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Foot Powder For Diabetics

Diabetes Foot Care - Information From Epodiatry

Diabetes Foot Care - Information From Epodiatry

Diabetes (or more correctly, diabetes mellitus) is a chronic disease that affects up to 6% of the population (higher in the older age groups). Insulin is a hormone that helps the body deal with sugar (glucose) in the diet. When diabetes is present, either the body produces less or no insulin (Type 1) or the body tissues are resistant to the effects of diabetes (Type 2). This results in higher levels of glucose in the blood, which can damage a whole range of body tissues and organs. Why the foot is so important to those with diabetes: The foot is especially affected by diabetes because: diabetes damages the nerves (damage can occur to the foot and not be detected) - this is called peripheral neuropathy . diabetes also affect the circulation. Poor circulation can affect the ability of the body to heal when damage occurs. those with diabetes are more prone to infection - the body's processes that normally fight infection respond slower and often have trouble getting to infections due to the poor circulation. diabetes can also affect the joints, making them stiffer other diabetes complications that can also affect the foot, for example, kidney disease (affects proteins that are involved in wound healing) and eye disease (can't see the foot to check for damage). As a consequence of these factors a number of things can go wrong: the foot may get damaged and you do not know about (for example, your shoe rubs a sore onto a toe that gets infected - you can not feel it because of the peripheral neuropathy - you can not heal very well due to the infection and poor circulation ). the ultimate of this process is an amputation. Diabetes is the main cause of amputations. Charcot's joints is another complication of diabetes in the foot, especially if peripheral neuropathy is present - Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

For chronic sufferers, especially people with diabetes, fungal infections could be common and, if left untreated, may lead to more severe foot problems. Special Care for People With Diabetes If you have diabetes, taking good care of your feet is important and should be a part of your daily health routine. Fungal infections could be common in people with diabetes and, if left untreated, may lead to more severe foot problems. For preventative tips, click here. Know the Facts About Athlete's Foot Managing diabetes can feel like a full-time job, so don’t let athlete’s foot complicate things. Educate yourself and follow these tips to prevent athlete’s foot and other foot problems. Foot Care for Chronic Sufferers The best way to beat fungus is to avoid it altogether. Take control of your foot health with LamisilAF Defense® Spray Powder. It is clinically proven to prevent most athlete's foot while providing relief from symptoms. It also absorbs wetness, keeping your feet dry and fungus free. Diabetes can also cause nerve damage and lessen the ability to feel small skin injuries where the fungus can easily infect the skin. The symptoms of athlete's foot, such as itching or burning, might also go unnoticed. For this reason, it's highly recommended that people suffering from diabetes check their feet every day and see a podiatrist regularly. A podiatrist specializes in medical foot care, including the prevention of athlete's foot, and assists with the application of medication. For more information about living with diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association website. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Best Foot Care

Diabetes: Best Foot Care

Our experts tell you how to protect your feet if you have diabetes. For most people, a blister , cut, or scrape on the foot is no big deal -- an "ouch!" and a hurriedly applied bandage, and it's over. Not so if you have diabetes ; meticulous daily foot care is as important as monitoring blood glucose , cholesterol , and blood pressure levels. "Unfortunately, diabetes foot-health awareness doesn't have a colored ribbon or national voice," says foot care expert James Wrobel, DPM, of the University of Michigan Medical School. "If you don't manage them early, small problems that start in the feet can cause really big ones." Show your hardworking feet some love by preventing ulcers -- open sores that can lead to serious complications like infection and even amputation . According to a report co-written by Wrobel, people who develop diabetic foot ulcers have a higher risk of dying within five years than people with some types of cancer , including prostate cancer , breast cancer , and Hodgkin's lymphoma . Remember that what you can't feel might really hurt you later, especially if infection sets in. Uncontrolled glucose levels can lead to nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy , a numbness or tingling that may affect balance and prevent you from feeling hot, cold, and even pain. Nerve damage can also compromise your body's ability to sweat, which means skin on the feet can get dry and crack, opening the body's natural infection barrier. The foot's pressure-absorbing fat pads also harden and thin out, creating ideal conditions for foot ulcers to develop. When cholesterol and blood pressure levels aren't controlled, narrowing or poor function of blood vessels in the arms and legs, called peripheral vascular disease, can reduce blood flow and circulation. Narrower vessels mean Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Tips: Can't Afford To Ignore It!

