist infection. Because of these problems, you may not notice a foreign object in your shoe. As a result, you could develop a blister or a sore. This could lead to an infection or a nonhealing wound that could put you at risk for an amputation. To avoid serious foot problems that could result in losing a toe, foot or leg, follow these guidelines. Inspect your feet daily. Check for cuts, blisters, redness, swelling or nail problems. Use a magnifying hand mirror to look at the bottom of your feet. Call your doctor if you notice anything. Bathe feet in lukewarm, never hot, water. Keep your feet clean by washing them daily. Use only lukewarm water—the temperature you would use on a newborn baby. Be gentle when bathing your feet. Wash them using a soft washcloth or sponge. Dry by blotting or patting and carefully dry between the toes. Moisturize your feet but not between your toes. Use a moisturizer daily to keep dry skin from itching or cracking. But don't moisturize between the toes—that could encourage a fungal infection. Cut nails carefully. Cut them straight across and file the edges. Don’t cut nails too short, as this could lead to ingrown toenails. If you have concerns about your nails, consult your doctor. Never treat corns or calluses yourself. No “bathroom surgery” or medicated pads. Visit your doctor for appropriate treatment. Wear clean, dry socks. Change them daily. Consider socks made specifically for patients living with diabetes. These socks have extra cushioning, do not have elastic tops, are highe Continue reading >>

Why And How To Care For Your Feet

Why And How To Care For Your Feet

If you have diabetes, there are three reasons why you should pay attention to your feet. First, diabetes can affect blood circulation. This means that some patients with diabetes suffer decreased blood circulation in their feet, which can also affect the skin. Second, the nerves in the foot may also be affected by diabetes. Without full sensation, patients run the risk of damaging their feet from ill-fitting shoes or walking over a small object while barefoot. Loss of nerve control in the lower limb and foot also means that the ability to sweat is limited, and this can lead to dry feet. Third, diabetes is associated with an increased risk of acquiring infection and can at the same time compromise the immune system’s ability to fight disease. This is especially the case when blood sugar levels are high. If left untreated, diabetics can possibly experience a foot infection that can spread and lead to serious complications. Back to top Find a cream you enjoy Another important point about foot cream is that it should be one you will enjoy using. If you are not happy with the cream you have, you will never use it no matter how good it is. This generally means it should be easy to apply and should deliver visible results. In addition, a foot cream for diabetics needs to meet certain requirements. For example, the skin compatibility needs to be proven in dermatological studies – as is the case with Hansaplast products. Moreover, the Hansaplast creams have a pleasant scent, which is an advantage over most other creams available for diabetics. Back to top Recommendations for care It is important for patients with diabetes to remember that their feet need special care. Checking their feet should be a natural part of their daily routine. This can be achieved by making a habit Continue reading >>

Topical Haemoglobin Spray For Diabetic Foot Ulceration.

Topical Haemoglobin Spray For Diabetic Foot Ulceration.

Topical haemoglobin spray for diabetic foot ulceration. Bateman SD. Br J Nurs. 2015 Jun 25-Jul 8. Nurse Practitioner, Specialist in Tissue Viability, South Tees NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust. Br J Nurs. 2015 Jun 25-Jul 8;24(12):S24-9. doi: 10.12968/bjon.2015.24.Sup12.S24. The development and subsequent deterioration of diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is a common occurrence across all healthcare divides, concerning all patient groups, age, gender and social environments. It increases demand on clinical resources and creates unnecessary hardship for patients. Chronic DFU is challenging to prevent and notoriously difficult to manage owing to the complex nature of the patient and the disease itself. The improvement of oxygenation to many chronic wound groups is gaining momentum across wound care; particularly in those wounds such as DFU that present with circulatory, oxygen-deficient scenarios. METHOD: A descriptive evaluation was undertaken in an acute clinical setting where a spray solution containing purified haemoglobin was used in a cohort of 20 patients who presented with chronic (>12 weeks) DFU. Standard wound care was undertaken by 18 health professionals with no changes to products, devices or practice before evaluation. All wounds received the addition of the product on eight set occasions over a 4-week period and the resulting data correlated in regards to the set outcomes of wound surface area reduction, ease of use, adverse events and patient acceptability. RESULTS: At 4 weeks all wounds had demonstrated positive wound reduction, there were no adverse events, all patients and clinicians found the product acceptable and easy to use. Interestingly, although not a set outcome, all wounds commenced the evaluation with wound-bed slough present and at 4 weeks 100% w Continue reading >>

The Use Of A Sea Salt-based Spray For Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Novel Concept

The Use Of A Sea Salt-based Spray For Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Novel Concept

The Use of a Sea Salt-based Spray for Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Novel Concept The Use of a Sea Salt-based Spray for Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Novel Concept Issue: Volume 29 - Issue 2 - February 2017 Index: Wounds 2017;29(2):E5E9. Epub 2016 November 21. Several patients present to wound healing specialists seeking a natural or alternative medical approach to their wounds. The purpose of this prospective, case-cohort study of 10 patients was to evaluate the use of Oceanzyme Wound Care Spray (Ocean Aid, Inc, Boynton Beach, FL) in improving healing in diabetic foot ulcers during a 12-week period.This product contains water purified by reverse osmosis, coral reef sea salt, lysozyme, and sodium benzoate. The primary endpoint was wound closure, and secondary endpoints were infection rate and wound area reduction. Overall, 2 patients healed, 2 withdrew, and the remaining 6 had an average of 73% reduction in wound area. While more study is needed, the use of this sea salt-based spray may provide a viable alternative for patients seeking a natural therapy for their wound care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the U.S. population) live with diabetes, including 28% who are unaware of their disease. Additionally, it is estimated that 37% of adults 20 years, and 51% of those 65 years have prediabetes, or just over one-quarter of the entire U.S. population.1 Equally alarming is that diabetes costs the United States nearly $250 billion dollars, in both direct and indirect expenditures.1 Foot ulcers are a frequent complication of diabetes. The cost associated with treating a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) alone has been documented to be between $25 000 and $60 000.2 Diabetes leads to peripheral polyneuropathy, affecting all 3 divisio Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

For chronic sufferers, especially people with diabetes, fungal infections could be common and, if left untreated, may lead to more severe foot problems. Special Care for People With Diabetes If you have diabetes, taking good care of your feet is important and should be a part of your daily health routine. Fungal infections could be common in people with diabetes and, if left untreated, may lead to more severe foot problems. For preventative tips, click here. Know the Facts About Athlete's Foot Managing diabetes can feel like a full-time job, so don’t let athlete’s foot complicate things. Educate yourself and follow these tips to prevent athlete’s foot and other foot problems. Foot Care for Chronic Sufferers The best way to beat fungus is to avoid it altogether. Take control of your foot health with LamisilAF Defense® Spray Powder. It is clinically proven to prevent most athlete's foot while providing relief from symptoms. It also absorbs wetness, keeping your feet dry and fungus free. Diabetes can also cause nerve damage and lessen the ability to feel small skin injuries where the fungus can easily infect the skin. The symptoms of athlete's foot, such as itching or burning, might also go unnoticed. For this reason, it's highly recommended that people suffering from diabetes check their feet every day and see a podiatrist regularly. A podiatrist specializes in medical foot care, including the prevention of athlete's foot, and assists with the application of medication. For more information about living with diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association website. Continue reading >>

Foot Care Q&a: Part 1

Foot Care Q&a: Part 1

People with diabetes often have questions about how best to care for their feet and what to do when problems occur. To help answer these questions, Diabetes Self-Management interviewed several foot-care experts including four podiatrists and one pedorthist who regularly work with people with diabetes. A podiatrist is a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM), who is qualified by his education and training to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle, and related structures of the leg. Podiatrists are also known as podiatric physicians or surgeons. A pedorthist is a professional trained to prevent or alleviate foot problems through the use of footwear, including shoes, orthotics, and other foot devices. The experts interviewed for this article were the following: Dr. Keith A. Beauchamp, DPM, a podiatrist who has a private practice in Macon, Missouri. Dennis Janisse, CPed, a certified pedorthist who is President and CEO of National Pedorthic Services, Inc., and is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He teaches pedorthic courses at Northwestern Medical School and the Medical College of Wisconsin. He is a past president of the Pedorthic Footwear Association. Dr. Neil Scheffler, DPM, a podiatrist and coauthor of the book 101 Tips on Foot Care for People with Diabetes, published by the American Diabetes Association. He has a private practice in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Pedro Smukler, DPM, a podiatrist with private practices in Brooklyn and Manhattan, New York. Not only does he see patients in his office, but he also visits patients in their homes. Dr. Stephanie Wu, DPM, MSc, a podiatrist and Associate Dean of Research, Associate Professor of Surgery, Associate Professor of Stem Continue reading >>

General Care Of The Diabetic Foot

General Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetic foot problems are a major health concern and are a common cause of hospitalization. Most foot problems that people with diabetes face arise from two serious complications of the disease: nerve damage and poor circulation. The lack of feeling and poor blood flow can allow a small blister to progress to a serious infection in a matter of days. Chronic nerve damage (neuropathy) can cause dry and cracked skin, which provides an opportunity for bacteria to enter and cause infection. The consequences can range from hospitalization for antibiotics to amputation of a toe or foot. For people with diabetes, careful, daily inspection of the feet is essential to overall health and the prevention of damaging foot problems. Never walk barefoot. The nerve damage decreases sensation so you may not notice that little pebbles or objects have gotten stuck in your foot. This can lead to a massive infection. Always wearing shoes or slippers reduces this risk. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Test the water temperature with your hand first. Do not soak your feet. When drying them, pat each foot with a towel rather than rubbing vigorously. Be careful drying between your toes. Use lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist. This prevents dry skin cracks and decreases the risk of infection. Do not put lotion between the toes. Trim your toe nails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, see your doctor. Good nail care is important in preventing infections. Do not use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads, or sharp instruments on your feet. Do not put your feet near radiators or in front of the fireplace. Always keep your feet warm. Wear loose socks to bed. Do not get yo Continue reading >>