Diabetic Foot Care Tips: Can't Afford To Ignore It!

Diabetic Foot Care Tips: Cant Afford to Ignore It! Most of the time, we focus on health or skin care completely ignoring the importance of our feet. Foot care is equally important especially for diabetic people to avoid foot complications. Feet is one part of our body which is used the most. Even then, we tend to ignore it until we don't come across some serious feet problem. Feet are made up of 26 bones, held together by tendons, ligaments and muscles and wrapped in skin. Some handy and valuable tips of foot care: a) Check your feet daily for cuts, sores, red spots, swelling and infected nails. b) Do not cut corns and calluses( hardened or thickened part of the skin). Consult your doctor if you have developed corns and calluses rather than cutting them off using razor, corn plasters or some liquid corn removers. c) Make sure your toe nails are trimmed properly. Trim them straight across and smooth them using a nail file. d) If you are diabetic, consult your doctor. Diabetic patients are at more risk to developing foot complications and wounds which do not heal easily. There are three major problems which a diabetic person faces if he develops some foot disease. . Ischemia: It is poor circulation of blood. Tip: Keeping your blood sugar level in good control and taking care of your feet properly can help you avoid serious foot problems. Also avoid sitting with your legs crossed as it can reduce the flow of blood to the feet. e) Scrub your feet each time you take a shower. You can also wash them using mild soap and lukewarm water and then drying them gently. f) Wear clean socks and shoes that fit you properly. Right shoes helps you put off injuries and soreness. If you feel your feet sweat more than others, go in for leather or canvas shoes but not synthetic ones or plas Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Guide

Diabetic Foot Care Guide

Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Mass. ASPECTS OF FOOT CARE How often do you tell someone that you're going to jump into a project "feet first?" When was the last time you thought about how to "put your best foot forward?" How frequently have you told someone about the "fancy footwork" you had to perform because you "put your foot in your mouth?" To use another popular American phrase, they can be your "Achille's heel." Why? Because diabetes can cause the arteries in your legs and feet to become hardened and clogged, preventing blood from circulating properly. It can also affect the nerves in your feet, causing a loss of sensation. Without adequate feeling or circulation in your feet, even minor cuts and scratches, callouses, corns and toenail injuries can become serious problems. To protect yourself from these kinds of problems you need to carry out a daily foot care program that includes: washing and examining your feet each day; applying moisturizing creams to dry skin; filing toenails regularly; treating cuts and scratches promptly; taking care of corns and callouses; managing athlete's foot promptly; attending to warts; and, selecting footwear carefully. Perhaps feet are such a useful part of the American language because they're such an important part of our anatomy. But for people with diabetes, feet can also pose special challenges. NERVE DAMAGE AND FOOT PROBLEMS The nerves are your body's communication system, carrying information back and forth between the brain and other body parts. Some nerves, called sensory nerves, carry messages of pain, touch or temperature up to the brain. Other nerves, called motor nerves, carry instructions for movement from the brain down to the muscles in your legs, feet and hands. One of the purposes of this communication system is Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Foot Care For People With Diabetes

Foot Care For People With Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. How does diabetes affect my body? Diabetes makes your blood sugar level higher than normal. A high blood sugar level can damage your blood vessels and nerves. Damage to the blood vessels in your feet may mean that your feet get less blood. Damage to the nerves may cause you to lose some of the feeling (sensation) in your feet. Why should I worry about my feet? People with diabetes often have foot problems. Part of the problem is that if you have any loss of feeling in your feet, it's hard to tell if you have a blister or sore. Sores may take a long time to heal. If foot sores aren't taken care of, you might get a foot ulcer (a very serious, deep sore). If the ulcer then gets infected, you may need to go to the hospital for treatment or even have part of your foot amputated (removed). The good news is that with proper care you can help prevent foot problems. How should I care for my feet to avoid serious problems? Careful control of your blood sugar is the key to avoiding foot problems. It may help to monitor (check) your blood sugar level every day at home (this is called blood glucose self-monitoring). Be sure to follow your doctor's advice on diet, exercise and medicine. Here are some other things you can do to take care of your feet if you have diabetes: Check your feet daily. Call your doctor if you have redness, swelling, infection, prolonged pain, numbness or tingling in any part of a foot. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm (not hot) water and mild soap. Dry your fee Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes & Your Feet: Dos and Don'ts of Foot Care One of the best things you can do for your feet is to keep your blood sugar levels under control. That can help prevent nerve damage, or peripheral neuropathy. It can cause you to lose feeling in your feet and not know when you get sores or other injuries on them. If you already have nerve damage, good blood-sugar control and careful foot care can prevent further damage. In some cases, it can even reverse nerve damage. Also, inspect your feet every day for signs of infection such as redness, blisters, or pus. You can do this while you put on or take off your shoes and socks. If you can't easily see all of your foot, use a mirror, or ask a family member to check your feet for you. Read the Foods and Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings article > > DO:Wash your feet every day with mild soap and lukewarm water. Test the water with your elbow or a thermometer to make sure its not hot (over about 90 F). Gently pat your feet dry after washing them,and dry between your toes. DON'T:Don't wash your feet in hot water. It could cause burns. DO:Use lotion or petroleum jelly on your feet to keep the skin smooth. Sprinkle on a non-medicated powder before putting on your socks and shoes to help keep your feet dry. DON'T:Don't use moisturizer between your toes. DO:Ask your doctor if its safe to trim your own nails. Cut your toenails straight across to help prevent ingrown nails. Then file your toenails so they're not sharp on the corners. DON'T:Don't use a knife or rip out long nails to trim them. DO:Always wear shoes when youre on your feet. DON'T:Don't walk around barefoot or only in socks. DO:Make sure your shoes fit well and have plenty of room. Its best to shop for shoes at the end of the day, when your feet are usually at the Continue reading >>

Is Foot Odor Linked To Diabetes?

Is Foot Odor Linked To Diabetes?

Foot odor is usually caused by the breakdown of bacteria on the skin, and it isnt relegated only to those who have diabetes anyone can suffer from it. However, sometimes it can be a symptom of a more serious diabetes-related problem such as a foot infection or ulcer that has gone undetected because of nerve damage and should be checked. Inspect your feet carefully and if you detect a foot wound, see your provider immediately. If your foot odor is not serious, however, and is simply an inconvenience, you can find some relief from daily bathing, changing socks and keeping feet clean and dry. Here are some other tips from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) to help you control odor while still treating your feet gently: Use an antibacterial soap and soft brush to gently scrub away dead skin when you bathe. If your feet get wet during the day, youll need to change socks more often. Always wear socks when you wear shoes. Avoid plastic or synthetic shoes. Some foot odor problems are really from smelly shoes, so be sure to dry out shoes between wearings and get new shoes when your old ones can no longer be cleaned. Try anantiperspirantorpowder for your feetto help controlodor. There are also special insoles with activated charcoal, available at large drug stores or from a foot-care specialist. Reprinted from 101 Foot-Care Tips for People With Diabetes by Jessie H. Ahroni, Ph.D., ARNP, CDE. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. If you spend time on social media, why not get your diabetes tips there also? Lifescript has a dedicated type 2 diabetes Facebook page that offers diabetes tips, recipes, inspiration and more. Youll get advice, find friends, and discover solutions to everyday living. Come join us! Thanks for signing Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Information And Guidelines

Diabetic Foot Care Information And Guidelines

Diabetic Foot Care Information and Guidelines Home /Diabetic Foot Care Information and Guidelines Diabetic Foot Care Information and Guidelines jhdesigns21 2018-06-05T05:26:12+00:00 Here we will focus only on how diabetes affects the feet and how the health issues it causes can lead to serious two-fold concerns and medical issues for your feet. Understanding prevention and treatment of diabetic foot problems before they affect your mobility is an extremely important part of guidelines for good Diabetic Foot Care daily practices. If you have Diabetic Foot Problems Contact Dr. Mikkel Jarman, Podiatrist in Gilbert AZ a suburb of Phoenix. Call our office (480) 497-3946 if you have questions or want to schedule an appointment. What Happens to Your Feet when you have Diabetes: 1) It can reduce blood flow to your feet. This will deprive your feet important nutrients and oxygen making it difficult for sores, blisters , and cuts to heal. 2) It also causes damage to your nerves causing shooting pain and numbness in your feet. This condition is known as peripheral neuropathy which can lead to numbness and other conditions which can affect your feet. It is very important to know all about foot problems associated with Diabetes as this will help you recognize the signs before your feet are completely affected. To have healthy feet, you need to schedule regular checkups with your foot doctor , recognize symptoms in your feet, practice good diabetic foot care, and examine your feet closely. You can schedule your appointment online anytime! Diabetes is One of The Common Reasons Why People Suffer From Painful Feet There are four types of foot problems caused by diabetes that may affect your feet: People suffering from diabetes are more susceptible to bacterial, fungal and yeast infecti Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Care