Top Tips For Better Foot Care With Diabetes

Top Tips For Better Foot Care With Diabetes

Top Tips for Better Foot Care With Diabetes Foot problems are among the most feared complications of uncontrolled diabetes, and for good reason. More than 60 percent of lower-limb amputations that aren't a result of trauma occur in people with diabetes. But even if you already have complications of diabetes, amputation is by no means a givenor likely. Your best defenses: good glucose control and knowledge about foot problems, including how to prevent or treat them. Call 'em sores or woundsthey're broken skin, and that can let in harmful bacteria or fungus. Minor cuts and scrapes aren't usually a big deal, except where diabetes is concerned. When a break in the skin doesn't heal or heals poorly, it can become a chronic wound known as an ulcer. According to Lee Rogers, DPM, codirector of the Amputation Prevention Center at Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Los Angeles, a quarter of all people with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer in their lifetime, half of those will have infected ulcers, and, of those, 1 in 6 will require amputation. That's why you'll hear podiatrists stress proper foot care: Early treatment is crucial. Cracked, peeling, and flaking skin and blisters that ooze or crust. Ask your doctor about: Athlete's foot A break in the skin, redness, or swelling. Ask your doctor about: Ulcer A swollen, red foot that's warm to the touch. Ask your doctor about: Charcot foot Thick, cracked, crumbling, broken or jagged, and darkened (brown or yellow) nails. Ask your doctor about: Toenail fungus There are a number of reasons people with diabetes are more likely to have hard-to-treat ulcers. For one, neuropathy and the loss of sensation that may follow make it difficult for people to notice wounds. If they don't check regularly, a minor cut could become infected. Foot defo Continue reading >>

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs. In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs. In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of all diabetic individuals will develop these wounds , according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perhaps thats why there has been a number of exciting new developments in how these ulcers are treated. A team from China is using stem cells derived from skin appendages to improve wound healing for ulcers. Similarly, a research collective from Texas is utilizing cord cells for the same purpose . Meanwhile, a group from Northwestern University is using a mix of proteins and various cells to create regenerative bandages . A common thread among these projects is that they rely on groundbreaking technologies. However, a group of scientists from theWound Institute of Beverly Hills is relying on a much more elemental solution to treat diabetic foot ulcers. As detailed in a recent study in the journal Wounds, the WIBH team has turned to sea salt-based spray to treat these ulcers .As part of a 12-week study, the scientists treated a total of 10 patients, each with varying levels of ulcerseverity. Once a week, the wounds were treated with a combination solution made from sea salt pulled from a coral reef, purified water, sodium benzoate and lysozyme. Sodium benzoate has long been used in many wound care ointments, as it helps prevent infections by impeding microbial growth. Lysozyme, meanwhile, has demonstrated promise in improving wound healing. Continue reading >>

A Skin Spray Could Cure Chronic Skin Wounds Caused By Diabetes

A Skin Spray Could Cure Chronic Skin Wounds Caused By Diabetes

Avita has initiated a trial in the UK to evaluate the potential of its ReGenerCell technology to treat diabetic foot ulcers, a skin wound that can be very hard to treat. With offices in the UK and originally from Australia, Avita Medical is developing products in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Its technology utilises the patients own skin and the regenerative capability of the human body to treat a wide range of wounds, scars and skin defects. The ReGenerCell device enables medical professionals to use a small sample of the patients skin to create an autologous suspension, containingmultiple types of cells and wound-healing factors. This suspension is then sprayed or dripped in the wounds area. The role of regenerative epithelial suspension (RES) in wound healing. (Source: Avita Medical) Now, Avita is tackling a new condition, diabetic foot ulcer . It has enrolled the first patient at the Manchester Royal Infirmary for a 26-week trial . The study will have up to24 patients, all still undergoingstandard treatments cleansing, dressings, and offloading. Diabetic foot ulcers arelong-term open wounds resistant to most standard treatments, and a common complication in diabetes. With the currentepidemic of diabetes, this type of ulcers is one of the most expensive challenges for healthcare systems. Clinicians have already been using ReGenerCell to help the treatment ofdiabetic foot ulcers, and report positive results. Avita is now looking to formally establish the effectiveness of the product which should help boost prescriptions. The workflow of the procedure, which takes around 30 minutes. (Source: Avita Medical) Avita has conducted other trials with the same autologous technology, obtaining good results in patients with venous leg ulcer another type of chron Continue reading >>

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