Diabetes And Foot Care

Tweet Foot care amongst diabetics is incredibly important as foot related complications are common for those of us with diabetes. Foot ulcers for example, which affect as many as 1 out of 10 people with diabetes, can all to easily develop from blisters and small wounds to posing a threat of amputation. Even small ulcers on the foot can represent a serious risk: they may heal extremely slowly and need rigorous treatment to cure. Ulcers can develop into serious lower body infections, with the possibility of amputation at an advanced stage. Caring for your feet Caring for your feet as a diabetic should not be difficult, and should be a prime consideration. This section details complications that may affect the diabetic foot, and some methods and information about care. Why is foot care important? The presence of high blood glucose levels over a long period of time may result in a condition called diabetic neuropathy (damage to the nerves) or loss of circulation in the extremities of the body. If the nerves in your feet or legs are damaged, your feet can lose sensation and become numb. It is relatively common for people with diabetes to not feel foot problems until they have developed, therefore it is key to ensure you have regular foot examinations. Diabetic foot complications include: Foot ulcers - open wounds on the foot Charcot foot - deformation of the foot Caring for your feet Foot care involves reducing damage from occurring to your feet and regularly checking your feet for any signs of damage. Damage to your feet can be reduced by avoiding walking barefoot, wearing correctly fitting footwear and keeping your feet clean and in good condition. Check your feet every day for any signs of damage. Checking your feet You should regularly examine your own feet for signs of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care: 10 Accessories To Improve Life | Sterishoe Blog | Coping Products For Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic Foot Care: 10 Accessories To Improve Life | Sterishoe Blog | Coping Products For Peripheral Neuropathy

The truly scary thing about diabetic neuropathy is a 10-letter word we usually associate with horrific accidents or Civil War battlefieldsamputation, writes Patrick J. Skerett for the Harvard Health Blog . He explains that seemingly innocuous blisters, cuts, or sores can become infected wounds that do not heal. To prevent serious foot complications , diabetics can use the following 10 diabetic foot care accessories to make life easier. Foot problems are one of the many potential complications diabetics face. 1.Telescoping foot mirror This long-reach mirror helps you inspect the bottoms of your feet for cuts, bruises, foot fungus, redness, warts, calluses, ulcers, or other aberrations. Use this tool at the end of each day to inspect your feet for changes. 2.Shoe horn A shoe horn makes it easier to put your shoes on, which will help you prevent cutting or chafing your heels trying to slide your feet into footwear. 3.Foot brush Sometimes it takes more than soap and water to remove dead skin and pathogens from the feet.The soft bristles of a foot brush ensures that the bottoms of your feet and spaces between your toes get fully cleaned. Pumice stones made from lava can smooth the feet. 4. Pumice stone This abrasive lava stone removes dead skin (especially along the heels), opens the pores, and boosts circulation. Speak to a podiatrist before using a pumice stone to remove corns or calluses. 5. Epsom salt According to Live Strong , Epsom salt foot soaks can relieve foot pain, swelling, and tension. Its also said to help regulate blood sugar levels. We mentioned Epsom salts in the past as a potential remedy for toenail fungus. 6.Moisturizing cream Applying a moisturizing agent after showering (everywhere except in between the toes) can reduce the likelihood that your skin wi Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Feet

Caring For Your Feet

When you have diabetes, your feet need extra-careful attention. That’s because diabetes places you at a higher risk of getting foot infections. There are several reasons for this, and they are all related to high blood glucose levels. First, high blood glucose is associated with damage to blood vessels, which can result in reduced circulation to the feet. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, decreased blood flow will slow the healing process. Second, high blood glucose can keep white blood cells from effectively fighting off an infection. In addition, many people with diabetes develop neuropathy, or nerve damage, in their feet. When nerves are damaged, the ability to sense heat, cold, pressure, and pain may be diminished. Often, changes in sensation in your feet occur over a long period without you even knowing it. You may experience a tingling, “pins and needles” feeling in your feet, or the nerves may become numbed and you may feel very little. When you lose feeling in your feet, you lose the ability to know when you have a sore, blister, or injury. This is called loss of protective sensation. When you don’t feel the pain, you’re less likely to treat the problem – and that could cause serious complications. Leaving a wound untreated can allow it to become infected, and the infection could become serious enough to require amputation. Unfortunately, diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations are on the rise. The financial and emotional costs of such losses are considerable. The good news is that if you pay attention to your foot health daily, you can do much to prevent the conditions that can lead to amputation. About three-fourths of all diabetes-related amputations are preceded by chronic foot ulcers. Therefore, a person with diabetes has a very good c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care — Protect To Prevent

Diabetic Foot Care — Protect To Prevent

People with diabetes may be prone to skin and foot problems. Here are a few simple things you can do every day to protect your skin and feet: Plan! Get plenty of rest. Sleep 7 to 8 hours each night. Children need even more sleep. Bathe daily. Clean skin reduces the likelihood of skin infections. Wear comfortable clothes. Clean socks and comfortable shoes are especially important. Space activities wisely. Dryness and other common skin problems Dry skin can be caused by dehydration, which occurs in poorly controlled diabetes. Remember that excessive urination and thirst are symptoms of diabetes. For dry, itchy skin, try Alpha Keri bath oil. A capful in bath water softens and lubricates your skin. But be careful — bath oil makes your tub slippery. After bathing use a lanolin base cream to hold moisture in your skin. Skin infections People with poorly controlled diabetes are prone to skin infections because elevated blood sugar reduces the effectiveness of bacteria-fighting cells. Carbuncles, boils, and other skin infections may be hazardous if not properly treated. Even a small cut may progress to a deep, open sore, called an ulcer, if not treated promptly. In most cases, good hygiene (clean skin) and good diabetic control will improve your body’s ability to resist infection. Sometimes, however, antibiotics are necessary. Foot care In long-term diabetes, blood circulation to and from the feet decreases, slowing the healing process for foot injuries. Because nerves in the feet may not work well, you may not feel small foot injuries and therefore you may fail to treat them promptly. Untreated foot injuries can become infected or ulcerated. To avoid foot problems, take steps for proper diabetic foot care, such as to keep your feet clean and wear comfortable shoes and sock Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Foot Care Mistakes

6 Diabetes Foot Care Mistakes

My aunt looked up at her medical van driver with a sheepish grin, scratch my foot, she says. He reaches down toward her foot as she bursts out in laughter. He blushes with embarrassment when he sees they arent there. My auntie had an amazing sense of humor. She took her chronic illness in stride every day and found laughter around every corner. You were blessed with two feet that have taken you many places in life and they can take you on many more adventures if you care for them lovingly. Diabetes foot care mistakes can lead to severe complications, such as; foot ulcers, infections, and possibly amputation. If you are facing diabetes head on, there are a few things with your feet you will need to consider. My aunt wore Birkenstock shoes every single day that I can remember. Yes, they are comfortable and cool looking, but after a few years she couldnt wear any other type of shoe. Her foot bones formed into the notches in the soles. Lets take a look at some common issues with diabetics and shoes: Wearing shoes that fit into all the curves of the feet and not just the arch. This can actually begin to re-shape the foot over time. Wearing flat shoes like; deck shoes, basketball shoes, and even flip flops. These do not give your arch enough support and can lead to plantar fasciitis, or irritation of the plantar muscle that runs along the bottom of your foot. Buying shoes that are too narrow can lead to rubbing and foot ulcers. Solution: Your feet will need a good fitting shoe that doesnt rub on any pressure points. You will also need extra room in the toes, good arch support, and ankle support. Check with your podiatrist and see if they have a shoe rack that you can purchase special diabetic shoes from. If these are too costly, ask your endocrinologist or podiatrist for a r Continue reading >>

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